What is the Best Way for Curing Type 2 Diabetes Naturally?


Curing Type 2 Diabetes Naturally - Doctors and nutritionists have been telling us for decades to drink less of this drink, as it contains saturated fat that clogs our arteries and raises our blood pressure. This was however completely debunked in a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition written by Singaporean, Chinese, and American researchers. In fact, this drink protects you against type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.
CLICK HERE TO DISCOVER THE 3 EASY STEPS TO BEAT TYPE 2 DIABETES IN 28 DAYS OR LESS

Curing Type 2 Diabetes Naturally – Diabetes Cause So Common, You Are Probably Doing It Too

It’s a scary fact, but it’s also very real – the amount of diabetes cases is rapidly increasing – everyone knows someone with diabetes.

There are a number of things that contribute to developing type-2 diabetes, but the journal JAMA Internal Medicine claims there’s one type of food to blame…and you’re probably eating it, every day!

Stop eating this food and watch what happens to your diabetes in a few days.

Ultra-processed foods are foods that contain plenty of additives to enhance their taste, appearance, or shelf life – these are the types you do not find growing in any garden.

Scientists have found ultra-processed foods to be involved in the development of obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and cancer, which prompted them to examine whether it plays a role in diabetes too.

The team led by the University of Paris identified 104,707 participants from the French NutriNet-Santé study that ran between 2009 and 2019. They examined dietary habits and intakes of more than 3,500 foods.

The foods were grouped according to the NOVA classification system into four types: unprocessed/minimally processed foods, culinary ingredients, processed foods, and ultra-processed foods.

After excluding lifestyle and other health factors that can cause diabetes from their analysis, they discovered that, for every 10 percent of additional ultra-processed foods included in their diets, the risk of developing diabetes increased by 15 percent.

Researchers do agree more research is needed and that there are other factors that have been linked to endocrine dysfunction and insulin resistance, such as some common components found in plastic – phthalates and bisphenol A.

Still, while future research is necessary, this result is valuable and confirms that natural minimally processed foods like fruit, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds are the healthiest foods to eat.

You can completely reverse your diabetes in just 28 days, just like my mum did, by following these simple three steps

Curing Type 2 Diabetes Naturally – This Fatty Drink Prevents Blood Pressure and Diabetes

Doctors and nutritionists have been telling us for decades to drink less of this drink, as it contains saturated fat that clogs our arteries and raises our blood pressure.

This was however completely debunked in a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition written by Singaporean, Chinese, and American researchers.

In fact, this drink protects you against type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.

They analyzed information collected by the Singapore Chinese Health Study between 1993 and 2017, with each of the 37,124 Chinese men and women having been observed for at least 10 years.

They were all asked to complete food questionnaires and were all subsequently interviewed to identify physician-diagnosed health conditions.

By the end of the period for which they were observed, they were all between 45 and 74 years old.

Those who drank 240 milliliters of milk had a 12 percent lower risk of diabetes and a six percent lower risk of hypertension than those who drank no milk.

When milk was excluded from the analysis and only other dairy products were considered, people who ate 252 grams of dairy products per day had a seven percent lower risk of hypertension and a 10 percent lower risk of diabetes than those who consumed no dairy products.

But milk is only one piece in the puzzle to completely reverse Type 2 Diabetes. Here are the exact 3-steps thousands of readers have used to cure themselves

And if you have high blood pressure, discover how 3 easy exercises drop it below 120/80 – starting today

Curing Type 2 Diabetes Naturally – Type 2 Diabetes Cured with This Widely Disliked Diet

A new study shows that there is a diet that works better than the conventional low-calorie diabetic diet to keep your weight and blood sugar under control.

It even completely cured a big portion of the study participants!

The only problem is that as much as some people praise this diet, the majority of people are going to absolutely hate it.

So, what’s it going to be? Suffer type 2 diabetes with all the complications or tolerate a diet that’s you’re going to hate?

The study was published in The Journal of the American College of Nutrition, in July 2017.

Czech, American and Italian researchers split their 74 subjects into two groups that adopted different diets for six months.

One group went on a vegetarian diet that was, in fact, close to vegan, consisting of vegetables, grains, legumes, fruits and nuts, with only the equivalent of one portion of low-fat yoghurt allowed per day.

The other group adopted the conventional diabetic diet as prescribed by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, consisting of 50 percent vegetables, 25 percent lean proteins and 25 percent grains.

Both diets contained approximately 1,500 to 1,800 calories per day and meals were prepared for the subjects, so they didn’t have to struggle with concocting their own recipes.

After six months, the vegetarian group lost 6.2 kilograms of weight, while the conventional dieters lost only 3.2 (approximately 14 pounds versus 7 pounds).

The scientists also used magnetic resonance imaging to examine what type of fat their subjects were losing: subcutaneous (below the skin), subfascial (on top of muscles) and intramuscular (inside muscles).

While the two groups lost the same amount of subcutaneous fat, the vegetarian group lost substantially more intramuscular fat than the conventional dieters and only the vegetarians lost subfascial fat.

This is important for diabetics and prediabetics because it is in subfascial fat that a lot of your insulin resistance happens.

When they tested their subject’s glucose and insulin sensitivity, they found that the vegetarians indeed had lower fasting plasma glucose and improved beta-cell insulin sensitivity.

42 percent of the vegetarians could reduce their medication and around 10 percent reversed their conditions completely.

To get more ideas for curing type 2 diabetes naturally, watch this video – Reverse Diabetes Without Medication

Now if you want to cure your type 2 diabetes but don’t want to go vegan, then follow the 3-step strategy, found here, that thousands of readers have used to successfully reverse their type 2 diabetes within a month

This post is from the 3 Steps Diabetes Strategy Program. It was created by Jodi Knapp from Blue Heron health news thathas been recognized as one of the top-quality national health information websites. 

In this program, Jodi Knapp shares practical tips and advice on how you can prevent and cure diabetes naturally. She also dispels myths commonly associated with diabetes, like for example, diabetes being a lifelong condition. There are also lots of information going around that is simply not true and she’s here to correct it.

Diabetes is a disease, and it can be cured. This is just one of the important tips Jodi reveals in her program. Also, she included several ways in preventing the onset of disease, choosing the right food to eat, recommended vitamin supplements, the right time of the day to take the blood sugar and many more.

But the most amazing thing would have to be her program which only takes 3 simple steps to help you to control & treat type 2 diabetes. What it does is cure diabetes without having to rely on expensive drugs, diets that make sufferers crave for even more food they are not supposed to eat, and exercise programs that make people feel tired and depressed.

To find out more about this program, click on Curing Type 2 Diabetes Naturally

Revealing Here the 5 Best Vegan Protein Powder


Some of you may be thinking about introducing vegan protein powder into your meal plan. However, you may be concerned that the protein quality isn’t as high or that you can’t get enough protein. It is true that the quality of single-sourced vegan protein powders isn’t as high as whey, casein, egg, etc. However, vegan protein powders with multiple protein sources – in the correct ratios – are arguably just as good.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

Vegan protein powder is kind of a big deal these days.

Just waltz into Whole Foods, GNC, or your local supplement store and give the protein powder section a once over.

Some of you may be thinking about introducing vegan protein powder into your meal plan. However, you may be concerned that the protein quality isn’t as high or that you can’t get enough protein.

It is true that the quality of single-sourced vegan protein powders isn’t as high as whey, casein, egg, etc. However, vegan protein powders with multiple protein sources – in the correct ratios – are arguably just as good.

Mixing Multiple Bioavailable Protein

You are what you eat, or better yet, you are what you digest.

Some plant foods like soy can stand alone because they’re a complete protein and can virtually go toe-to-toe* with meat.

*Based on essential amino acid profiles.

However, a mixture of plant-based proteins is always optimal because they can collectively “pack a nutritional punch.” They also better ensure the spectrum of amino acids needed for muscle growth.

Some powders only use one source (e.g. soy, rice, etc.) versus brands like Garden of Life® (13 different sprouts) that use several sources.

That said, it’s also important to consider the quality of protein, not just the volume. For instance, whey or soy protein are higher quality and offer more absorbable protein than hemp protein.

PDCAAS: Protein Rating System

The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and the WHO (World Health Authority) both adopted a rating system for protein. It is called the Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score, or PDCAAS.

This rating system provides a reliable way to understand the quality of protein. It’s based on the amino acid requirements of people and their respective digestibility.

The highest score possible is 1.0.  Whey and casein milk proteins, egg whites, and – drumroll, please – soy protein isolate achieve this status.

However, other complete protein sources don’t get high rankings on the PDCAAS scale.

Quinoa, for instance, has a relatively modest ranking. Proteins like this should be considered a good source when shopping vegan protein powders.

Please note that different sources of information on PDCAAS values may vary slightly on the numbers below. That said, this will give you a reasonable idea of what you’re working with.

The table shows the ratings of selected foods. Proteins with around 0.70 or higher are considered “high quality” with this rating system.

  • casein (milk protein)
  • soy protein isolate
  • egg white
  • whey (milk protein)
  • 0.92 beef
  • 0.91 soybeans
  • 0.89 quinoa [5]
  • 0.78 chickpeas
  • 0.75 black beans
  • 0.73 vegetables
  • 0.70 legumes
  • 0.69 pea
  • 0.52 peanuts
  • 0.46 hemp

*Please note that processing can alter these foods from their raw form.

Looking for the best vegan protein powder on the market?

I had to write this article after reading a few seemingly disconnected posts by media sources like Bodybuilding.com and Men’s Fitness who miss the mark* on the topic (in my humble opinion).

