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Here is a Gluten free shopping list for thyroid health

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A gluten free diet excludes all types of grains that contain gluten. Your local health food store is one of the best places to seek out gluten free alternatives to common grain based products.

 

Here is a gluten free shopping list which shows gluten free alternatives to some common foods:

 

  • Breads: rice, buckwheat + ‘wheat free’ varieties.
  • Breakfast cereals: organic corn flakes, rice bubbles, Amaranth, puffed buckwheat + gluten free muesli.
  • Flours: 100% buckwheat, rice, Besan (chickpea), Lupin, coconut.
  • Noodles: rice + 100% buckwheat.
  • Pasta: vegetable + rice varieties.
  • Porridge: Quinoa, rice + Polenta porridge.
  • Rice: brown rice + white rice varieties.

 

It is important to read food labels carefully as gluten is often a hidden ingredient in packaged foods. This includes; baking powder, flavourings and hydrolysed vegetable protein. Beer may contain varying amounts of gluten as it is produced by the alcoholic fermentation of germinated cereals, usually barley.

 

Cross contamination of gluten free foods can occur during the manufacturing process when these foods come into contact with foods that contain gluten.

 

For example, if the same equipment is used to make a variety of snack foods some gluten free items may become contaminated. Food labels often include a ‘may contain gluten’ statement if this is the case.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – Gluten Free Shopping List – 10 Day Clean Eating Challenge

If a food is labelled ‘gluten free’ is does not necessarily mean it is healthy

 

‘Gluten free’ foods are not always healthy and can in fact be harmful to the thyroid. Food manufacturers regard corn (maize) and soy ingredients as cost effective substitutes for gluten containing grains.

 

Corn and soy ingredients should be strictly avoided when you have an under active thyroid problem. Further, corn and soy are common food allergens and in turn can also initiate symptoms of food intolerance.

 

When you are checking labels also look for soy and Canola oil. These cheap oils are popular with food manufacturers and are routinely labelled as ‘vegetable oil’. This makes them sound healthy but they are actually damaging to the thyroid gland.  If you are not sure be a label detective, look closely under the ingredient list to see if it states the product contains soy.

 

Activating your gluten free grains

 

All grains including gluten free varieties have naturally occurring enzyme inhibitors that make them difficult to digest and also lower absorption of important minerals.

 

Eating large quantities of grains and using flours that have not been soaked, sprouted or fermented can lead to mineral deficiencies and long term bone loss. This means all gluten free flours and wholegrains should be activated with these traditional methods to release their full nutritional potential.

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

5 Best Ways to Protect Yourself from Iodine Toxicity

 

Is It Safe To Take Iodine When You Have Hashimotos Disease?

 

Why these Top 5 Thyroid Blood Tests are Essential?

 

What Causes High Reverse T3 (RT3) – a Major Driver of an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms are Strikingly Similar to Hypothyroidism Symptoms?

 

Why Testing for Viral Infections Can Solve Your Thyroid Disorder?

 

What can Harmful Environmental Chemicals Do to Thyroid Function and Body Weight?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

Why a Gluten Free Diet can Help Thyroid Health?

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Is a gluten free diet just a fad, or could eliminating gluten help thyroid health and end the bloat, brain fog, and nagging indigestion?

 

Could a gluten free diet really help thyroid health?

 

What is gluten?

 

Gluten is the main structural protein found naturally in a variety of grains including wheat, rye, spelt, barley, oats and triticale. Triticale is a cross between wheat and rye.

 

Gluten is also used as a single ingredient in many processed foods as it makes an ideal binder or thickener. This means you could be consuming additional gluten without knowing it.

 

A gluten free diet

 

A gluten free diet strictly excludes all grains and packaged foods containing gluten. This means cutting the common gluten containing foods such as bread, pasta, breakfast cereals, desserts and biscuits from the daily diet.

 

This may not be as restrictive as it first appears as health food stores and supermarkets offer gluten free alternatives. In addition, vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, seeds, fresh fish and lean organic animal protein are all naturally gluten free.

 

However for most people changing to a gluten free diet plan is a big step and takes some getting used to. The restrictions can even make you feel downright deprived. But the payoff can be enormous!

 

Many people experience life changing transformation when they cut gluten. They lose weight, especially around the middle and they notice a dramatic improvement in their health and vitality.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – My Gluten Free Diet – What I Eat

The modern problem with wheat

 

These days highly refined wheat is the most common source of gluten as it is used in a wide variety of foods found in supermarkets. To meet ongoing demand wheat is grown on an industrial scale. Along with the development of modern agricultural methods there has also been selective breeding of wheat.

 

Wheat crops now yield a much higher ratio of gluten. This is not good news for those who are gluten sensitive or have diagnosed gluten-related disorders. If eating gluten causes digestive discomfort, even weight gain the culprit may actually be the modern, hybrid wheat varieties.

 

Dr. William Davis is a respected cardiologist and author of Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health. Dr Davis believes wheat is the single biggest contributor to the country’s obesity epidemic. In part because aggressive breeding methods and genetic manipulation have turned wheat into what Davis describes as a ‘Frankenwheat’.

 

There is also evidence the newer high yield wheat strains are less nutritious and lack important nutrients such as zinc, iron, copper and magnesium.

