What is the Best Way to Reduce Heart Attack Symptoms?


What is the Best Way to Reduce Heart Attack Symptoms? Reduce Heart Attack Symptoms - Surprising Heart Attack and Weight Connection Discovered. Those who are overweight and out of shape are at a higher heart attack risk. Those who are fit and slim are at a low heart attack risk. This is a well-documented fact. Or is it? A new study in the journal Scientific Reports puts this fact to a test, and the results were quite unexpected.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN COMPLETELY CLEAN OUT THE PLAQUE BUILD-UP IN YOUR ARTERIES

 

Reduce Heart Attack Symptoms – Surprising Heart Attack and Weight Connection Discovered

 

Those who are overweight and out of shape are at a higher heart attack risk. Those who are fit and slim are at a low heart attack risk.

 

This is a well-documented fact. Or is it?

 

A new study in the journal Scientific Reports puts this fact to a test, and the results were quite unexpected.

 

The researchers recruited 52 physically active men between the ages of 18 and 30 and divided them into the three waist-to-height ratio groups.

 

A waist-to-height ratio is your waist circumference divided by height.

 

Carrying extra weight around the belly area (donut) has long been considered to be a predictor of heart attack risk. As such, a high waist-to-height ratio is often used as an indicator to see if people are at higher risk of heart attack.

 

A waist-to-height ratio of 0.5 is considered relatively safe but anything higher would indicate increased risk (the higher the riskier).

 

Now they measured the men’s post-exercise recovery, which is a great indicator of heart health.

 

Post-exercise recoveries are measured by having the subject exercise hard and then monitor how quickly they recover. The most important data is how fast the heart rate decreases and how quickly the blood pressure drops. Both of these are controlled by your parasympathetic nervous system.

 

Unsurprisingly, the post-exercise recovery time increased with increased waist-to-height ratios. Men with waist-to-height ratio fared the worst.

 

That’s of course why people with a high ratio have been found to be at higher risk of heart attack.

 

But the finding that alarmed the scientists was that many of those whose ratios fell below the heart disease risk threshold still recovered at a rate that indicated a serious heart disease risk.

 

This came as a surprise, not only because these subject’s ratios were below the heart disease risk threshold, but also because they were not overweight and were relatively active physically, often playing recreational sports over the weekends.

 

However, this is no surprise to us who have been studying natural health for a long time. Body fat is not a direct indicator of plaque build-up in your heart arteries – which of course is THE cause of heart attack.

 

And there is ONE ingredient, explained here, that’s responsible for ALL the cholesterol plaque build-up – and cutting out this one ingredient cleared out my 93% clogged heart arteries, reduce heart attack symptoms,…

 

Reduce Heart Attack Symptoms – High Cholesterol? It’s Not WHAT You Eat But WHEN

 

If you have high cholesterol, and especially if your LDL (bad) cholesterol is high, chances are you’ve been told to drastically change what you eat.

Pretty much cut out everything you like and load up on the food you hate, right?

 

But a new study published in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases reveals that you can normalize your cholesterol by just shifting WHEN you eat, and this can be done without making any changes to your diet.

 

A team of scientists analysed the information of 1,283 adults that were collected by Taiwan’s Nutrition and Health Survey. 44.4 percent of them were female and the rest were male.

 

They asked the participants to recall the details of their daily food intake, including the exact dishes, snacks, and mealtimes, and also tested the participant’s cholesterol and blood fats.

 

Here are how people ate on the average:

 

  1. Morning breakfast: 05:00 to 09:29, 385 calories.
  2. Mid-morning snack: 09:30 to 11:29, 123 calories.
  3. Noon lunch: 11:30 to 13:39, 522 calories.
  4. Afternoon snack: 13:30 to 17:29, 171 calories.
  5. Evening dinner: 17:30 to 20:30, 557 calories.
  6. Night-time snack: 20:30 to 04:59, 169 calories.