*It’s worth mentioning that the quality of content produced by both of these guys is usually excellent though.

Oddly enough, Peta.org seems to be dialed-in to the vegan protein powder scene better than most.

Let’s jump into the ratings! 

The first two products listed have the highest quality. In fact, I mix them both together in my protein shake to cover as much nutritional ground as possible in this recipe: “The Ultimate’ Vegan Protein Shake.”

Best New + Overall Vegan Protein Powder

  • KOS Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder Chocolate

Nutritional details: 20g protein, 5g carbs, 2g fat, 120 calories, 2g fiber, 2g sugar

Proteins:

  • Organic Pea
  • Organic Flax Seed
  • Organic Quinoa
  • Organic Pumpkin Seed
  • Organic Chia Seed

Summary: It’s USDA organic, 100% non-GMO, and soy-free. It mixes easy and is composed of healthy fibers and digestive enzymes that help your digestive system run efficiently.

Approximate cost per serving: $1.70 retail (as low as $1.32 online)

Best Tasting Vegan Protein Powder

  • PlantFusion – Organic Plant Protein – Vanilla Chai

Nutritional details: 20g protein, 7g carb, 2g fat, 120 calories, 1g fiber, 0g sugar

Proteins:

  • Organic Pea Protein
  • Organic Sprouted Amaranth
  • Organic Sprouted Quinoa
  • Organic Flax Seed
  • Organic Millet
  • Organic Lentil
  • Organic Flax
  • Organic Chia

Summary: It’s organic and soy-free. It also includes a healthy dose of fermented foods to supercharge your digestion with a full spectrum of natural food-based probiotics and enzymes. These help overall nutrient digestion and absorption. This protein powder tastes the best and has a silky-smooth texture.

Approximate cost per serving: $2.80 retail (as low as $1.90 online)

Best Price

  • Sunwarrior – Warrior Blend – Chocolate

Nutritional details: 17g protein, 3g carbs, 1g fat, 100 calories, 2g fiber, 0g sugar

Proteins:

  • Raw Organic Pea Protein
  • Raw Cranberry Protein
  • Raw Organic Hemp Seed Protein

Summary: It’s organic and soy-free. It’s less generous with protein sources, but it still has a complete amino acid profile. Not the best tasting vegan protein powder, but this version tasted much better than the Classic option.

Approximate cost per serving: $1.23 retail (as low as $1.05 online)

Strongest Brand

  • Vega – Sport Performance Protein – Chocolate

Nutritional details: 30g protein, 6g carbs, 3g fat, 160 calories, 2g fiber, 1g sugar

Proteins:

  • Pea Protein
  • Cocoa Powder
  • Pumpkin Seed Protein
  • Organic Sunflower Seed Protein
  • Alfalfa Protein

Summary: Contains no soy, some organic ingredients, and six grams of BCAAs.  It also has performance ingredients like tart cherry, turmeric, and probiotics. It tastes good and mixes easily. This is the most heavily advertised vegan protein powder on the market – this stuff is like Starbucks, you’ll see it everywhere.

Approximate cost per serving: $2.75 retail (as low as $2.20 online)

Best Simple Protein Powder

  • Yuve – Cocoa and Raw Chia Seeds

Nutritional details: 16g protein, 18g carbs, 2g fat, 155 calories, 4g fiber, 2g sugar

Proteins:

  • Pea Protein
  • Brown Rice Protein

Summary: This has a ton of plant-based nutrition in the form of energy-boosting foods: Chia Seeds, Maca Root Powder, Coconut Water Powder, Chlorella, Spinach Leaf, Spirulina Algae, Collards Kale Leaf, Alfalfa Sprout, Broccoli Plant. The chia seeds add a different texture that can be enjoyable for some. If you prefer a smoother mixture, this may not be for you.

Approximate cost per serving: $3.33

Creative Ways to Use Protein Powder

For vegetarian bodybuilders and athletes, finding the best vegan protein powder is important. They are a convenient way to help successfully dial in your macros by fulfilling your protein quota for the day. Simply mix some powder with water or a plant-based milk and hit the road.

Mix some protein powder in oatmeal for a quick power-breakfast. It’s also pretty easy to make homemade vegan protein bars and bites. Or you can add protein powder to cookies, brownies, pancakes, cookies, and other baked goods.

3 Truths About Vegan Protein Powder

1.  Vegan protein powder can meet the needs of everyday people, athletes, bikini competitors, and bodybuilders alike.

Each type of protein has a unique composition and digestibility value. This determines how effective they are in supporting protein synthesis (the process that builds muscle). It’s true that single-sourced, animal-based proteins have higher biologic values and protein efficiency ratios than single-sourced, plant-based proteins.

However, a mixture of plant-based proteins can supply the required variation of amino acids to support muscle growth. Some vegetarian foods like quinoa are even good by themselves because they’re a complete protein and can go toe-to-toe with meat any day of the week.

2. Vegan protein powder (in a shake) consumed throughout the day is a good idea, but it’s not a must. 

I have heard the topic of timing argued effectively on both ends. Common sense tells me that feeding my body nourishment throughout the day seems like a good idea. My body tells me it’s more energetic when I do this, as well.

Some of us don’t have the working conditions that allow food breaks every two hours, and to those folks, I say that it’s not the end of the world if you have to get all of your nutrition in three meals versus six.

3.  Vegan protein powder is more sustainable than animal-based protein powder.

Overwhelmingly, the scientific community agrees that plant-based diets are more sustainable and environmentally-friendly than those that include animal-based products. Vegetarianism is simply easier on the planet, and it’s hard to argue against this when looking at all the research.

How to Choose a Vegan Protein Powder?

1. Choose bioavailable (easily absorbed) plant-based proteins.

Examples:

  • Quinoa (soaked)
  • Beans (soaked)
  • Brown rice
  • Sprouted tofu

2. Choose multi-sourced, plant-based protein powders.

Some powders only use one source (e.g. soy, rice, etc.) versus brands like Garden of Life (13 different sprouts) that use several sources.

3. Consume about 20-40 grams of vegan protein powder in the morning/afternoon/evening or after a workout.

If you’re a vegetarian bodybuilder (any form of one), then odds are, you will need to supplement with plant-based protein powder to balance out your targeted macronutrient ratios. This is just the tool to do that!

Because most vegetarian whole foods that are used as protein sources (e.g. quinoa, beans, etc.) also have carbs, it can be easy to get too many carbs if whole foods are your only source of protein, especially if you’re a guy like me who weighs 220lb. Not to mention, if you’re trying to lose fat and lean out, you will need even fewer carbs.

Q: Is Soy Bad for You?

No, and it’s especially useful for a vegetarian or vegan bodybuilding diet.

I wanted to bring you the latest research on soy protein and compare it to whey protein, and then attempt to simplify the big controversy over soy as a good or bad source of protein for vegetarian bodybuilders.

First, I like to reiterate a point I make throughout this website: how much protein you need depends on a few variables, but your activity level is certainly one of the most important factors.

For those who don’t train, the recommendation for healthy adults is 0.36 g per pound of body mass. For example, a 200 lb. person would need approximately 72 grams a day to prevent protein deficiency.

This, however, isn’t optimal for us vegetarian bodybuilders and athletes who train hard and eat plants.

Our tribe needs to ramp things up to 0.9-1.0 g/lb. of body mass.

So the 200 lb. person would need approximately 180-200 g of protein per day.

*Important Note: If you are 200 lb. and want to build up to 210 lb., you will want to consume as much protein as a 210 lb. person to get there.

Chances are, you have heard that a high protein consumption is harmful to the kidneys; that is a flat-out myth. In healthy people, typical protein intakes don’t create a health risk. Even a relatively high protein intake (up 1.2 g/lb.) doesn’t seem to impair kidney and renal function in people with healthy kidneys.

In particular, plant proteins appear to be exceptionally safe.

Soy vs. Whey Protein

Whey comes out on top, but it doesn’t mean that soy is a poor choice.

In fact, I recommend using both soy protein and whey protein in your meal plan if you’re a vegetarian bodybuilder.

Soy protein and whey protein are both staple supplements that bodybuilders need to help increase total protein intake, especially as a lacto vegetarian.

The bottom line is, they both have their respective health benefits for building muscle and strength.

However, whey protein appears to come out on top. This is likely related to its fast absorption rate and amino acid profile.

What Is Whey?

Whey (milk plasma) is by definition, “the liquid remaining after milk has been curdled and strained.”

It is a by-product from cheese manufacturing and from the production of casein. No matter how you slice it, whey comes from animal milk.

It is not plant-based, and there is no such thing as a non-dairy version, even though you can find whey protein powders labelled as “lactose-free.”

It’s worth noting that whey is the second most allergenic milk protein next to casein, and it’s even possible to be allergic to whey but not casein. If you have a sensitivity to milk, your body may not react well to whey either.

What’s in a Soy Bean?

Concerning protein content, the soybean is roughly 40 percent protein. And the PDCAA score (a measure of protein quality) for soybeans is just below 1.0, with soy protein isolate at 1.0. As 1.0 is the highest score a protein can get, soy mostly holds its own with milk, beef, and egg proteins.

The ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fat in soybeans is about 1:7, which is desirable especially compared to oils from peanuts, which are 1:100+.

When breaking down the specific amino acids, soy is rich in branched chain amino acids, lysine, and arginine. What this boils down to is that is soy protein has a full amino acid profile. However, due to the lower methionine and cysteine content, some experts consider soy mildly inferior to animal-based proteins.

Finally, soybeans contain a mix of slow-digesting carbohydrates. The fiber and starches promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the digestive system.