 

Gluten sensitivity can result in a broad range of symptoms

Gluten can easily irritate the lining of the digestive system. Once this happen the body launches a swift immune response as it reacts to gluten as something foreign.

 

This creates inflammation that spreads like wildfire throughout the whole body.

 

Gluten sensitivity symptoms can therefore be linked to specific digestive problems as well as broader health issues in other parts of the body.

 

Renowned neurologist David Perlmutter believes gluten can initiate reactions within the brain that can spark a range of health problems. This includes headaches, depression, anxiety and even dementia. Dr Perlumtter is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar. Your Brain’s Silent Killers. In his book Dr Perlmutter explains that gluten containing grains can be extremely destructive within the brain.

 

Could you be gluten intolerant?

 

Gluten sensitivity can result in a broad range of symptoms. Here is a checklist of the main symptoms:

 

  • Weight loss or weight gain, especially abdominal weight gain
  • Fatigue or feeling tired after eating a meal that contains gluten
  • Digestive problems: bloating, pain, gas + diarrhoea
  • Weak + cracked fingernails
  • Fat in the stools due to poor breakdown of dietary fat
  • Joint + muscle pain
  • Mood swings + depression
  • Poor memory + concentration
  • Skin rashes including dermatitis herpetiformis
  • Osteoporosis due to lowered mineral absorption
  • Migraine headaches

 

Emotional stress can play a significant role in intensifying the symptoms.

 

Did you know it takes around 4 weeks of strictly avoiding gluten to discover if gluten is a problem for you?

 

It takes this long for your system to calm down if gluten has been causing digestive distress. If you feel far better when you exclude gluten, or feel worse when you reintroduce gluten then it’s very likely a problem for you.

 

The good news is that it’s much easier these days to find healthy gluten free alternatives that help thyroid health, which you will read about in my next article.

 

Can a gluten free diet help thyroid health and heal hypothyroidism?

 

Once gluten is removed from your diet it is very likely you will notice improvements in your health, especially if you have an autoimmune thyroid disorder.

 

Minor symptoms such as bloating, fatigue, brain fog and indigestion can disappear fairly quickly when gluten is excluded from the diet.

 

Improvements in chronic health problems made worse by gluten sensitivity such as arthritis, eczema and autoimmune diseases including Hashimoto’s thyroiditis usually take longer.

 

What is the gluten – thyroid link?

 

# Gluten can also cause your immune system to start attacking the thyroid. The molecular composition of your thyroid tissue is very similar to gluten. So for those with an autoimmune thyroid disorder it can be a case of mistaken identity.

 

Eliminating gluten from your diet may reduce the ongoing autoimmune attack on your thyroid. For some individuals, when they strictly eliminate gluten from their diet their thyroid antibody levels decrease.

 

# Gluten is destructive to the lining of the digestive tract.  A gluten intolerance reduces digestive function leading to compromised immune function and lower absorption of a wide range of vital nutrients. This is not good news for thyroid health.

 

Digestive health is closely linked to optimal immune system function. A large mass of lymphoid tissue including several types of specialised immune cells are located in the digestive tract. The lymphoid tissue helps defend your body against pathogens. An imbalance in digestive function can therefore impair immune activity.

 

# Poor digestive health leads to mal-absorption issues. The thyroid is particularly sensitive to nutritional deficiencies. For example; iodine, zinc and selenium are crucial to proper thyroid hormone activity. In addition, ongoing research confirms individuals with low selenium intake, or poor absorption of selenium are more likely to develop Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

 

There are two factors:

 

A selenium deficiency results in lower activity of the selenium dependent enzymes vital to assist ongoing activity of the thyroid hormones, including activation of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3). Low T3 is associated with the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

 

Selenium plays a role in protecting the thyroid gland itself as this mineral boosts glutathione activity. Glutathione is naturally produced by the body using selenium and a combination of three amino acids sourced from dietary protein – cysteine, glycine and glutamine. Glutathione acts as a potent antioxidant and is highly active within the thyroid to help protect this important gland.

 

To help thyroid health, watch these 2 videos below here – Gluten and Thyroid Health: Is It Safe for Hypothyroidism?  And Gluten Sensitivity: Thyroid And Gluten Sensitivity

Coeliac disease

 

For people with coeliac disease a strict gluten free diet is advocated for life as gluten damages the lining of their small intestine and prevents adsorption of essential nutrients. Even a minute amount of gluten will prompt a noticeable immune reaction.

 

Coeliac disease is one of the most common inflammatory conditions affecting the digestive system. The abnormal immune response caused by gluten can make a person susceptible to other autoimmune problems including autoimmune thyroid disorders. Grave’s disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are frequently diagnosed along with coeliac disease.

 

Coeliac disease is commonly considered to be a genetic disorder however it can be set off later in life by a stressful event, such as an infection, injury or surgery. A specific diagnostic test is used to confirm coeliac disease.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet. The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly recommends excluding all gluten foods from your diet. This forms a part of a holistic plan to recover your thyroid health. If you do not have a copy of this eBook you can get instant access on the order page.

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

5 Best Ways to Protect Yourself from Iodine Toxicity

 

Is It Safe To Take Iodine When You Have Hashimotos Disease?

