Which Hormone Controls Thyroid Hormones Production?

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The thyroid produces two main thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Production of your thyroid hormones is governed by another thyroid hormone produced in the pituitary gland located deep within the brain. This thyroid hormone is called thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH).

 

While TSH is considered a thyroid hormone it is not actually produced in the thyroid. Once released by the pituitary TSH travels to the thyroid via the bloodstream to stimulate production of the thyroid hormones.

 

When levels of T4 and T3 fall, the pituitary secretes more TSH. Conversely, as T4 and T3 levels rise the pituitary secretes less TSH. Normally this feedback system ensures your body has adequate amounts of both T4 and T3. When TSH is high it is a clear indication your body is suffering from inadequate thyroid activity.

 

A healthy thyroid gland manufactures far greater quantities of T4 than T3. While T4 does have some effects, it is considered the ‘storage’ form. T4 is converted to T3 by the body when a greater thyroid response is needed. This means T4 is on standby, ready to be quickly converted into the active T3 when it is required to boost the metabolic rate.

 

Thyroid disease results from an underactive or overactive thyroid that produces too little or too much of the thyroid hormones. Knowing how your thyroid works helps you understand your thyroid problem. It also helps you understand why it’s vital to get more than TSH tested. The widely held belief that TSH is an accurate marker of thyroid health is misleading.

 

Below Here are 2 videos for you to understand more about thyroid hormones.

 

 

 

Read more about the 5 tests you should discuss with your doctor to get a real diagnosis.

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

Is there Link between Strong Bones and Healthy Parathyroid Glands?

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If you have hypothyroidism and are worried about your bone health, or have been told you have osteoporosis you will definitely want to read this article to find out why healthy parathyroid glands keep your bones strong.

 

The parathyroid glands are endocrine organs. They play an important role in the body’s complex hormone system to keep you fit and well.

 

‘Para’ means near, or next to which explains the name given to these four glands that are attached to the rear of the thyroid. In fact, the tiny parathyroid glands are so closely situated to the thyroid that they share the same blood supply.

 

Although the parathyroid and thyroid glands have similar sounding names each gland produces different hormones, each with their own specific functions.

 

Strong bones need healthy parathyroid glands

 

When it comes to bone health, the most fundamental nutrient is calcium. This mineral plays a critical role to safeguard against osteoporosis, which leads to weak and fragile bones. The bones are a vast reservoir for calcium as it is an essential building block to maintain healthy bone structure.

 

The parathyroid glands keep your bones strong by ensuring your body gets the calcium it needs to maintain bone strength. Optimal calcium balance is also crucial for muscle function and healthy nervous system activity.

 

As you may already know, bone is a dynamic, living tissue. Healthy parathyroid gland activity supports the normal process of bone breakdown and bone building. Steady and balanced bone turnover is a normal process that benefits lifelong bone health.

 

To help regulate levels of calcium the parathyroid glands make ‘parathyroid hormone’. This hormone is often termed a calcium-regulating hormone.

 

When blood calcium levels drop extra parathyroid hormone is released into the bloodstream. This draws calcium from the bones and stimulates greater uptake of calcium by the kidneys. The net effect is an increase of calcium in the blood.

 

When blood calcium levels get too high the parathyroid glands respond swiftly by reducing parathyroid hormone production. This keeps calcium stored in the bone and puts a halt to bone breakdown.

 

Strong bones need a well-functioning thyroid

 

The thyroid plays an important role in building bone health by producing a plentiful supply of calcitonin. This thyroid hormone is also termed a calcium-regulating hormone as it helps block excessive bone breakdown.

 

When blood calcium levels rise, the thyroid releases greater amounts of calcitonin to bring blood calcium levels back down to normal. Parathyroid hormone and calcitonin work in sync to regulate calcium balance. By having two hormones with opposing actions, the body can closely regulate calcium concentrations.