Today’s Soy Is Mutated

Soy was initially grown in North American to feed animals. It didn’t become a human food crop until the early 1900s. This is where the plot thickens – the soy crops grown today are a mutated version of the original.

By this, I mean 90 percent of the soybeans produced today are genetically modified; they are mostly designed to protect the crops against insects and chemicals that prevent weed growth.

Indeed, between 2000 and 2007, United States food manufacturers introduced over 2,700 new foods with soy as an ingredient. And most of the soy foods being sold in North American are heavily processed.

Concerned About Soy Phytoestrogens?

Bodybuilders and athletes have concerns regarding the phytoestrogens (estrogen-like nutrients) in soy and if it will negatively affect their hormones, body composition, and ability to make gains. I know I was certainly one of those who raised an eyebrow at the flood of media that hyped up this topic.

Like many things, there seems to be some truth to the hype, but it’s not what it has been made out to be. Here’s the real deal: Phytoestrogens are a group of natural estrogen receptor modulators found in various foods, with soy being at the forefront.

When soy protein isolates and concentrates are manufactured from soybeans, the phytoestrogens are diminished from the extraction process that involves the alcohol used. This is why I believe the powders worked well in the above studies.

The UK Committee on Toxicity (2003) noted that phytoestrogens bind weakly to the sex-hormone binding proteins and are unlikely to prevent estrogen or androgen binding (at normal blood levels).

It is worth pointing out that when it comes to our biochemistry, there’s no clear-cut explanation for determining how any particular food or chemical will function in the body.

Some people can die from eating peanuts. In other words, it boils down to the amount of soy consumed and genetics.

And on a somewhat related topic, there are no known adverse effects on the quality of sperm; your boys will swim just fine.

Soy Supplementation Is a Solid Choice

Soy does not appear to significantly affect testosterone levels in moderation (to be safe, 1-2 servings of soy food daily, and seems to be able to adversely affect testosterone levels when super-loaded.

I’ve read studies that demonstrate protein powders, whether soy or whey blend, in tandem with strength training, showed no significant differences regarding testosterone or body fat between the groups.

Soy protein appears to be as effective as other protein powders across the board when it comes to gains in the gym. In one study, the authors concluded that 12 weeks of soy protein supplementation (50 grams per day) was as effective as other protein types when it comes to boosting muscle mass during a strength training program.

Notice that I keep reiterating that these findings are attached to strength training because it is a crucial qualifier to these statements.

And what about the anti-nutrient claims? Phytic acid and trypsin inhibitors? No worries, they are deactivated by cooking or fermentation and therefore won’t inhibit protein and mineral absorption.

Whey vs. Soy Protein Summary

The take home message is this:

Don’t eat soy all day long; exceeding three servings per day on a regular basis can work against you. Whole soybeans, soy milks, tofu, tempeh, and miso are solid options.

Protein powder is an excellent choice, and a reasonable amount of unrefined soy intake is fine. And always consume protein before and after training to ensure optimal healing, recovery, and gains.

Remember, you really can’t go wrong with whole, unprocessed foods; where problems occur is with processed foods.

To get more ideas about vegan protein powder, watch this video – Best High Protein Powder | How to Make the Ultimate, Lean Protein Powder at Home?

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Vegan Protein Powder for Bodybuilding

Beta-Alanine for Bodybuilding – Beta-Alanine Side Effects and Benefits


Beta-Alanine for Bodybuilding - Beta-alanine enhances performance by increasing exercise capacity and decreasing muscle fatigue. It also has antioxidant, immune-enhancing and anti-aging properties. You can get beta-alanine from foods that contain carnosine or through supplements. The recommended dose is 2–5 grams daily.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

What is beta-alanine?

Beta-alanine* is a modified version of the amino acid alanine.

Beta-alanine is the building block of carnosine, a molecule that helps to buffer acid in muscles, increasing physical performance in the 60-240 second range.

Carnosine appears to be an anti-oxidant and anti-aging compound.

Structurally, beta-alanine is a hybrid between the potent neurotransmitters L-glycine and GABA, which may explain why bodybuilders often claim to experience a caffeine-like boost from it.

According to Bodybuilding.com, beta-alanine is even gaining support within the scientific community for also being classified as a neurotransmitter.

*Please don’t confuse with L-Alanine.

How does it work?

When beta-alanine is ingested, it turns into the molecule carnosine, which acts as an acid buffer in the body. Carnosine is stored in cells, and released in response to drops in pH.

Increased stores of carnosine can protect against diet-induced drops in pH (which might occur from ketone production in ketosis, for example), as well as offer protection from exercise-induced lactic acid production.

I take beta-alanine with a serving of coffee as a highly effective pre-workout cocktail, and it’s one of the few sports supplements* I take. I use the NOW brand.

*Like most sports supplements, there have been only a few well-designed clinical studies on beta-alanine.

Beta-Alanine Benefits

  • Increases lean muscle mass.
  • Enhances muscular strength and output. I tend to crank out another 2-3 additional reps during my high-intensity sets.
  • Delays muscular fatigue (train harder, longer)
  • Improves cardiovascular exercise performance, like HITT or sprinting.

Who/what can benefit from beta-alanine?

  • Men and women.
  • Bodybuilders and powerlifters.
  • CrossFit athletes, MMA fighters, military personal, or any high-intensity training.
  • Runners, cyclists, football players, tennis players, or virtually any athletic sport.
  • Anyone who needs to breakthrough a training plateau.

Beta-Alanine Side Effects

Beta-alanine may cause a tingling* feeling called paresthesia.

This tingling is harmless. To some (who take higher doses), it is unpleasant, but personally, I like the sensation when it occurs.

Beta-Alanine Myths Debunked

Myth: Beta-alanine buffers lactic acid.

No, beta-alanine buffers H+*, not lactic acid. It is the H+ that are released from our energy systems, AS WELL as being released from lactic acid that causes muscular fatigue and performance problems. It is not lactic acid itself, or the leftover lactate ions as many incorrectly believe.

(*H= Proton

When the Hydrogen atom loses an electron all that is left is a proton. It becomes the positively charged hydrogen ion known as H+. This is the form of Hydrogen that produces the ATP enzyme that powers our cells and mitochondria.

The H+ hydrogen ion is the basis of the pH scale.)

Myth: If I don’t feel the tingling, beta-alanine must not be working.

The tingling sensation does not occur with all individuals, no matter how much they take. Also taking carbs with beta-alanine can play a role in blocking the sensations. However, research shows that taking carbohydrates with beta-alanine can increase gains faster.

Myth: Taking taurine* with beta-alanine will stop the beta-alanine from working.

I have read that since beta-alanine and taurine compete for uptake, and that it’s ideal to either not take them together or consume one of them consistently while dosing the other.

On the surface it may seem like a bad stack, however there are quite a few studies that show little to no difference in carnosine concentrations. In other words, taurine does not appear to inhibit beta-alanine from being absorbed on a significant level, otherwise carnosine levels would have been lower in the beta-alanine + taurine studies.

Muscle fibers play a role as well.

Another key point to mention is that carnosine is more concentrated in type II muscle fibers, while taurine is more concentrated in type I muscle fibers. This further decreases the potential for competitive uptake.

*Taurine is an amino acid important in the metabolism of fats. It’s also an antioxidant that’s important for blood glucose utilization, and neuromuscular, cognitive, and lung function.

To find out more about Beta-Alanine for Bodybuilding, watch this video – How to Use Beta Alanine For Muscle Gains – Benefits, When and What to Take | Tiger Fitness

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Beta-Alanine for Bodybuilding

VEGAN MACROS AND THE MEAT-PROTEIN MYTH DEBUNKED


It’s a myth that you can’t get enough of vegan macros in a vegan bodybuilding diet. If you eat enough of the right calories and protein, train hard, and get enough sleep, you will build muscle as a vegetarian or vegan.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

It’s a myth that you can’t get your macros in a vegan bodybuilding diet.

If you eat enough of the right calories and protein, train hard, and get enough sleep, you will build muscle as a vegetarian or vegan

Plant-based nutrition clearly has long-term health benefits compared to consuming meat the way traditional bodybuilders do. Nevertheless, many bodybuilders hesitate in making this positive lifestyle switch because they have been misinformed, and old paradigms take a while to shift.

Therefore, I will address the following concerns/questions:

Can Muscle Be Gained via a Vegetarian Bodybuilding Diet?

Most definitely, yes. Consider these four different variations of vegetarianism:

  • Lacto-ovo Vegetarians (diary and eggs are permitted)
  • Lacto-vegetarians (dairy is permitted)
  • Ovo-vegetarians (eggs permitted)
  • Vegan (no animal products permitted)

These two are technically not vegetarian, but I still consider them part of the “family”:

  • Pescatarians (fish is permitted)
  • Flexitarians (some meat is permitted)

Each sub-group has its own unique challenges to build muscle mass. It is important for vegetarian bodybuilders to be aware of their respective challenges. The main points are to consume enough calories and protein and assess any deficiencies in order to build muscle successfully.

For instance, it’s easier to build more muscle mass from a lacto-ovo vegetarian bodybuilding meal plan than a vegan one. Egg protein offers substantial nutritional benefits (dairy, not so much). Vegan bodybuilders can still build muscular bodies without question, but they will have the hardest time building size.

Calories

Vegan diets in particular tend to be low in calories for obvious reasons (e.g. a salad vs. a 1/4 pounder with cheese). To build muscle mass with vegan macros, you have to pay special attention to calorie intake. That is, you need to consume more calories than you metabolically burn during and after exercise.