 

Why these Top 5 Thyroid Blood Tests are Essential?

 

What Causes High Reverse T3 (RT3) – a Major Driver of an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms are Strikingly Similar to Hypothyroidism Symptoms?

 

Why Testing for Viral Infections Can Solve Your Thyroid Disorder?

 

What can Harmful Environmental Chemicals Do to Thyroid Function and Body Weight?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

What can Harmful Environmental Chemicals Do to Thyroid Function and Body Weight?

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Several factors are known to influence thyroid function and health. Thyroid disorders tend to run in families, low iodine intake can depress thyroid activity, and exposure to radiation harms the thyroid.

 

However in addition to these established risk factors ongoing research reveals toxic environmental chemicals pose a serious threat to your thyroid function and health.

 

Could daily exposure to harmful environmental chemicals have negative effects on your thyroid?

 

Like it or not widespread global industrialisation over the last few decades has flooded the planet with a cocktail of dangerous environmental chemicals.

 

Contamination is widespread, and poses a serious threat to the quality of the food we eat, the water we drink and the air we breathe.

 

Environmental health experts warn exposure to even very small concentrations or a complex mixture can interfere with reproduction, immune health and nervous system function.

 

Over time exposure to risky environmental chemicals can lead to a diverse range of health problems such as hypothyroidism, chemical sensitivities, nervous system disorders, even some cancers.

 

Environmental chemicals and thyroid function

 

The thyroid is extremely vulnerable to the effects of hazardous environmental chemicals. It should therefore come as little surprise that thyroid problems are escalating as we become increasingly exposed to environmental pollution.

 

The incidence of thyroid disease, most notably thyroid cancer and thyroid autoimmune disease is increasing substantially.

 

There is a wide array of environmental chemicals that harm thyroid health. Termed ‘thyroid-disrupting chemicals’ these pollutants have the ability to change the way thyroid hormones act in the body.

 

They can also directly attack the thyroid, block uptake of iodine in the thyroid, trigger thyroid antibody production leading to an autoimmune thyroid disorder and increase the risk for serious thyroid conditions.

 

Watch this Video Here from Dr. Justin Marchegiani – Thyroid Toxins Causing Hypothyroidism | Low Thyroid Symptoms

 

Does Daily Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Cause Weight Gain, and Even Obesity?

 

Emerging research also reveals that everyday exposure to toxins can contribute to weight gain. Termed ‘obesogens’, these potent environmental chemicals have the potential to cause weight gain, even obesity.

 

Dietary, pharmaceutical, and industrial compounds alter a range of processes within the body which in turn can increase the risk of being overweight and obese. According to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association even children are at risk.

 

Researchers found children exposed to high levels of bisphenol A (BPA) are five times more likely to be obese than children with low levels. BPA mimics oestrogen, the main female hormone. This means this compound is capable of having effects similar to oestrogen in the body. In excess oestrogen activity is harmful to both the male and female body.

 

Exposure to BPA is widespread as this toxic chemical is used in the lining of aluminium cans, baby bottles, printed store receipts, plastic containers and medical devices.

 

Sure an unhealthy diet and a sedentary lifestyle are certainly risk factors for obesity but studies such as this add to the evidence of a possible link between environmental chemicals and spiralling obesity rates.

 

Watch this Video Here from Dr. Brad Shook – How BPA, Latex and fire retardants affect Thyroid Function

The following list of the most hazardous thyroid disrupting chemicals is a little daunting but gives you an idea of what we are up against. These chemicals are all around us so we need to look at minimising our exposure as much as possible for proper thyroid function.

 

  • pesticides found in the food and water supply
  • polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) found in older paints, electrical equipment and building materials
  • heavy metals such as cadmium, lead and mercury
  • dioxins and dioxin-like compounds from the environment
  • phthalates found in vinyl and plastic products
  • polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) flame retardants present in carpets, clothing, soft furnishings, electronics and plastics
  • polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in air pollution
  • bisphenol A (BPA) found in a variety of food and beverage packaging
  • bromides used in oils to stabilise citrus flavoured soft drinks, commercial bakery products, some flours and is also found in pesticides
  • halogens which include fluoride, chlorine, perchlorate and bromide. Halogens compete for the same receptor sites as iodine with excessive intake crowding out optimal iodine activity.

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

5 Best Ways to Protect Yourself from Iodine Toxicity

 

Is It Safe To Take Iodine When You Have Hashimotos Disease?

 

Why these Top 5 Thyroid Blood Tests are Essential?

 

What Causes High Reverse T3 (RT3) – a Major Driver of an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms are Strikingly Similar to Hypothyroidism Symptoms?

 

Why Testing for Viral Infections Can Solve Your Thyroid Disorder?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

Why Testing for Viral Infections Can Solve Your Thyroid Disorder?

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Uncovering a long standing infection could offer a real solution to solving your thyroid disorder. Did you know chronic infections can easily masquerade as hypothyroidism?

 

In fact, there’s often an overlap between hypothyroidism and symptoms triggered by a lingering viral infection.

 

This article discusses testing for viral infections. Long standing infections that are active in the body are linked to chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

Chronic fatigue syndrome, aka myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) is a disease of the immune system.