 

The vitamin D – parathyroid connection

 

The link between vitamin D and healthy bones was made many years ago when it was realised that sunlight, or taking cod liver oil boosted vitamin D which in turn helped prevent a soft bone disorder in children called rickets.

 

Today, vitamin D is seen as vital for overall health and strong bones.

 

Calcitriol is a calcium-regulating hormone produced from vitamin D. When blood calcium levels drop, parathyroid hormone triggers the kidneys to make greater amounts of this active form of vitamin D. Calcitriol increases blood calcium levels by increasing absorption of calcium from the digestive system.

 

A drop in vitamin D is associated with higher production of parathyroid hormone. This has the potential to increase bone loss. Maintaining optimal vitamin D can therefore have a protective effect to guard against excessive bone turnover.

 

How do you check parathyroid health?

 

If you are worried about your bone health or have been told you have osteoporosis it is a great idea to check your parathyroid health.

 

A blood test that specifically measures parathyroid hormone levels is the main way to diagnose a problem. Medical practitioners and pathology labs routinely abbreviate the words parathyroid hormone to ‘PTH’. The PTH test is usually done along with a check of blood calcium levels.

 

Problems can occur if the parathyroid glands are either producing too much or too little parathyroid hormone.

 

Hypoparathyroidism is characterised by low levels of parathyroid hormone. On the other hand, when the parathyroid glands are overactive these glands produce an inappropriately high amount of parathyroid hormone.

 

When parathyroid hormone levels are high the rate at which bone is lost exceeds the rate at which new bone is being formed. This leads to bones becoming weak and susceptible to fractures. This is the reason hyperparathyroidism is linked to the development of osteoporosis.

 

The parathyroid glands are tiny and are normally only the size of a grain of rice. This makes visual identification of a problem tricky. Your medical practitioner may request a scan to help diagnose a problem with one or more of the parathyroid glands. A bone density test may also be performed to assess bone health.

 

The 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, or 25OHD blood test is the most accurate way to measure how much active vitamin D is in the body.

 

Are environmental toxins also taking a toll on parathyroid health?

 

Like or not we are exposed to a wide range of environmental toxins in the air we breathe, the food we eat and the water we drink. As mentioned above the thyroid and parathyroid glands share the same blood supply.

 

Further, there is a high volume of blood washing through these glands. This can make these glands susceptible to the damaging effects of environmental toxins or other harmful compounds that may be circulating in the blood supply.

 

Watch these videos below

 

What Are Parathyroid Glands? How Calcium is Controlled.

 

Top 15 Super Foods to Build Strong Bones and Teeth

 

How to Keep Your Bones Healthy?

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

Why Vitamin D is needed for a Healthy Thyroid?

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For decades vitamin D was thought of only in terms of bone health. This nutrient decreases parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels which reduces calcium loss from bone. This is important for maintaining bone density.

 

However ongoing research reveals vitamin D plays a much broader role.

When converted by the body to its active form this nutrient actually has hormone-like functions. The active form of vitamin D is referred to as D3 and it is now recognised as a hormone, not a vitamin.

 

D3 is important for many aspects of health including supporting optimal thyroid hormone activity. D3 deficiencies occur more frequently than previously believed.

 

Reduced sun exposure along with ageing significantly decreases the skin’s capacity to activate D3. A specific blood test of D3, not vitamin D is a good place to assess D3 levels.

 

The body naturally makes vitamin D when the skin is directly exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB) rays from the sun. That’s why this nutrient is often dubbed the ‘sunshine’ vitamin.

 

Absorption of vitamin D occurs rapidly and you don’t need to tan or to burn in order to get adequate amounts. In addition, individuals with paler skin are able to produce vitamin D more easily than those with darker skin.

 

D3 deficiencies occur more frequently than previously believed and a significant number of individuals are at risk due to reduced sun exposure and the widespread use of sunscreens.

 

More than just bone health

 

Emerging research reveals vitamin D plays a much broader role to support health.  The active form of vitamin D is referred to as D3 and it is now officially termed a hormone rather than a vitamin.