The macronutrients within your diet are the main energy providers, and the amount of energy required depends on your exercise regime, exercise efficiency, gender, genetics, and non-exercise habits.

McArdle (2010) reported that a cohort of male bodybuilders increased muscle mass and size and reduced % body fat on a diet of about 18-23 calories/per pound of body weight per day.

The higher end of the calorie intake was highlighted in highly trained athletes compared to novice bodybuilders; again, experimenting with your calorie intake to build muscle is highly recommended, along with consuming the right macro/calorie ratio.

A suggestion is to experiment with the amount of calories that you consume, as this will be a major factor in terms of muscle gain. Reduced calories = reduced muscle gain, and increased calories = increased % body fat.

It’s also very important to regularly assess your % body fat, as an increment could mean that you’re eating too many calories or the wrong types of macros.

Protein

Proteins are hugely important for any vegetarian bodybuilder and have the following functions within the body:

  • Supports growth and maintenance of body tissues
  • Synthesizes enzymes, hormones, and other peptides
  • Builds antibodies
  • Maintains fluid and electrolyte balance
  • Repairs exercise-associated muscle damage
  • Provides energy and glucose

A solid alternative to using whey protein are pea and soy protein. Soy proteins are a quick and dramatic method of boosting your overall protein content, and they are very convenient to use.

For those of us who aren’t vegan bodybuilders, egg protein is arguably the best option, as it is more predictable than whey protein in terms of ingredients. Some plant-based nutrition companies produce their own brand of mixed plant and grain proteins to build muscle.

An article from Men’s Health states:

“The protein in eggs has the highest biological value—a measure of how well it supports your body’s protein needs—of any food, including our beloved beef. Calorie for calorie, you need less protein from eggs than you do from other sources to achieve the same muscle-building benefits.”

Again, do your homework via some solid research, as this process will help you with your unique dietary needs whilst building muscle. Other options include pea and hemp proteins, which are also high in proteins and easy to digest and absorb.

A well-balanced, protein-rich diet is the key for building muscle mass, but caution should be applied if you are predominately getting your main source of macros from processed or junk foods, e.g. noodles, potato chips, and sugary sweets.

Such products are extremely counter-productive to muscle growth and in the long term, will cause major health implications and increase % body fat due to the high simple carb and fat content.

There is evidence to suggest that increased body fat hinders muscle growth via an increase in insulin resistance. Insulin controls the glucose levels within your body, which is highly anabolic and needed for muscle growth.

Conversely, if you are eating a lot of leafy salads, stir fries, fresh fruit, and vegetable-based meals, you might be falling short with the macronutrients required. To build muscle on a vegan bodybuilding diet, you must add healthy fats or proteins with every vegetable consumed during each meal.

Try to eat six small meals per day following these simple rules, and combine your carbs with beans, legumes, chick peas, tempeh, soya beans, quinoa, brown rice, and tofu to boost the protein content of the meal.

Also, think about adding beans and lentils, avocados, nuts, flax seeds, and walnuts as an excellent source of free fatty acids, and avoid vegetable oils and hydrogenated and hidden trans fats.

Natural peanut butter is also a brilliant source of essential free fatty acids and an excellent boost to your calorie intake, which again is the forward for packing on that desired muscle.

Essential free fatty acids help with fast muscle recovery from high-intensity exercise, help with hormone production, increase metabolism, and support a healthy cardiovascular, immune, and brain function.

Vegan Macros According to the Pros

Robert Cheeke (founder of Vegan Bodybuilding and Fitness) offers some great advice about macro-nutrient percentages:

“The exact percentages may change daily based on diet. They also vary per individual based on factors such as your food preferences, your rate of metabolism (your body’s ability to burn fat), and your specific athletic goals.

“Though it may not be common to consume a lot of food, eating every two to three hours, for athletes training up to hours a day, it becomes a higher focus and a bigger part of everyday life. It’s not extremely challenging either, it just takes some dedication, focus, planning and preparation.”

“I personally enjoy eating frequently throughout the day. My meals tend to be a bit smaller and I get to incorporate a lot of variety, flavors and themes because I am eating more frequently than just three or four meals a day.”

Deryn Macey (strength and conditioning coach) said she needed to switch to high-protein whole grains to dial-in her vegan macros:

“I have no problem with white rice but with my new goals, it doesn’t provide the right protein to carbohydrate ratio for me.

“Switching to grains like bulgur, barley, amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat and other higher protein grains will help me stay within my carbohydrate goals while still hitting 160 grams of protein.”

Shannon Clark (certified personal trainer) reminds us that salads alone won’t cut it:

“If you’re the type of vegetarian who gets full on things like brown rice, quinoa, potatoes, legumes, beans and lentils, nuts, seeds, nut butters, and avocados, you’ve given yourself a good chance to build some muscle.

“On the other hand, if you’re a vegetarian who feasts mostly on salad, stir-fry, fresh fruit, and other vegetable-based dishes, you’re likely falling short on your macro needs. For every vegetable you eat, pair it with a healthy fat and protein-packed side. This provides the balance of nutrition you need!”

Monitor More Than Vegan Macros

Macronutrient and vitamin deficiencies have to be monitored, not only for building muscle but also for general well-being. Add non-heme iron to your diet by including spinach, kale, and collard, which are dark leafy green vegetables.

Don’t be afraid to mix and match your food choices by adding dried peas, beans, lentils, artichokes, and dried fruit, which again are rich in iron. Iron supplementation and vitamin B12 is recommended, especially for females during the menstrual cycle (Powers, 2012).

Calcium is required for bone maintenance and plays a vital role in muscle contractions. In the short term, low calcium intake causes muscle cramps, and can hinder performance at the gym (Wilmore & Costill, 2012). Long-term neglect can cause a weak bone structure and osteoporosis.

It is common knowledge that dairy produce is high in calcium, so for the lacto-vegetarian, this is not an issue. However, vegans can consume sufficient calcium from spinach, green collard, kale, broccoli, and almonds.

If you are in doubt that your diet is lacking in calcium, there are plenty of calcium supplements to choose from to give it a boost!

Lack of zinc can hinder growth and development across the body, suppress your appetite, and reduce testosterone levels. A recommended 40mg of zinc per day boosts testosterone, which is the hormone required for muscle growth and development.

Pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, almonds, and fortified oatmeal are high in zinc, so add these foods to your varied vegetarian diet.

For more ideas about vegan macros, watch this video – VEGAN BODYBUILDER & NUTRITIONIST’S SUPER HEALTHY DIET **MACROS REVIEWED**

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Vegan Macros for Bodybuilding

What is the Role of Insulin in Muscle Growth?


The role of insulin in muscle growth is extremely important for muscle building. Insulin is important for promoting uptake of amino acids and enhancing synthesis of protein.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

VEGETARIANS ARE MORE INSULIN SENSITIVE, AN ADVANTAGE IN BUILDING MUSCLE

Vegetarians bodybuilders have many more advantages than you may think.

Much of the nutritional advice that you read about for gaining muscle mass and trying to look more aesthetically sculpted is based around a staple diet of meat and animal-based proteins. This is simply an outdated approach, and the role of the vegetarian diet for building muscle in a healthier manner can no longer be ignored.

Here are some benefits of a plant-based diet for building muscle.

To get “ripped” or “shredded,” you need a percentage body fat between 6-8%, and it is common dialogue that an excellent physique is created mostly in the kitchen, rather than the gym.

For argument’s sake, let’s just say both are extremely important. McArdle, et al. (2010) reported that a staple healthy diet of low glycaemic carbs, such as vegetables, nuts, and some fruits, supported an anabolic fat loss state and reduced percentage body fat and obesity related diseases within vegetarians.

This was supported by Kim (2012), who compared the impact of a long-term vegetarian diet to an omnivore diet. The results were quite encouraging in terms of health parameters for the vegetarian cohort, as there was a reduction in percentage body fat, oxidative stress, blood cholesterol levels, and insulin resistance.

These factors are hugely important to sustaining general health, staving off many chronic life-threatening illnesses, as well as building muscle.

Now the question is, why are these processes so important to the vegetarian bodybuilder’s physique and overall health?

The Role of Insulin in Muscle Growth

One of the key hormones within the body for weight management and building muscle mass is insulin.

Insulin’s main function is to reduce the amount of glucose circulating in the blood, and its levels are highest after consuming sugary snacks and/or foods with a high glycemic index. It is important to highlight that insulin is sensitive to the amount of both carbohydrate and protein consumed, but not fat.

This “mopping up” action of insulin inhibits muscle growth, because it starves the muscle of glucose and redirects it to the liver to be stored as fat. As such, your cells need to be as insulin-sensitive as possible in order to increase the anabolic effect of food and training.

Too much insulin in the body increases percentage body fat. Wilmore & Costill (2010) reported that insulin resistance is actually increased when your percentage body fat and bodyweight are raised.

Kim (2012) stated that vegetarians have a lower percentage body fat and insulin resistance than omnivores, backing up the statement by Wilmore & Costill. 

Eating low energy density vegetables, fruit, whole grains, legumes, and nuts—which are all major sources of nutrition within the vegetarian bodybuilder’s diet—is a key factor in better control of blood sugars and insulin sensitivity.

This improved blood sugar control has a positive connection with the fact that vegetarians have a lower incidence rate of type 2 diabetes and its associated complications when compared to omnivores.

A strict vegan diet has the added bonus of being cholesterol-free, low in saturated fat, and high in soluble fiber. This sets the stage to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and certain cancers.