 

There is a vast amount of research to demonstrate infections are the most likely cause of chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

How to Test For Viral Infections

 

There is no single test to diagnose a chronic viral infection, or even multiple viral infections. For this reason medical practitioners usually screen a patient for the main viruses which tend to cause long term problems. Your medical practitioner will also take into account your symptoms and health history.

 

Antibody Tests Are Usually Used To Check For Long Standing Viral Infections

 

Termed antibody tests, these types of blood tests are the obvious place to start the search for chronic infections.

 

Antibodies are molecules produced by the immune system to fight an infection. By doing specific antibody tests you can detect the presence of antibodies to a particular viral infection. When antibodies are discovered it will also reveal whether you were infected recently or in the past.

 

A stable positive result indicates past infection. In contrast, a high antibody load indicates recent infection, or reactivation of a past infection. The most consistent marker of progression of an infection within the body is a rising antibody titre. This term is used to describe the amount of antibodies that are measured within a blood sample.

 

Active viruses travel through the blood. These microscopic viruses are ‘non-living’ and they lack the ability to replicate on their own. To ensure their survival these viruses must take hold within the host cell. Left unchecked by the immune system they have the ability to integrate themselves into many cells of the body.

 

The two leading viruses that trigger chronic fatigue symptoms are Epstein – Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV).

 

Medical practitioners often test for these two viruses when a patient has fatigue issues. These two viruses often target the central nervous system and liver causing problems.

 

The tests listed here will help diagnose an infection with the viruses most commonly associated with chronic fatigue symptoms.

 

  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibodies
  • Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibodies
  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV)) antibodies
  • Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies
  • Herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies
  • Varicella Zoster virus antibodies

 

A Viral Infection Can Give Rise to a Diverse Range of Symptoms

 

A virus lodged within the cell continues to replicate and by integrating itself deep within the cell it avoids detection by the immune system. The immune system therefore does not make antibodies to viruses that have become hidden within organs and other tissues of the body.

 

This makes identifying a viral infection a real challenge. It is possible to have a significant intracellular infection, but still show relatively low antibody levels when you take an antibody test.

 

A chronic viral infection can cause a range of diverse symptoms depending on the original infection involved. When a virus takes hold in the central nervous system, or enters an organ such as the liver or digestive tract it gives rise to a range of complaints such as fatigue, liver tenderness and neurological problems.

 

Your medical practitioner may also request a white cell count (WCC) and liver function test (LFT).

 

Watch this Video below – How are viral infections diagnosed and treated

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

5 Best Ways to Protect Yourself from Iodine Toxicity

 

Is It Safe To Take Iodine When You Have Hashimotos Disease?

 

Why these Top 5 Thyroid Blood Tests are Essential?

 

What Causes High Reverse T3 (RT3) – a Major Driver of an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms are Strikingly Similar to Hypothyroidism Symptoms?

 

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms are Strikingly Similar to Hypothyroidism Symptoms?

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The hall mark symptom of chronic fatigue syndrome is overwhelming physical and mental exhaustion which is not made better with rest. It is also gives rise to a long list of debilitating symptoms.

 

Chronic fatigue syndrome symptoms checklist

 

There are striking similarities between the symptoms of hypothyroidism and those listed for chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

The two conditions overlap, as both are associated with what is essentially a functional breakdown in the body’s ability to generate energy at a basic cell level.

 

Chronic fatigue syndrome takes feeling tired to a whole new debilitating level.

 

Spot the signs…

 

  • Aching joints.
  • Chemical sensitivity.
  • Digestive problems. Including nausea, bloating, constipation or diarrhoea.
  • Fibromyalgia (muscle pain).
  • Food intolerances.
  • Heart palpitations; increased heart rate or shortness of breath with exertion or on standing.
  • Low blood pressure. You may also feel dizzy if you get up too quickly.
  • Neurological symptoms. Poor memory and concentration, muscle twitching, mild electric shock sensations in the muscles and tingling in the joints or muscles.
  • Pain and tenderness of the liver
  • Persistent fatigue.
  • Reduced ability to cope with changes in temperature.
  • Sleep problems.
  • Sore throat and runny nose.
  • Tender lymph nodes.
  • Urinary problems.
  • Vision loss.

 

How big a role do infections play in the onset of chronic fatigue syndrome?

 

Some infections, once thought to only cause short lived symptoms may in fact remain active in the body giving rise to a range of diverse symptoms depending on the original infection, or multiple infections involved.

 

Termed ‘latent infections’, these are not necessarily dormant infections. There is mounting evidence these infections continue to play a major role in disrupting healthy immune system activity.

 

Chronic fatigue syndrome is characterised by an immune system that is continually ‘switched on’. It is commonly assumed that some type immune dysfunction is occurring. This is a theory and has not been proven conclusively.

 

Is it possible the immune system remains activated as it is fighting against some type of latent infection? Many of the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome closely resemble those associated with a lingering infectious illness.

 

Some of the infections linked to chronic fatigue syndrome include:

 

  • Barmah Forest virus
  • Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium (linked to Lyme disease)
  • Coxiella burnetii (linked to Q fever)
  • Coxsackievirus A + B
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Echoviruses
  • Epstein-Barr virus
  • Hepatitis B virus
  • Herpes virus
  • Ross River virus
  • Rubella virus (linked to German measles)
  • Varicella zoster virus (linked to shingles)
  • Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV)

 

Due to the close connection between the thyroid and the immune system an effective treatment plan to recover your thyroid health should include a proper investigation into the possible role infections are playing on your health and vitality.