 

D3 is important for many aspects of health. Most notably this nutrient controls the way in which cells grow and divide. For this reason research continues into the anti-cancer effects of D3.

 

Some of the functions of the body that D3 supports include:

 

  • Immune system to help fight infection
  • Muscle function by reducing inflammation within the muscles
  • Cardiovascular function for a healthy heart and circulation
  • Respiratory system for healthy lungs and airways
  • Brain development to ward off neurological decline
  • Anti-cancer effects

 

Low D3 now common even in countries with abundant sunshine

 

The most natural way to get vitamin D3 is by exposing your bare skin to sunlight. However there are some limiting factors which can affect the amount of vitamin D your body can produce. This includes:

 

  • The amount of skin you expose. The less skin you expose, the less vitamin D you can produce.

 

  • Your age. As you get older, your skin has a harder time producing vitamin D.

 

  • Wearing sunscreens. Sunscreens block a lot of vitamin D production.
  • The altitude you live at. The sun is more intense at the top of a mountain than at the beach. This means you make more vitamin D when you live at a higher altitude.

 

  • Cloudy weather. Less sunlight reaches your skin on a cloudy day and your skin therefore makes less vitamin D.

 

  • Air pollution. Particles in polluted air reflect sunlight back into space. This means that if you live somewhere where there is lots of air pollution your skin produces less vitamin D.

 

  • Working or living behind glass. Glass windows blocks UVB rays so you can’t make vitamin D even when there is sunlight outside.

 

  • You avoid direct sun exposure. If you have had skin cancer or if you’re worried about exposing your skin to the sun you are more likely to have low D3 levels.

 

D3 and thyroid health

 

A recent study published in Endocrine Practice reveals low D3 may contribute to the severity of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. This thyroid disorder is extremely common, especially in women. It is associated with high levels of autoimmune antibodies that directly target the thyroid gland.

 

Researchers found patients diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis had significantly low levels of active D3 in their blood and the scale of the vitamin D deficiency correlated with the severity of the thyroid disorder.

 

Endocrine Practice is the official journal of the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE).

 

Additional research is required to determine if low thyroid function causes a vitamin D3 deficiency, or low vitamin D3 status may contribute to a thyroid disorder.

 

Getting the right amount of vitamin D3

 

The 25-hydroxycholecalciferol blood test, abbreviated to 25 OHD is the most accurate way to measure how much vitamin D is present in the body.

It’s now accepted vitamin D can do so much more than simply prevent bone disease.

 

However the ground breaking research into the effects of vitamin D has significantly changed the viewpoints on the accepted reference ranges. It brings into question the current reference ranges that start at around 50 nmol/L.

 

The Vitamin D Council is a leading US research organisation committed to educating the public on the importance of vitamin D. They currently suggests that 50 ng/ml of 25 OHD is the ideal level to aim for. The equivalent metric measurement is 125 nmol/L.

 

Whereas the Endocrine Society recommends taking a vitamin D supplement of around 2,000 IU daily to reach and stay above a level of 30ng/ml or 75 nmol/l.

 

Until the experts agree on an acceptable target if you have been told your levels are low after a blood test it’s a good idea to take a vitamin D3 supplement to restore healthy levels. This is a simple, cost effective step to ensure adequate intake.

 

Balanced intake using a specific vitamin D3 supplement is the best strategy to consider as this form is more effective at raising levels 25 OHD in the blood than a D2 supplement.

 

Watch this video – How to make enough vitamin D for your thyroid

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

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Is there any link between Hypothyroidism and Depression?

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The link between hypothyroidism and depression has long been recognised. Back in 1969 researchers reported ‘clinical symptoms may mimic that of melancholic depression and dementia’.

 

Depression is More Than Feeling sad

 

Feeling sad or disappointed at times is a normal reaction to the challenges of everyday life. However when it comes to depression this condition is associated with more than general feelings of sadness.