Sharon (2013) also reported that vegetarians consumed less calories than omnivores, and since excess calories consumed are stored as fat, that causes fat cells to increase in size.

Consequently, a growing fat cell itself becomes insulin resistant, and the resulting free fatty acids will cause the body to favor the use of fat for energy at the expense of glucose.

This becomes a vicious cycle, with the overweight condition leading to insulin resistance, which in turn leads to impaired glucose use. As such, blood sugar, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure all raise.

To make matters worse, the impaired ability of glucose to enter muscle cells keeps the glycogen stores lower than normal, which increases the person’s appetite and their motivation to eat more, thereby increasing fat stores and reducing lean muscle mass.

However, a plant-based diet that is rich in fats from nuts (e.g. almonds) is also high in unsaturated fats, which increase good cholesterol in the blood and reduce cardiovascular disease. These “good fats” are essential for digestive processes, cell membrane structure and function, and satiety, and act as carriers of vitamins A and D. These vitamins essentially reduce oxidative stress and certain forms of cancer.

Omnivores tend to eat more saturated and trans-fatty acids, which are energy-rich at nine calories per gram; these bad fats are associated with heart disease because they raise the low density lipoproteins in the blood.

Some experts are now stating that high-protein diets are a big scam.

I have read compelling research on both sides of the debate about how much protein we need.

I lean more on the side of more protein is better if you are training hard in the gym. We simply have different needs than the average person who doesn’t participate in regular exercise. And it appears that high-protein diets are safe for the kidneys, after all.

One interesting scenario that necessitates more research is how prisoners can get so muscular on a seemingly deficient diet. They survive on fairly small amounts of low-quality protein you wouldn’t feed your dog.

What is clear to me is that you need a calorie surplus to build muscle, and a plant-based diet high in good fats (e.g. nuts, oils, and avocados) and proteins, with calorie cycling of starchy carbs, is an optimal formula to build muscle.

Conclusion

The role of insulin in muscle growth is extremely important for muscle building.

Insulin is important for promoting uptake of amino acids and enhancing synthesis of protein.

Vegetarians are more insulin-sensitive, which is an advantage in building muscle, and also have reduced associated chronic health risks and lower BMI, percentage body fat, oxidative stress, and blood cholesterol levels.

For more ideas about the role of insulin in muscle growth, watch this video – 6 Clinically Proven Ways To Improve Insulin Sensitivity To Build Muscle & Lose Fat

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Role of Insulin in Muscle Growth

HOW TO AVOID VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AS A VEGETARIAN BODYBUILDER


Avoid Vitamin Deficiencies as a Vegetarian Bodybuilder - Athletes who are vegetarian must pay even closer attention to their vitamin intake, since their bodies undergo more stress and exertion than the average person. Let’s examine a few vitamin deficiencies common among vegetarians and what you can do to maintain sufficient blood levels of these crucial vitamins.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

Vegetarian bodybuilding diets should focus on getting enough of the critical vitamins and nutrients in their diets.

Since vitamin B-12 is not naturally produced by either plants or animals, it needs to be closely monitored by vegetarians. In addition to B-12, there are several other critical vitamins that must be present in the blood to provide the nutrients your body needs for daily performance.

Athletes who are vegetarian must pay even closer attention to their vitamin intake, since their bodies undergo more stress and exertion than the average person.

Let’s examine a few vitamin deficiencies common among vegetarians and what you can do to maintain sufficient blood levels of these crucial vitamins. When you deprive your body of the vitamins it needs to perform at the gym, you’re putting it at risk of developing more serious health conditions.

Vitamin B-12 Deficiency

People can become vitamin B-12 deficient for a variety of reasons: old age, use of antacids, side effects of prescription medications, bacterial infections, and meatless diets.

According to Dr. Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, bacteria are responsible for producing vitamin B-12, and plants and animals only get vitamin B-12 when contaminated by this strand of bacteria.

Vitamin B-12 is essential to your health for:

Vitamin B-12 is incredibly important during pregnancy and lactation for infants, as well as for athletes who push their bodies to the limit. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends vitamin B-12 supplement tablets or monthly vitamin B-12 shots to treat severe cases of deficiency.

Pernicious Anemia

A lack of vitamin B-12 can lead to a condition known as pernicious anemia, which is characterized by a lack of healthy red blood cells and enlargement of existing cells.

According to the National Institutes of Health, this condition occurs when the body destroys cells that make a special protein, intrinsic factor, which is released by cells in the stomach. Red blood cells are essential because they provide oxygen to the body’s tissues.

Although symptoms are often mild or nonexistent, NIH suggests that the following symptoms can be associated with both vitamin B-12 deficiency and pernicious anemia:

  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Fatigue or paleness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Shortness of breath during exercise
  • Swollen red tongue or bleeding gums
  • Confusion or depression
  • Numbness or tingling of the extremities

Vegetarians who spend a great deal of time in the gym may notice a decrease in energy and motivation when their B-12 levels are low. Fortunately, there are healthy ways to boost those levels back up.

Vitamin D Deficiency

Vegetarians, people who have milk allergies, and those who don’t get enough sunlight could be at risk of vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D is essential in building and repairing strong bones, because it helps the body utilize dietary calcium.

Low levels of the vitamin have been associated with cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment in elderly adults, severe asthma in children, cancer, and diabetes. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, the average person needs between 1,000 and 2,000 IU of vitamin D per day from the sun, diet, and supplements.

Researchers at Harvard also suggested that the elderly, people with dark skin, and those who are obese can benefit the most from vitamin D supplements. People living in northern latitudes (anyone living north of an imaginary line drawn from San Francisco to Philadelphia in America) can benefit from supplements between the months of October and February.

Spending time exercising outdoors in sunlight is one of the best natural ways to boost vitamin D in your body.

Vegetarians who are physically active can also benefit from vitamin D supplements. The best way to measure if you have a vitamin D deficiency is by taking a 25-hydroxy vitamin D blood test. Healthy people have levels of 30 ng/mL to 74 ng/ML, and levels below this range indicate a deficiency. Read more about the test at A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia on PubMed Health.

Calcium Deficiency

Calcium helps the body maintain strong bones and teeth. The Dietitian’s Guide to Vegetarian Diets cites 45 medical studies that have examined the calcium intakes of vegetarians.

Although milk and dairy foods are most often associated with calcium, dark green vegetables are great sources of calcium when consumed in high quantities.

Effects Upon Bodybuilders and Athletes

Since bodybuilders, fitness enthusiasts, and athletes work off a higher percentage of the foods they eat, these individuals must pay even closer attention to their daily vitamin intake. If you have a vitamin B-12 deficiency, you may feel fatigue and a lack of physical energy. If you have a vitamin D deficiency, you may experience bone pain and muscle weakness.

Both of these deficiencies have been linked to cardiovascular problems, so your heart could have trouble keeping up with you during strenuous workouts. The Health Science Center at the University of Florida suggests that vegetarians can boost their heart health by planning their diets wisely.

Vegetarian athletes should bulk up their vitamin B-12 intake with fortified cereals and soy, rice, or almond milk for heart health. Vegetarians can also keep their hearts healthy with plant-based omega-3 fatty acid foods like soy, broccoli, and cauliflower.

Vitamin B-12 deficiency is also linked to low bone density, which is needed to support prolonged exercise. According to a “New York Times” health guide, excessive exercise, such as that performed by marathon runners, can lead to iron loss and a specific type of anemia.

Although dried beans and green vegetables contain lots of iron, it is often less easily absorbed than the type of iron contained in meat. Therefore, vegetarian athletes need to ensure that they are eating enough iron-rich foods to compensate for their high level of exercise.

Blood Type and Diet

After the book of naturopath physician, Peter D’Adamo, Eat Right 4 Your Type, was published in 1996, people began considering the link between blood type and diet. According to his blood type diet recommendations, people with Type A blood (39% of the population) are best suited for vegetarianism. Meanwhile, people with Type O blood (46% of the population) are genetically predisposed to require meat, and people with Type B blood are somewhere in the middle.

Like any nutritional recommendation, the blood type diet has its fair share of critics.

However, you may want to consider your blood type when planning out your vegetarian meals. If you have Type O blood in particular, you should look into supplementing your vegetarian diet with the aforementioned crucial vitamins.

Meatless Foods Rich in Vitamin B-12

  • Eggs
  • Soy milk
  • Yogurt
  • Red Star T-6635+ brand nutritional yeast
  • Wheat gluten and soybean-based meat substitutes
  • Organically-grown spinach
  • Vitamin B-12 fortified breakfast cereals
  • Spirulina (vegan)

Meatless Foods Rich in Vitamin D

  • Milk fortified with vitamin D
  • Orange juice fortified with vitamin D
  • Egg yolks
  • White and shiitake mushrooms
  • Tofu
  • Oatmeal

Meatless Foods Rich in Calcium

  • Tempeh
  • Almond butter
  • Kale
  • Soy milk
  • Dried beans
  • Chocolate pudding
  • Broccoli
  • Turnips

Summary

Vitamin B-12 and vitamin D are not frequently found in foods, and even less frequently in vegetarian-friendly foods. Therefore, vegetarians are advised to supplement their diets with these two vitamins, at a minimum.

The Mayo Clinic suggests that vegetarians pay close attention to these dietary nutrients as well:

Dr. Nancy Lonsdorf, MD, who practices in Iowa, refers to vitamin B-12 as “the energy vitamin” because it is critical for so many bodily functions. Vitamin B-12 is necessary for energy production, DNA synthesis, nerve communication, and blood formation. Anemia caused by lack of vitamin B-12 and iron results in lower capacity for exercise, preventing you from reaching your fitness potential.