 

This is particularly important if you have a thyroid autoimmune disorder.

 

Of all the environmental factors with a potential to trigger autoimmunity, the most important seem to be viruses, bacteria, and other infectious pathogens. They have long been associated with autoimmune diseases.

 

Uncovering a latent infection, or even multiple infections may provide the missing pieces of the puzzle to help you recover your thyroid health. Your medical practitioner can request specific blood tests to check for viral infections commonly associated with chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

Apart from checking for chronic infections there is no single blood test or scan to accurately diagnosis chronic fatigue syndrome. The diagnosis is usually made after all other illnesses are excluded.

 

Watch this video below – Solutions for chronic fatigue syndrome, low thyroid activity, digestive disorders & much more

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

5 Best Ways to Protect Yourself from Iodine Toxicity

 

Is It Safe To Take Iodine When You Have Hashimotos Disease?

 

Why these Top 5 Thyroid Blood Tests are Essential?

 

What Causes High Reverse T3 (RT3) – a Major Driver of an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

What Causes High Reverse T3 (RT3) – a Major Driver of an Underactive Thyroid?

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If you are experiencing the typical signs and symptoms of an underactive thyroid but your Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, free T4, and even your free T3 appear to be normal you may want to consider checking your reverse T3, which is an inactive form of T3.

 

This article answers the question ‘what causes high reverse T3’.

 

Firstly, what does a high reverse T3 mean to your health?

 

Too much reverse T3 can trigger a range of symptoms associated with an underactive thyroid such as fatigue, depression, hair loss, muscle weakness, low blood pressure, and a slower than normal pulse rate.

 

The single reverse T3 test is included in the top 5 thyroid blood tests that are most useful to check your thyroid health. Many integrative doctors and Naturopaths now consider the reverse T3 blood test to be essential to effectively diagnose and manage hypothyroidism.

 

What causes high reverse T3 (RT3)? {There are 5 key reasons}

 

+ Unrelenting physical and emotional stress.

 

Ongoing stress and anxiety cause cortisol to soar. Cortisol is the hormone that helps you cope with stress.

 

There is a flip side to having excessive amounts of cortisol circulating in your blood stream. High cortisol inhibits normal thyroid hormone activity. This leads to an excess amount of reverse T3 being produced.

 

Health experts propose this is a protective response to slow metabolism and conserve energy during times of prolonged stress. Your body knows it simply cannot survive on high alert for too long. It can lead to burnout.

 

+ Extreme, or yo-yo dieting.

 

Cutting calories in an effort to lose weight sparks the body’s hard wired famine response. Your body feels the need to conserve energy when food becomes scarce and it achieves this by putting the brakes on your metabolic rate.

 

The easiest and quickest way your body can slow your metabolic rate and thereby conserve energy is by producing a massive amount of reverse T3.

 

+ Low iron is leaving you tired and breathless.

 

Chronic iron deficiency is a common finding of an underactive thyroid. This deficiency needs to be addressed as a lack of iron impairs proper thyroid hormone metabolism. More specifically, low iron decreases healthy conversion of thyroxine (T4) to more active triiodothyronine (T3).

 

Adequate levels of iron are especially important to help fight fatigue as this mineral is required by your red blood cells to carry oxygen around your body. When iron is low your oxygenation levels are low and your body cannot utilise T3 at a cell level.

 

+ Long term exposure to toxins.

 

Toxins such as heavy metals, pesticides, and industrial chemicals switch on a physical stress response. Toxins also have serious effects on your thyroid health.

 

At a cellular level toxins can block the thyroid cell receptors so the thyroid hormones cannot perform their job, and toxins can enter the thyroid causing damage to the actual thyroid tissue.

 

These factors sabotage day to day function of your thyroid leading to an underactive thyroid. Over time the stress of dealing with toxins and the diminishing function of the thyroid can activate far greater production of reverse T3.

 

+ Systemic illness is a factor.

 

It is difficult to recover from reverse T3 dominance when a chronic underlying illness is not addressed. When your body feels under threat by a long standing illness it slows metabolism. Your body hits the ‘hibernation’ button to lessen the impact of a chronic illness.

 

For example, a latent viral infection may be causing widespread problems. This can lead to chronic fatigue syndrome which is often associated with over production of reverse T3.

 

If you have low T3 you should get your reverse T3 checked, especially if you have some type of long standing illness. On testing it’s typical to see low T3 and high reverse T3.

 

Treating excess reverse T3 secondary to a specific chronic illness is best discussed with a skilled healthcare practitioner.

 

Watch this Video Below Here from Dr.Richard Hagmeyer – How High Reverse T3 Causes Symptoms Associated with an Underactive Thyroid

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

5 Best Ways to Protect Yourself from Iodine Toxicity

 

Is It Safe To Take Iodine When You Have Hashimotos Disease?

 

Why these Top 5 Thyroid Blood Tests are Essential?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

Why these Top 5 Thyroid Blood Tests are Essential?