 

Depression leads to feelings of pessimism and ongoing despair.

 

Individuals with depression suffer in many areas of their lives. It interferes with their ability to cope with everyday life. In addition, they often feel disconnected from their friends and family.

 

The link between your emotional health and hypothyroidism

 

Emotional health problems such as depression, anxiety, and post-natal depression may be due to an underlying thyroid issue.

 

Hypothyroidism occurs when there is low production, or reduced activity of the thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism, especially when coupled with adrenal fatigue, gives rise to a diverse range of emotional health problems. Many individuals with a thyroid-adrenal imbalance also experience depression.

 

The symptoms that help identify depression include:

 

  • Feeling hopeless about life.
  • A lack of interest in daily activities.
  • Anger or irritability.
  • Memory and concentration problems.
  • Appetite or weight changes.
  • Sleep changes.
  • Feeling physically drained.
  • Feelings of not being worthy.
  • Addictions and addictive behaviour.
  • Unexplained muscle aches and headaches

 

Low T3 + mood

 

One explanation for the link between hypothyroidism and depression is the influence of triiodothyronine (T3). T3 is normally concentrated in the area of the brain that controls emotions such as joy, anger and fear.

 

T3 plays an important role in regulating activity of the three ‘feel good’ neurotransmitters. These neurotransmitters have a powerful effect on your emotions. These key neurotransmitters include serotonin, noradrenaline and GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid).

 

Serotonin and noradrenaline are often referred to as the ‘happy’ messengers. They boost your mood. Serotonin also helps regulate sleep and hunger.

 

Chronic stress can lower both serotonin and noradrenaline production. GABA is often referred to as the ‘calming’ messenger. It helps keep you relaxed and focused.

 

T3 regulates the action of serotonin, adrenaline and GABA. If you do not have enough T3, or the action is blocked, production of these neurotransmitters can be affected.

 

Could it be hypothyroidism?

 

Individuals with depression, anxiety, or some type of serious psychiatric illness should be screened for hypothyroidism.

 

According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, “The diagnosis of subclinical, or clinical hypothyroidism must be considered in every patient with depression’.

 

It’s possible an individual could experience a significant shift in their mood, and cognitive function if an underlying thyroid disorder is addressed.

 

SPECIAL NOTE: This ‘Hypothyroidism and Depression’ article is for educational purposes to assist you in living well. It should not be used as a substitute for the advice provided by your medical practitioner.

 

If you suspect you are experiencing depression, promptly seek professional advice. Do not cease taking your prescribed medication without the consent of your medical doctor.

 

Watch the following videos

 

Hypothyroidism And Depression Connection

 

How to Fight Depression and Anxiety Caused By Hypothyroidism

Read the following related articles:

 

10 Hypothyroidism Diet Tips to Help Heal Your Thyroid

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

Skin Deep. Do Cosmetics Harm the Thyroid?

 

What is the Best Way to Diagnose Hypothyroidism?

 

Can Basal Temperature Testing Help Diagnosis A Thyroid Problem?

 

Should You Get a T3 Test If You Find It Hard to Lose Weight?

 

Why Knowing How to Calculate Your Reverse T3 Ratio Helps to Assess Overall Thyroid Health?

 

How to Lose Weight with an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Top 6 Detox Tips to Safeguard Thyroid Health

 

6 Possible Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid

 

Why Soy Foods Should Be Avoided if You Have Thyroid Disorder?

 

Why Cruciferous Vegetables Should Be Strictly avoided if you have Thyroid Problems?

 

Why Trans Fats are Harmful for Your Thyroid?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

Why Trans Fats are Harmful for Your Thyroid?

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Trans fats are considered the most harmful type of dietary fat for you and your family. Small amounts of trans fats are naturally found in meat and dairy products. However the main dietary source is processed foods.

 

Trans fats can be synthetically produced and are routinely used in a wide variety of foods found in your local supermarket.