Fortunately, vitamin deficiencies are preventable and treatable, especially when detected early. Pay close attention to how your body feels when you’re at the gym and during times of rest. And keep in mind: the more variety you bring to your vegetarian diet, the more likely you’ll be able to meet all your nutritional needs.

For more ideas to avoid vitamin deficiencies as a vegetarian bodybuilder, watch this video – How to Prevent Deficiencies on a Vegan Diet

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Avoid Vitamin Deficiencies as a Vegetarian Bodybuilder

WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN VEGAN BODYBUILDING SUPPLEMENTS AND PROTEIN POWDERS


Highly-effective advertising has hypnotized us to believe that we need supplements. Whether you’re a competitive athlete or bodybuilder, casual fitness enthusiast or gym rat, we have been conditioned to take powders and pills to get ahead. In this article, we discuss what to look for in vegan bodybuilding supplements and protein powders so you can make better choice
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

Bodybuilding supplements are a multi-billion-dollar industry that’s growing every year. Because of the growth and explosion of choices, making sense of all this is increasingly more difficult.

Highly-effective advertising has hypnotized us to believe that we need supplements. Whether you’re a competitive athlete or bodybuilder, casual fitness enthusiast or gym rat, we have been conditioned to take powders and pills to get ahead.

Most plant-based diets can benefit from the right kind of supplementation (healthy skepticism aside), and some vegan bodybuilding supplements do have merit.

In this article, we discuss what to look for in vegan bodybuilding supplements and protein powders so you can make better choice

What Performance and Bodybuilding Supplements Can Do for You?

Whether you’re plant-based or not, every athlete and bodybuilder needs the correct balance and blend of macronutrients (protein, carbs, and fats).

If you eat enough calories and the correct ratio of macros, train hard, and get enough sleep, you will build muscle as a vegetarian or vegan.

In addition to these nutrients, which you can obtain from food alone, there are some performance and bodybuilding supplements that may give you an edge in the gym or on the field.

Vegan BCAA supplements (branched chain amino acids), the primary force behind muscle repair and building, can also help reduce muscle soreness after intense training sessions.

This means vegan BCAAs can help you build muscle with less downtime between workouts.

One of the other popular bodybuilding supplements on the market an amino acid called creatine*.

*Creatine monohydrate is one of the only supplements that consistently demonstrate some effectiveness in performance.

And it happens that the only food source of creatine happens to be meat, so vegans and vegetarians tend to have lower muscle creatine stores than their meat-eating counterparts.

By supplementing your plant-based diet with creatine, you can enhance your ability to build lean muscle and strength.

Vegan Bodybuilding Supplements

The type of supplement that’s best for you depends on what your fitness goals are and how intensely you train. If you’re just aiming to tone up a little and get in shape, you probably don’t need to buy supplements.

Yes, I just said that. But then again, I’m not a supplement company trying to sell you… supplements.

However, if you’re intensely getting after it in the gym and/or training for competition it might be worth it to get supplements like Vegan BCAA and creatine.

When searching for vegan bodybuilding supplements, here are a few things to look for:

  • Natural and/or non-GMO ingredients and food sources
  • Absence of dairy and egg ingredients
  • Grams of supplement per serving and amount of servings (cost per serving ratio)
  • Ingredients* you can pronounce

*Typically the fewer ingredients, the better. Means less processing.

To learn more about supplementation, please read through our Guide to Vegan Bodybuilding Supplements.

Vegan Protein Powders

More and more professional athletes and bodybuilders are taking up plant-based fitness and doing extremely well. As a result, more supplement companies are offering plant-based protein in their product lines.

In fact, go to Whole Foods sometime and look at the protein powder section. You will notice 50-60 percent of the shelf space these days is filled with vegan protein powders.

Here are some key components of vegan protein powders to look for:

  • Multi-sourced plant-based protein products, a blend of different proteins
  • Organic sprouts like chia seeds, pumpkin seeds, quinoa, and lentils
  • Minimal processing
  • Favorable customer reviews about the taste and how the powder mixes

Vegan Bodybuilding Supplements vs. Food

The truth is that you probably don’t need any bodybuilding supplements if you’re eating the right foods. But few of us can keep up with the “perfect diet,” and supplements can help pick up the slack.

For many vegan and vegetarian bodybuilders and athletes, supplements can make up for missed nutritional opportunities and add convenience for meal planning.

However, everyone’s digestive system and biochemistry processes supplements differently. For instance, creatine doesn’t do anything for me but it has done wonders for many of my friends, so trial* and error is required.

*Keeping up with a daily food journal is essential in this process.

It’s certainly worth mentioning that the placebo effect is live and well!  So keep an honest assessment of your supplement regimen, workout plan, and overall gains in a journal to determine if supplements are really making a difference for you (observe over 6-12 months).

Just because a multi-billion-dollar industry says you need them to reach your fitness goals doesn’t mean that you necessarily do.

For topics related to vegan bodybuilding supplements and protein powders, watch this video – You’re Wasting Your Money!!!

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Vegan Bodybuilding Supplements and Protein Powders

VEGETARIAN PROTEIN POWDERS – HOW TO GET COMPLETE PROTEINS


Protein powder can be a great ally in this journey bodybuilding and athleticism. In this article, we wanted to make things easier for you and break down the best vegetarian protein powders. Read on to find out more.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

One of the major concerns vegetarian bodybuilders and athletes face is getting enough protein in their diet. After all, traditionally in Western societies meat and dairy have been the primary source of protein.

This can be problematic if you like to train hard in the gym or on the field and you need a fair amount of protein to repair damaged muscle cells. And if you’re into bodybuilding specifically, you also need protein in order to bulk up or build lean muscle.

Vegetarians need not succumb to eating dairy or other animal-based sources just to get their daily protein needs. Armed with the right knowledge, plant-based proteins can work just as good as meat and dairy every did for you.

In fact, even better when you consider all of the health advantages that come along with it.

Protein powder can be a great ally in this journey bodybuilding and athleticism. We wanted to make things easier for you and break down the best vegetarian protein powders.

1. Soy Protein

This is widely considered as among the highest quality of all plant-based proteins. Soy itself is rich in nutrients. It’s 38% protein and 30% carbohydrates, and it also contains other minerals and vitamins. Soy protein contains the complete essential amino acids. These are all in the right ratios that help with normal growth and development.

Pros: Soy proteins are especially high in glutamine and arginine. These are important amino acids for those who wish to build muscles and increase their testosterone levels naturally. Arginine stimulates the action of the anabolic hormones that promote lean muscle building. Glutamine plays a major role in controlling the negative effects of metabolic stress.

Cons: Soy proteins are also known to have estrogenic effects in the body. If you consume too much, it may lead to high estrogen levels and lower testosterone levels. It is quite difficult to find organic soy products.

2. Pea Protein

This plant-based protein has an excellent amino acid profile. It also contains a good amount of BCAAs (branched chain amino acids) that supports muscle building. These BCAAs are known for their ability to control the amount of muscle breakdown that happens after high-intensity exercises. It also has numerous other benefits such as weight loss and better heart health.

Pros: Pea protein is a hypoallergenic plant-based protein source. It does not create gluten issues like wheat proteins. This is easy on the digestive system. It does not cause any bloating. This is a common side effect from a lot of other plant-based proteins.

This protein may also be an effective way to control appetite. It has numerous peptides that delay the release of ghrelin, a hunger-inducing hormone.

Cons: Pea protein also contains non-essential amino acids, which the body can already produce on its own. Some conditional amino acids are also not found in pea protein. This protein powder has to be mixed with other vegetable protein powders because it is not a complete protein.

3. Sunflower Protein

This is obtained from sunflower seeds. This is especially helpful for improving digestion. It helps with muscle building and repair, and it has antioxidant capacities. Sunflower protein powder is high in fiber and contains no gluten.

Pros: This protein powder is good for people who suffer from nut allergies. Sunflower protein powder tastes good when blended with other vegan products such as banana, mixed berries, rice milk, and oats. The amount of protein is almost comparable to rich non-vegan sources like chicken and beef.

Cons: Sunflower does not have much omega-3, but high in omega-6. This may not suit well when trying to create a healthy ratio between these two essential fatty acids. More omega-6 than omega-3 may cause some health problems.

4. Hemp Protein

Hemp protein powder comes from cold-pressed, then milled hemp seeds. These seeds are rich in healthy oils, especially a good balance of omega-3 and omega-6. It also has all the essential amino acids the body needs.

It provides a good amount of BCAAs such as valine, isoleucine, and leucine. These BCAAs are metabolized within the muscle tissues, resulting in increased endurance, more muscle gains, improved recovery and reduced inflammation and muscle soreness.

Pros: This protein has a nutty flavor. It combines well with almond or coconut milk. Flavor is also good when fruits like bananas are added to it. The proteins are easily digestible, which means that you would not have to deal with side effects like bloating and gas.

Cons: This protein source is a bit more expensive than other vegetarian protein powders.

5. Brown Rice Protein

This vegetarian protein powder contains a good profile of amino acids. It is also full of important B vitamins.

Pros: This is a cheaper option than other vegetable protein powders. It is easily digested and gluten-free.

Cons: Its amino acid profile may be complete, but amounts of lysine are lower compared to whey protein. This is not a complete protein powder, so it has to be mixed with other plant-based proteins. The taste may not also be very friendly.