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The top 5 thyroid blood tests I recommend will help reveal how well your thyroid is working. Also discover why you need to check more than TSH.

 

For most people the standard thyroid test used to assess their thyroid health is the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) test. This test measures the amount of TSH circulating in your bloodstream.

 

TSH is a thyroid hormone however it is not actually produced by the thyroid. It is produced by the pituitary gland located deep within the brain.

 

When TSH is released by the pituitary gland it travels to the thyroid via the bloodstream to signal to the thyroid to get busy making your essential thyroid hormones.

 

The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are: thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Greater quantities of TSH are released when the body requires more T4 and T3.

 

Could you have an underactive thyroid despite having a ‘normal’ TSH?

 

Testing thyroid health status is controversial. Due to restraints within the medical system the stand alone TSH test is regarded as the gold standard to check your thyroid health.

 

Individuals are often advised no further investigation is necessary when their TSH test result falls within the acceptable reference range. This can be despite the fact they are displaying the typical signs of a thyroid in crisis.

 

A TSH test result may appear ‘normal’ but this can be misleading and does not automatically rule out a low thyroid issue.

 

Simply testing TSH also raises questions about what level should be considered adequate and the validity of using a wide reference range. Current research shows TSH between 0.5 and 2.0 mIU/L is ideal.

 

What are the top thyroid blood tests?

 

A single test of TSH is often inadequate.  If you suspect your thyroid is underactive it is a good idea to discuss comprehensive thyroid testing with a skilled healthcare practitioner.

 

Testing more than TSH will help reveal how well your thyroid is actually working and is useful to monitor your thyroid health recovery.

 

Comprehensive testing includes an evaluation of the key thyroid hormones. Testing free T4 and T3 provides clues as to how much of these hormones are ‘free’ and available for uptake and use throughout the body.

 

If you rely on simply testing TSH alone and do not measure these two main thyroid hormones you are missing critical parts of the puzzle.

 

In addition, when you assess the amount of circulating T4 and T3 in the bloodstream it provides an overall picture of how much T4 is converting to the more potent T3. For many people with a thyroid problem their bodies are not converting T4 effectively through to T3.

 

When T3 levels rise it is usual to notice improvements in low thyroid symptoms. T3 helps stimulate metabolism which has far-reaching effects in the body including sparking energy metabolism, fat burning for weight loss and reducing thyroid hair loss.

 

Under normal conditions your body converts T4 to both T3 and ‘reverse T3’, which has the opposite effects of T3. The body quickly eliminates reverse T3 if it is not required to put the brakes on metabolism. Low T3 can indicate T4 is not converting effectively to T3 and may in fact be creating excess amounts of reverse T3.

 

Too much reverse T3 is rapidly produced when you are under enormous stress. This then leads to the common symptoms of a sluggish thyroid.

 

Only a specific test for reverse T3 can identify high levels of this inactive form of T3. Reverse T3 dominance syndrome is diagnosed when reverse T3 remains elevated.

 

Evaluating thyroid antibodies levels will confirm an active thyroid autoimmune disorder. Most commonly elevated levels of thyroid antibodies are associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis which is a chronic inflammatory condition of the thyroid.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – Thyroid Blood Tests

In summary, the top 5 thyroid blood tests I recommend are:

 

  • thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)
  • free T4 (FT4)
  • free T3 (FT3)
  • thyroid antibodies
  • reverse T3 (RT3)

 

When discussing getting thyroid blood tests, you should also mention if you have a family history of thyroid problems and definitely list your thyroid related symptoms.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – Everything You Need to Know about Thyroid Blood Tests

Low thyroid symptoms are significant indicators that your thyroid is not working well and should not be ignored.

 

The most common low thyroid symptoms include fatigue, feeling the cold, dry skin and hair, low libido, weight gain, menstrual irregularities, mood changes, low blood pressure, heart palpitations, hair loss and muscle weakness. Your individual symptoms should be carefully considered along with the thyroid blood test results.

 

You may also want to mention if you have had any serious infections such as hepatitis, Epstein-Barr virus or cytomegalovirus. These viruses are often linked to chronic fatigue syndrome. It is not unusual to see raised reverse T3 levels in response to chronic illness.

 

Watch this Video Below Here –

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

5 Best Ways to Protect Yourself from Iodine Toxicity

 

Is It Safe To Take Iodine When You Have Hashimotos Disease?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

Is It Safe To Take Iodine When You Have Hashimotos Disease?

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When you spend some time online researching the question “is it safe to take iodine when you have Hashimotos” you will soon realize there are conflicting opinions, and information about how much iodine is safe to take.

 

If are feeling confused, you are not alone. It can be a challenge making sense of it all. For this reason I would like to answer this important question from my Naturopathic perspective.

 

Firstly let’s take a look at some facts that we all know to be true

 

+ Your body does not make iodine. Consequently, this mineral must be derived from the diet or from an iodine supplement.

 

+ Your thyroid requires a constant supply as iodine is an essential component of your thyroid hormones.

 

+ Nutrient rich blood continuously circulates through your thyroid so iodine is simply absorbed as required.

 

+ About 80% of your body’s iodine stores are held in your thyroid.

 

+ When your thyroid has enough iodine it stops absorbing iodine from the blood supply.