 

They are highly favoured by food manufacturers as they add texture to a food product and extend shelf life.

 

Trans fats are found in processed foods such as deep fried foods, margarine, commercial baked goods (doughnuts, biscuits, cakes, chips and crackers) and microwave popcorn.

 

Trans fats can be listed on a food label with vague names such as ‘hydrogenated oils’ or ‘partially hydrogenated vegetable oils’.

 

What are trans fats?

 

Trans fats are formed by turning liquid vegetable oils into solid fats. This industrial process is termed ‘hydrogenation’. Ongoing scientific evidence confirms a diet high in trans fats will increase a persons’ risk of developing heart disease and diabetes.

 

Increasing consumer awareness is driving the demand to ban the use of this deadly food ingredient. Prohibiting its use would definitely be a step in the right direction.

 

The USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently acknowledged that reducing trans fat intake could prevent thousands of heart attacks and deaths.

 

Truth in labelling trans fats

 

Trans fats are produced on an industrial scale to fuel demand by large food manufactures. They are found in an extensive range of popular food products.

 

Due to lax labelling laws food manufacturers do not always declare that a food product contains trans fats. This means you could be unknowingly consuming these dangerous fats as part of your daily diet. Until food companies provide more truth in labelling this risky food ingredient can easily find its way into your shopping trolley.

 

You are what you eat {literally!} Trans fats and your thyroid

 

Our bodies are constantly regenerated from the food we consume. This means we are what we eat, literally. Any type of dietary fat, good or bad has the potential to be used by the body. Your body needs dietary fat to store energy, to provide structure to cell membranes, and to make important vitamins and hormones.

 

The body does not require trans fats. In fact these fats are very harmful to the body at a basic cell level. Each cell of your body is surrounded by a fatty membrane. When a cell is healthy the outer membrane is flexible. This allows nutrients to pass in and unwanted substances to pass out.

 

When a cell membrane is constructed using hardened and unhealthy fats it becomes rigid. The function of the entire cell is then compromised. This can easily occur in the specialized thyroid cells.

 

Trans fats are very damaging to the thyroid cell membranes. When the cells are compromised it can undermine healthy day-to-day thyroid function.

 

A natural thyroid diet that emphasizes plenty of fresh unprocessed foods is an important step to eliminate trans fats intake. Good quality butter, coconut oil, macadamia nut oil and extra virgin oil are all sources of beneficial dietary fat that will not harm your thyroid.

 

Watch the following videos

 

What Are Trans Fats & Why Are They Bad?

 

Trans-fats in foods you might not expect – BBC News

 

7 Trans Fat Traps You Must Avoid

 

Thyroid Gland Problems : Top 5 Foods To Avoid

 

7 foods that cure hypothyroidism naturally

Read the following related articles:

 

10 Hypothyroidism Diet Tips to Help Heal Your Thyroid

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

Skin Deep. Do Cosmetics Harm the Thyroid?

 

What is the Best Way to Diagnose Hypothyroidism?

 

Can Basal Temperature Testing Help Diagnosis A Thyroid Problem?

 

Should You Get a T3 Test If You Find It Hard to Lose Weight?

 

Why Knowing How to Calculate Your Reverse T3 Ratio Helps to Assess Overall Thyroid Health?

 

How to Lose Weight with an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Top 6 Detox Tips to Safeguard Thyroid Health

 

6 Possible Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid

 

Why Soy Foods Should Be Avoided if You Have Thyroid Disorder?

 

Why Cruciferous Vegetables Should Be Strictly avoided if you have Thyroid Problems?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

How effective is thyroxine for hypothyroidism?

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Thyroxine is the most widely prescribed medication to treat hypothyroidism. It is a synthetic form of thyroxine (T4), one of your key thyroid hormones.

 

How effective is thyroxine for hypothyroidism?

 

Many individuals fail to experience improvements in their hypothyroid symptoms by taking thyroxine.