6. Pumpkin Seed Protein

Of all the commonly eaten nuts and seeds, pumpkin seeds rank the highest in terms of protein content. A 28-gram serving (1 ounce) of pumpkin seeds contain 9 grams of protein. That’s about one-third of the serving size of high-quality plant protein. That amount is also 2 grams more than the protein content of ground beef on a per serving basis.

Pros: Pumpkin seed protein powder is also high in other nutrients. It is full of iron, magnesium, calcium and zinc. These are among the leading essential minerals vital for growth and health. Zinc is needed in protein formation. Iron is important in blood cell formation. Magnesium is important for normal muscle and nerve function. Calcium is essential for strong bones.

Cons: Pumpkin seeds are also high in calories. Consumption should be controlled to avoid getting too many calories to prevent weight gain.

7. Quinoa Protein

This protein powder is an excellent one to add to your diet. Quinoa protein powder contains the essential amino acids. It has an unusual yet excellent, high ratio of proteins to carbohydrates. This makes it a good food to help you feel full longer.

Quinoa is also rich in plant sterols. These are anabolic agents that support lean muscle building and better hormonal balance.

Pros: Quinoa protein is good for people who need or want a gluten-free plant-derived protein. People with wheat allergy may enjoy this protein powder instead. It is also a good choice for those wanting to cut back on calorie intake since it is low in calories.

Cons: The saponins in quinoa may cause some toxicity for sensitive individuals. Check that the quinoa protein powder has been pre-washed, which removes a lot of saponins and most of the bitter taste.

8. Oat-Based Protein

Oat-based proteins are also rich in natural steroids, aside from an impressive roster of other proteins and nutrients.

Pros: This protein source is rich in beta glucans. These compounds help reduce cholesterol levels. Oats are also rich in the minerals selenium and manganese. These minerals are important, powerful antioxidants in the body.

Another good thing with oat-based proteins is its low glycemic index. This means it won’t cause blood glucose to shoot up rapidly and cause insulin problems.

Oat-based proteins are mainly avenins as the major storage protein. This is good news for those who want cereal-based proteins but have a gluten allergy. Oat-based proteins are non-gluten containing.

Cons: The same things mentioned above may also cause the problems that gluten triggers in sensitive individuals. This is not as common as from gluten, though.

9. Nut-Based Protein

These are among the most popular plant-based protein sources. Aside from the excellent amino acid profile, nut-based proteins are also rich in compounds that increase NO (nitric oxide) levels and activity in the body. NO helps in dilating the blood vessels.

This action promotes lower blood pressure and improved blood flow to the tissues. There is also an excellent profile of nutrients such as selenium, magnesium, and zinc. Nuts are also high in fiber that helps curb appetite and make you feel full for longer periods of time. The fats are also good for health and in reducing inflammation. There is a long list of other health benefits from nuts, making these an excellent source of plant proteins.

Pros: Nuts have excellent flavor and are ideal portable snacks. Almond protein powders and other nut-based ones have more pleasant tastes and less of the bitterness common in proteins such as pea powders.

Cons: Nuts are also high in calories so make sure to limit consumption.

How to Get Complete Proteins

As you can see, you have plenty of options for plant-based protein. However, what we recommend is a nut-based protein. If you want to make your own protein powder, you can grind the nuts in a blender  and make a shake quite easily.

Nuts are pretty good for boosting testosterone levels, and some varieties of nuts, such as Brazil nuts, have selenium which boosts hormone production and has positive effects on male fertility.

To ensure getting complete proteins in your diet always opt for multiple sources* of protein-packed foods. Here’s my recommended recipe for a DIY vegetarian protein powder:

  • Brazil nuts
  • Hemp seeds
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Quinoa
  • BCAA powder**

*For maximum nutritional content always use organic foods and ingredients.

**Unless you train for competitions, you probably don’t need supplements if you’re eating a buffet of quality whole foods. 

For more ideas related to vegetarian protein powders, watch this video – Best Homemade Vegan Protein Powder for Weight Loss

Author Bio:

Alex Eriksson is the founder of Anabolic Health, a men’s health blog dedicated to providing honest and research backed advice for optimal male hormonal health. Anabolic Health aspires to become a trusted resource where men can come and learn how to fix their hormonal problems naturally, without pharmaceuticals.

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Can Vegetarian Protein Powders Provide Complete Proteins?

PHASE OUT SUGAR CRAVINGS WITH THESE SUGAR DETOX MEAL PLANS


Sugar Detox Meal Plans – Listed in this article here are some meal plans that can help you to phase sugar out of your diet. Read on to find out more.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

Is sugar harmless?

Health-conscious, vegetarian bodybuilders should consider phasing out sugar.

Is sugar harmless?

No. Eat two huge pieces of rich chocolate cake, and then journal your mind-body experience and ultimately how you feel one to two hours afterward. Without getting into the “everything in moderation is fine” philosophy, we can simply look at what our body already knows.

Because I don’t eat sugar, I know that if I consumed two sugary drinks in one day, I would feel horrible.

My gut (pun intended) would indicate to me that I shouldn’t be putting it into my system – that it’s bad. But how harmful is sugar, and should we consider phasing it out of our diet entirely?

“I chose to phase processed-sugar out of my diet because my body, not research, tells me it feels healthier. It’s clear (to me) that my energy levels, sleep, mood, and mental clarity benefit from abstaining.”

I’m not sure I would even want to completely phase out all sweets, because it does contribute to my quality of life.

I get my sugar fix from fruits, peanut butter sandwiches, and protein shakes.

However, many of us use sugar as a feel-good crutch.

Don’t worry if you can’t seem to make it through a day without a sugar fix, you’re not alone.

Whether your weakness is sweet coffee beverages, chocolate, ice cream, or cookies, sugar has a way of comforting us and calming our nerves. However, this positive sensation is temporary, and quickly begins to take its toll on your physical and mental health.

Many health-conscious people aren’t reaching their weight and fitness goals because they are addicted to sugar and don’t even know it. 

According to medical researchers who published a study in the February 3, 2014 edition of “JAMA Internal Medicine,” those who consume more than 21% of daily calories from added sugar had double the risk of death from heart disease than those who consumed less than 10% of calories from added sugars.

Is Sugar Toxic?

Yes. Most of the research that I’ve read suggests that consuming sugar in moderate-to-high amounts over time can contribute to various diseases and cancers. However, sugar may not be as bad as some of the hype suggests; here’s a great article by The New York Times that teases this out quite nicely.

Sugary foods may be pleasurable when times get tough, but sugar has no positive nutritional value beyond simple calories.

Nutritionist and author Dr. Nancy Appleton highlights over 100 of sugar’s metabolic consequences in her book, “Lick the Sugar Habit”.

Some include:

  • Immune system suppression
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Significant rise in triglycerides
  • Obesity
  • Tooth decay
  • Arthritis
  • Diabetes

Whether you’re a vegetarian bodybuilder, aspiring athlete, or casual gym-goer, you should also know that sugar also affects your athletic performance. A study published in “Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise” involved a group of highly-trained cyclists who were given sugary drinks after riding to exhaustion.

Although sugar gave the cyclists immediate bursts of energy, it metabolized in the liver, which can cause fatty liver disorder if that extreme level of physical activity is not maintained. This condition reduces the body’s ability to respond to insulin, the hormone that helps control blood sugar.

Pure Sugar vs. Sugar Substitutes

Many people make the mistake of switching out pure sugar for artificial sugar, which is actually also harmful. Artificial sweeteners like Splenda form more acids than pure sugar does, promote weight gain, and can result in increased sugar cravings over time.

Sugar-free soda and candy is not a healthy alternative for foods derived from pure sugar. “A calorie of sugar is a calorie of sugar, so whether you’re getting it from white sugar or some other type of sweetener, you’re still adding empty calories to your diet,” explained Rachel K. Johnson, professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont.

However, as Harvard Medical School editor, Holly Strawbridge, points out, not all artificial sweeteners are created equal. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved five artificial sweeteners:

  • aspartame
  • saccharin
  • acesulfame
  • neotame
  • sucralose

As well as one natural low-calorie sweetener, stevia.

Research shows that these artificial substances interact with the body in complex ways, preventing the body from associating sweets with caloric intake.

Science Behind Sugar Cravings

Research shows that sugar cravings aren’t all in your head. A study recently published in the “British Medical Journal” investigated the links between sugar consumption, body weight, and how addictive sugar really is.

Robert Lustig, professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, well-known for his research into the effects of dietary sugar, explained that table sugar is made of glucose and fructose, which are chemically-bound to each other as a “chronic toxin.”

Sugar overpowers the other taste buds on your tongue, creating a pleasurable sensation in even less desirable foods. The World Health Organization recommends that added sugar intake should be limited to 10% of total energy intake, but the American Heart Association suggests a lower limit of 5%.

Sugar in a Vegetarian Diet

If you struggle with controlling your sugar intake or keeping your blood sugar balanced, consider becoming a vegetarian, or even a part-time vegetarian or a flexitarian which simply means eating mostly vegetarian with occasional meat

According to the Mayo Clinic’s M. Regina Castro, M.D., plant-based diets can not only help you control your weight, but also make your body more responsive to insulin and reduce your risk of diabetes-related complications.

By eating a diet of fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes, you can improve your blood sugar control and promote healthy insulin production. But as Dr. Castro warns, vegetarians should limit their intake of simple carbohydrates and starches, like potatoes and white bread, which can actually have a negative impact on blood sugar.

A study conducted at the University of Cincinnati found that 12-week vegan diets resulted in 12 to 27 percent lower fasting blood sugar levels and promoted weight loss in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Through these findings, the researchers concluded that vegetarian diets are more effective than conventional diets for managing diabetes.