 

+ This mineral is normally only required in trace amounts. Adverse effects are more likely when excessive amounts are taken.

 

+ Iodine deficiency is a common world health problem.

 

+ Iodine is critical to overall health, not just the thyroid. For example, iodine plays a role in the immune response, is essential for normal growth and development of a developing baby, and is particularly important to safeguard breast and prostate health.

 

+ In Australia, iodine supplements, or thyroid supplements that contain iodine usually supply microgram, not milligram quantities of iodine.

 

+ A microgram measurement of iodine is routinely abbreviated as ‘mcg’ or ‘µg’.

 

+ It’s important to know 1000 micrograms equals 1 milligram.

 

+ The Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the US Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health (NIH) have both set the safe upper level of intake from all sources at 1,100 micrograms (1.1 mg) daily.

 

+ Hashimoto’s disease is a complex autoimmune thyroid problem. It’s associated with chronic inflammation which over time can lead to destruction of the thyroid gland.

 

There is no evidence to suggest that iodine alone will solve a complex thyroid disorder such as Hashimoto’s

 

It’s true, iodine alone will not help heal your thyroid. However it is still an important nutrient for day to day function of the thyroid.

 

If your iodine stores get too low this will place further pressure on your thyroid. Taking what is considered a safe amount of iodine is usually necessary to support ongoing thyroid hormone activity.

 

Single iodine may not be the solution

 

Iodine is ideally best taken in combination with selenium. In fact, selenium is an important nutrient to consider if you have a diagnosed autoimmune thyroid disorder.

 

Ongoing research shows selenium can help reduce raised thyroid specific antibodies. This is promising research for those with Hashimoto’s.

 

Selenium helps reduce the risk of iodine aggravating your thyroid if you did opt to take a sudden and excessive amount of iodine.

 

When I hear someone with Hashimoto’s report a bad experience with iodine it does raise two key questions in my mind. Did they take too much? Were they also low in selenium?

 

A good quality thyroid health formula contains both iodine and selenium. The nutritional panel or supplement facts section on a label is the best place to check the amount of iodine and selenium.

 

You may already know that here in Australia nutritional companies are not permitted to recommend more than 300 micrograms of iodine, and 150 micrograms of selenium per day for adults.

 

Your take home message: not too much, not too little

 

It’s a myth that any amount of iodine is dangerous when you have Hashimoto’s. In truth, it’s really about balanced intake. The controversy is centered on how much iodine is safe to take.

 

Studies do indeed confirm taking iodine well above what is generally recommended can trigger an autoimmune reaction, particularly if selenium is in short supply.

 

Yes, you can get too much of a good thing and opting to take extreme amounts of iodine may be harmful when you have diagnosed Hashimoto’s disease.

 

An iodine overload could actually cause a flare up, and worsen your hypothyroid symptoms. As with any type of autoimmune condition tissue destruction is at an all-time high when you experience a flare up.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – Hashimoto’s: Should I Take Iodine for my hypothyroid?

 

In summary…is it safe to take iodine when you have Hashimotos?

 

+ Iodine supplements can help prevent and treat an iodine deficiency.

 

+ Iodine supports ongoing thyroid hormone production and is normally only required in trace amounts to be effective.

 

+ Selenium is a mineral that safeguards your thyroid. Adequate selenium intake can also reduce the risk of iodine aggravating your thyroid if you opted to take excessive amounts.

 

+ When you are taking a prescribed thyroid medication your medical practitioner can advise if an iodine supplement will be suitable for you.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – Are Iodine Supplements Safe for Low Thyroid (Hypothyroid)

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

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Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the thyroid, the small gland at the base of the neck.

 

This thyroid disorder was first described by the Japanese specialist Dr. Hashimoto Hakaru in 1912. Today Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism.

 

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is termed an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune problems occur when the immune system attacks specific organs of the body.

 

The immune system launches an attack on an organ in the same way it would attack a foreign invader such as a virus or bacteria.

 

The autoimmune reaction associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis creates inflammation within the thyroid. The thyroid stops functioning properly, and in some cases the inflammation leads to destruction of the thyroid.

 

The signs and symptoms of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are similar to the symptoms usually associated with hypothyroidism. The symptoms vary widely depending on the severity of the problem.

 

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and pregnancy

 

Optimal thyroid health is particularly important for women who are pregnant or who are considering having a baby. For women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis there is an increased risk of early miscarriage or developing postpartum thyroiditis within the first year of having a baby.

 

How to diagnose Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

 

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is signified by excess production of thyroid antibodies. To diagnose this disorder a specific test that measures antibody levels is required. Abnormally elevated thyroid antibodies thereby confirm the diagnosis.

 

Your healthcare practitioner may request the following pathology tests; thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Most practitioners will also measure T4 and T3 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to determine how the thyroid gland is functioning.

 

A physical examination of the thyroid region along with a thyroid ultrasound may also be performed.

 

A single test of TSH is inadequate to screen an individual for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. You must get your thyroid antibodies checked!

 

Why is the thyroid prone to autoimmune disease?

 

There are no established reasons why the immune system triggers an autoimmune attack on the thyroid. Some health researchers think a virus or bacterial infection may initiate this response, while others believe a genetic flaw may be involved.