 

From this table, you can see that their diets were rather light in the mornings and increasing to heavy in the evenings, with a surprising amount of snacking during the night.

 

Now, the interesting discoveries:

 

  1. Those who snacked more than 100 calories during the night had 0.94 mg/dL higher LDL cholesterol than those who did not.

 

  1. Those who snacked more than 100 calories of fat during the night had 2.98 mg/dL higher LDL cholesterol than those who did not.

 

  1. Those who ate 100 extra calories in the morning or noon instead of eating them as a night-time snack dropped their LDL cholesterol by 1.46 mg/dL (morning) and 1.27 mg/dL (noon).

 

  1. Those who ate 100 extra calories of fat at noon or in the evening instead of eating them as a night-time snack dropped their LDL cholesterol by 5.21 mg/dL (noon) and 3.19 mg/dL (evening).

 

Why is the timing of meals important?

 

Using previous studies as a guide, the researchers explained that our bodies produce and use cholesterol differently depending on the time of the day.

 

As such, your liver produces different amounts of cholesterol at different times of the day, your intestines take up different amounts at different times of the day, and many of your tissues use different amounts at different times of the day.

 

There is also some evidence that your liver produces most of its cholesterol at night.

 

Now, if you eat a lot of fat at night, and your liver spikes its cholesterol production at the same time, your body will be bombarded with cholesterol at the time when you are the least physically active and your body uses the least of it.

 

Hence, shift your calorie and fat intake from nights and even evenings to mornings and afternoons.

 

But there is only one real thing that matters when it comes to cholesterol and trying to reduce heart attack symptoms. And that is to cut out this one hidden ingredient, as explained here…

 

Reduce Heart Attack Symptoms -Is Meat Good or Bad for Cholesterol? (Surprise, Surprise)

 

If you have heard that vegan and Mediterranean diets are heart healthy but have been incapable (or unwilling) of eliminated red meat from your diet, you will love a new study that was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

 

Scientists from the Purdue University and the University of Texas Medical Branch accepted that the Mediterranean diet had great cardiovascular benefits but wondered whether red meat really spoiled these benefits.

 

They decided to test the theory by putting 41 overweight or moderately obese volunteers through a series of diets.

 

They first ate a Mediterranean diet that contained 500 grams of lean, unprocessed red meat per week, for five weeks. This was supposed to be the amount of meat the typical American consumes weekly (around three ounces per day).

 

They then returned to their normal eating patterns for five weeks.

Lastly, they returned to the Mediterranean diet for five weeks, but this time with only 200 grams of meat per week (three ounces twice a week).

 

This is closer to what the Mediterranean diet actually looks like.

 

While they were on the Mediterranean diet, including both the meaty and low-meat variants, they experienced an improvement in blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, while their HDL cholesterol, glucose, and insulin remaining unchanged.

 

This meant that the Mediterranean diet was healthy, and that the amount of meat consumed with it will not ruin the benefits you receive from this healthy diet.

 

The researchers were impressed to see that the heart benefits could be seen after only five weeks of healthy dieting, and they expected that glucose and insulin levels in the subjects would also have responded positively if the participants had remained on the diet for a longer period.

 

Now, just so you know, both Beef and Pork Checkoffs funded this study, which might disqualify the results a little.

 

For more ideas to reduce heart attack symptoms, watch this video – 15 Foods That Reduce Your Heart Attack Risk According to Doctors   

However, if you want to normalize your cholesterol completely and reduce heart attack symptoms, you must cut out this one ingredient (that you did not even know you’re consuming)– as explained here…

 

This post is from the Oxidized Cholesterol Strategy Program. It was created by Scott Davis. Because he once suffered from high cholesterol, so much so that he even had a severe heart attack. This is what essentially led him to finding healthier alternatives to conventional medication. Oxidized Cholesterol Strategy is a unique online program that provides you with all the information you need to regain control of your cholesterol levels and health, as a whole.

 

To find out more about this program, go to How to Reduce Heart Attack Symptoms

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