Even if you don’t have diabetes, vegetarian and vegan diets have proven health benefits.

According to nutritionist Debra Wein, plant-based diets may improve your blood sugar by increasing your levels of dietary fiber. Fiber slows the rate your body releases sugar into the bloodstream, ensuring even levels of energy throughout the day. Complex carbohydrates promote glycogen production, helping to control energy demands and blood sugar levels.

Healthy vegetarian diets also provide the body with antioxidants, which protect against the harmful effects of excess blood sugar on bodily cells.

Foods That Counteract Sugar Cravings

Far too often, dieters cut sugar out of their diets cold turkey, which is rarely a realistic or successful goal. Here are a few healthy foods that nutritionists recommend to counteract sugar cravings:

  • Apples – tastes sweet, high in fiber, makes the stomach feel full
  • Sweet corn – tastes sweet, rich in vitamins and minerals, full of antioxidants
  • Sweet potato – tastes sweet, supplies the body with vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin B6, and iron
  • Cinnamon – replaces sugar, prevents blood sugar spikes, normalizes blood sugar levels
  • Tomatoes – high in serotonin to reduce cravings, regulates cholesterol, controls blood sugar

If you’re an athlete or bodybuilder, you should focus on consuming the best types of sugar to enhance your performance. There are a few main types of sugars that you should familiarize yourself with: monosaccharides, disaccharides, lactose, maltose, and polysaccharides.

If you’re looking for a quick boost of energy before a workout, try carbohydrates high in glucose (like potatoes, grains, and fruits), since this type of sugar can immediately be stored in your muscles as glycogen.

How to Start Phasing Sugar Out of Your Diet?

Keep a food journal to identify triggers of when you crave sugar the most.

Learn more about the artificial sweeteners that you’ve been choosing as a “healthy” sugar alternative.

Toss all sugary foods out of the house, and create a sugar-free vegetarian or vegan meal plan.

Read nutritional labels, and choose fresh produce with natural sugars over processed foods with added sugar.

Document your food cravings and what satisfies them as you begin sugar detox.

Cook and eat meals at home whenever possible to take control of your sugar intake.

Avoid behavioral and emotional triggers that tempt you to abandon sugar-free habits.

Sugar Detox Meal Plans

Breakfast 1: Sweet Detox Smoothie

  • Unsweetened almond, rice, or coconut milk
  • Slices of avocado
  • Almond butter
  • Fresh organic berries

Lunch 1: Sautéed Garlic and Vegetable Kelp Noodles

  • Coconut oil
  • Summer squash
  • Mushrooms
  • Garlic cloves
  • Chopped basil
  • Fennel bulb
  • Pine nuts
  • Kelp noodles

Dinner 1: Veggie and Quinoa Salad

  • Generous portions of kale or spinach
  • Quinoa
  • Mix of carrots, broccoli, cucumber, mushrooms, artichoke, and beets
  • Sprinkling of seeds and nuts
  • Tahini ginger dressing

Breakfast 2: Green Power Shake

  • Spinach
  • Blueberries
  • Flax oil
  • Spirulina
  • Maca powder
  • Almond milk
  • Plant-based protein powder

Lunch 2: Sweet and Savory Salad

  • Ripe avocados
  • Ripe peaches
  • Lime juice
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Fresh cilantro
  • Ground coriander seed

Dinner 2: Acorn Squash with Rice Bake

  • Medium acorn squash
  • Wild rice
  • Coconut oil
  • Cinnamon
  • Chili powder
  • Raw or dry roasted pumpkin seeds
  • Chopped parsley
  • Chopped rosemary
  • Pomegranate seeds

Here’s an Anti-Inflammatory Juice Recipe that’s great to add to the mix for sugar detox.

Anti-Inflammatory Juice Recipe

  • 2 green apples
  • 2 cucumbers
  • 4 stalks of celery
  • 2 handfuls of spinach
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 knob of ginger

*add fresh turmeric (and black pepper for absorption) to help alleviate muscle soreness

For more ideas on sugar detox meal plans, watch this video – 5 DAYS NO SUGAR CHALLENGE | HOW I QUIT SUGAR + HEALTHY RECIPE IDEAS!

Summary

Since sugars are added to so many foods that are commonplace in our diets, phasing out sugar is often easier said than done.

By choosing a plant-based diet that incorporates naturally-occurring sugars instead of artificially added ones, you can get one step closer to controlling your cravings, building lean muscle, and living a more holistic bodybuilding lifestyle.

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Sugar Detox Meal Plans

DOES NUTRITION TIMING for BODYBUILDING MATTER?


Nutrition timing for bodybuilding is not nearly as important as the hype suggests. The bottom line is to make sure that your aggregate daily nutritional needs are met by the time your head hits the pillow, regardless of timing and frequency of eating.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

However, nutrition timing for bodybuilding is not nearly as important as the hype suggests.

The bottom line is to make sure that your aggregate daily nutritional needs are met by the time your head hits the pillow, regardless of timing and frequency of eating.

In this article, I will offer practical recommendations for timing nutrition around training sessions and address questions like when to drink protein shakes.

Your actual needs will vary depending on your size, genetics, duration and intensity of your training, and of course… your personal goals.

Consume approximately 15-20% of your targeted daily nutrition 2 hours before and 25-30% after a workout (for a total of 40-50%) is optimal, specifically on days you train hard. And if you’re trying to pack on size, I recommend sipping on vegan protein shake throughout your workout.

The reason why I recommend not as much food intake before, versus after, is because to digest more food would require more energy, in turn can render you with less energy to work with for the training session. In other words, eating a lot before a workout can make you feel tired and sluggish.

You may also want to take BCAAs (branched chain amino acids) before, during, and after a workout if you’re on a calorie restricted diet during a cutting phase (fat-loss period). Otherwise, if you’re eating enough food and protein, I don’t think it’s necessary.

To use myself as an example: I weight 230 lbs so my targeted daily amount of protein is approximately 230 grams to maintain my current size and strength. Therefore, I would consume the higher end of 69 grams of protein (230 x 30%) within the 2-hour window before hitting the weights, and then another 69 grams of protein within the 2-hour window afterwards.

Side Note: If I want to gain 5lbs of muscle and weight 235lbs I would consume 235 grams of protein a day. You always mirror/match your protein intake with the desired body weight.

It’s important to note you don’t have to eat 1 meal with the full 69 grams of protein, you can option to break it up so that 2 hours out you can have a larger meal with 40 grams, and then an hour out have another meal with 29 grams of protein. Personally, I like to split it up for more balanced energy levels and it tend to feel more comfortable on my digestive system, but everyone’s different so just respond to what your body is telling feels best.

Please keep in mind nutrient timing is just one tool we have in our bodybuilding toolbox. And like everything we can apply in life, context is an overriding factor, which is why I specifically indicate a percentage of your targeted daily nutrition because depending on your personal goals you will have different dietary needs.

For instance, a female bikini competitor has different goals and nutritional needs than a male bodybuilder. Or, a vegan endurance runner has different goals and nutritional needs than a pescatarian powerlifter.

Nutrient timing isn’t the magic bullet to create explosive results per se, but it is tried and true fundamental. It will certainly assist you in becoming a more physically effective version of yourself in fitness.

Protein, Carbs, and Fats

Protein

Consuming protein a couple hours before, and after, a workout pumps amino acids into your system at the most optimal time your body needs it. This increases your muscle and strength building capacity in a big way. This is also why we take the BCAAs in parallel with this timing.

Carbs

Consuming protein a couple hours before, and after, a workout provides energy and enhances your training whether it’s high intensity or lower intensity. When consumed with protein, carbohydrates increase protein synthesis and stimulates the release of insulin. And personally, I suggest you avoid any of those sugary carb drinks, they are simply unnecessary. Bananas or apples are a much healthier option.

Fats

Fats don’t fuel training sessions per se, that’s what carbs are for, but they do slow down our digestive system. To be clear, fat doesn’t reduce the benefits of protein and carbohydrate intake within our 2-hour window of training either. It comes down to the individual and how it affects you energetically. In this case, if it feels good…do it!

When to drink protein shakes?

In the past, many fitness experts recommended fast acting proteins like whey… the logic behind this was that the more quickly amino acids get pumped into your muscles, the more effective it was after a workout. More recently, some experts suggest that fast-digesting proteins may get absorbed too fast because they’re in and out of the bloodstream so quickly that protein synthesis doesn’t get a good chance to do it’s thing.

It is my observation that protein powders aren’t necessarily any better, or worse, than whole food protein after training.

So it comes down to convenience and preference. However, I suggest that you try both a few separate times, be mindful of how they make you feel, and journal about the experiences. At the end of a 1-2 week trial period, go with the option that makes you feel the best energetically.

Portions in Practice

This example can be used for both before and after training, but keep in mind this is more of an example for maintenance versus growth. To reiterate, your portions will vary depending on your weight, type of training, and your personal goals. These can be consumed in one meal or broken up into two meals:

For Men:

  • 3 handfuls of protein
  • 3 handfuls of vegetables
  • 2 handfuls of carbs
  • 2 thumbs of fats

For Women:

  • 2 handfuls of protein
  • 2 handful of vegetables
  • 1 handful of carbs
  • 1 thumb of fats

*Sometimes after an intense training session you might not feel like eating. No worries, you can option for a protein shake and some fresh raw veggie juice all the same.

For more ideas related to nutrition timing for bodybuilding, watch this video – The Best Science-Based Diet to Build Lean Muscle (ALL MEALS SHOWN!)

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Nutrition Timing for Bodybuilding