 

It is likely Hashimoto’s results form a range of factors. This thyroid autoimmune disorder may be triggered by exposure to toxins, chronic infections, food intolerances (especially gluten), high iodine intake and heavy metal toxicity.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – What Causes Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

There is a high volume of blood washing through your thyroid. This makes the thyroid extremely susceptible to damage from environmental toxins or whatever compounds happen to be circulating in the blood. Damaged thyroid cells may be the spark that ignites an autoimmune reaction within the thyroid.

 

There is a clear-cut link between selenium and thyroid function. Is this the missing link?

 

After iodine the next most important nutrient to aid thyroid health is selenium. Selenium acts as an important co-factor to the iodide peroxidase enzyme. This specialised enzyme converts thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3). This enzyme therefore plays an pivotal role to regulate concentration of T3.

 

Selenium also plays an important role in safeguarding the thyroid from environmental damage.

 

This trace mineral helps boost glutathione, a potent antioxidant that is highly active within the thyroid. Glutathione is naturally produced by the body by combining selenium with three amino acids sourced from dietary protein. These three amino acids are cysteine, glycine and glutamine.

 

The thyroid contains more selenium than any other body part. When a deficiency develops due to low dietary intake an individual is more likely to develop an autoimmune thyroid disorder. In fact, in regions of severe selenium deficiency there is a higher incidence of autoimmune thyroid disorders.

 

Research suggests selenium supplementation could be useful in combination with levothyroxine (T4) in the treatment of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

 

Selenium is generally considered safe when taken as recommended. In Australia and New Zealand it is recommended that a daily dose of 150 micrograms from dietary supplements should not be exceeded.

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

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Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

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It’s well accepted iodine supplements are effective for preventing and treating an iodine deficiency. They are generally considered safe when taken as recommended.

 

Iodine Is Essential For Proper Thyroid Function

 

Nutrient deficiencies are a common issue for those with hypothyroidism. Iodine is one nutrient you don’t want to get low in as the thyroid uses iodine to make your thyroid hormones. This makes iodine important for ongoing thyroid health.

 

Iodine deficiency can lead to iodine induced hypothyroidism, enlargement of the thyroid, and a reduced ability of the thyroid to produce thyroid hormones.

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Safe?

 

It turns out there is a vast amount of research in this area including how much iodine is safe to take.

 

There is one guiding rule that I would like everyone to know.

 

It’s about balanced intake. Not too much, not too little!

 

Iodine is normally only required in very small amounts. In fact iodine supplements normally supply trace, or microgram quantities.

 

When you research iodine supplements online, or thyroid health formulas with iodine, it’s important to know that 1 milligram equals 1,000 micrograms. You may see a microgram measurement abbreviated as ‘mcg’ or ‘µg’ on a label.

 

Iodine Supplements in Australia Are Strictly Regulated

 

In Australia all nutritional products are closely regulated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), a division of the Department of Health and Ageing.

 

Nutritional supplements must be approved before being released for sale. Approved products state their individual AUST L or AUST R number on the front of the label.

 

The active ingredients contained in a product and the recommendations on the label are also closely controlled. The recommended daily intake of iodine from an iodine supplement must not exceed 300 micrograms per day. For example, when a nutritional supplement contains 130 micrograms of iodine it’s recommended that an adult does not take more than two capsules per day.

 

If an iodine supplement was to contain milligram amounts it would not be approved for sale here in Australia. Even if one tablet, or capsule was recommended per day the recommended intake would be set too high.

 

In addition to dosing guidelines the TGA provides strict guidelines on the type of iodine that can be used. Iodine is an approved ingredient for use in a nutritional supplement when it is a component of a specific herbal preparation or is in the form of potassium iodide.

 

For example an iodine supplement can contain Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus), a type of seaweed which is known to naturally contain iodine and is traditionally used to help maintain healthy thyroid function.

 

Another popular form of iodine featured in thyroid health products is potassium iodide. No other single form of iodine is approved for use in an iodine supplement in Australia.

 

It’s Vital to Know the Safe Upper Level of Intake

 

You should avoid taking high doses of iodine for prolonged periods unless you are doing this in consultation with a trusted healthcare practitioner.

 

Taking iodine in mega doses can pose problems. Taking multiple milligram amounts can saturate your thyroid which can irritate and inflame the gland.

 

The documented side effects of taking too much iodine include; a metallic taste, sore gums, a burning sensation in the mouth and throat, increased saliva, digestive upset, mood changes and skin problems.

 

Population studies have also shown excessive iodine intake may trigger autoimmune thyroid disorders.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – Iodine Supplements Warnings

The Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the US National Institutes of Health have both set the recommended safe upper level of intake at 1,100 micrograms per day.

 

Are USA Iodine Supplements Safe To Buy Online?

 

When you do a quick search of iodine supplements online you will soon discover there is certainly conflicting opinions and information about how much iodine is safe to take.

 

For Australian consumers it’s important to know that iodine products available on USA websites are not regulated by the TGA. This government organisation only has jurisdiction within Australia.

 

It is possible iodine supplements available on USA websites can contain excessive amounts of iodine.

 

The TGA advises consumers to refrain from ordering nutritional products over the internet unless they know exactly what is in the product, have checked that the ingredients are suitable for them, and the products they are purchasing meet the legal requirements for importation and use in Australia.

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

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