 

They continue to suffer with the frustrating symptoms of a low thyroid.

Looking at the role of the different thyroid hormones it becomes clearer why a single prescription of thyroxine may be inadequate.

 

The thyroid normally manufactures and releases two main hormones: thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).

 

While T4 does have some effects, it is considered the ‘storage’ thyroid hormone. T4 is converted to T3 by the cells of the body when a greater thyroid response is required.

 

T3 is more potent than T4 and has far greater effects on your overall health and vitality.

 

This means T4 needs to be converted through to T3 to be the most effective.

 

The same scenario applies when you are taking a prescribed T4-only medication. The effects are more noticeable when the T4 is efficiently metabolized to T3.

 

Low T3 leads to a range of low thyroid symptoms.

 

If your T3 has been low you will notice significant improvements in your hypothyroid symptoms when your body is able to convert a larger portion of T4 to T3. T3 helps stimulate your body’s ability to burn calories for energy which has far reaching effects in the body.

 

T3 helps spark energy production, weight loss and can help fire up brain activity to improve memory and concentration. This scenario also applies to prescribed thyroxine; the effectiveness of this drug is more noticeable when the body is able to convert the T4 to T3.

 

It is widely assumed the body will efficiently convert a T4 based thyroid medication without any problems. This assumption seems to go unquestioned by many medical practitioners. However this fails to occur for many individuals. You do not get the full benefit of your T4 medication when it is not being converted to the active T3 form.

 

Do you have a T4 to T3 conversion problem?

 

The process of converting T4 to active T3 is dependent on optimal amounts of zinc and selenium. When there is a deficiency of either of these two minerals you will experience far less activation of your T3.

 

Lowered conversion of T4 to T3 also occurs in response to dieting, stress, toxicity and chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

Many thyroid health experts advocate the use of a T4/T3 combination medication, or even a T3-only medication. Using a combination of T4/T3 or single T3 can compensate for the body’s reduced ability to effectively convert T4 to T3.

 

The most commonly prescribed T4/T3 medication is called Armour Thyroid. This alternative thyroid medication contains a precise mix of T4 and T3.

 

A Naturopathic viewpoint

 

From a Naturopathic viewpoint there is a broad range of factors that influence thyroid health. To see real improvements in thyroid health it is important to identify and address the underlying root causes.

 

Stress, an unhealthy diet, specific nutrient deficiencies, long term illness, chronic infections, food sensitivities and environmental toxins really take a toll on thyroid health.

 

A nutritional product that provides a comprehensive range of nutrients to assist healthy thyroid hormone activity is recommended. A good quality product features at the very least iodine, zinc and selenium.

 

Note: Leveothyroxine medication is typically advocated for life and requires ongoing monitoring. Do not discontinue or change your medication without the informed consent of your prescribing medical practitioner.

 

Watch the following videos

 

Thyroxine: Mechanism of Action of Thyroid Hormones

 

How to decide thyroxine dosage in elderly with fluctuating thyroid levels? – Dr. Sriram Nathan

Why Taking Thyroxine Rarely Makes You Better

 

Hypothyroidism treated with different medicine to thyroxine with Dr Chris Steele on This Morning

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

Levothyroxine – Thyroxin Medication for Hypothyroidism

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Levothyroxine is a synthetic form of the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4). It is the drug of choice to treat hypothyroidism. It is also the standard medical treatment for goitre, or an enlarged thyroid.

 

Levothyroxine hormone replacement therapy is only available with a doctor’s prescription. Brand names include; Eutroxsig®, Oroxine®, Synthroid® and Levothroid®. This thyroid medication can range in strength from 50 to 200 micrograms.

 

Levothyroxine dosage + side effects

 

Levothyroxine is normally first prescribed using a dose at the lower end of the dosing range. Thyroid function tests are routinely performed to check that the dose is adequate to meet individual requirements.

 

Dose adjustments are done gradually until the level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) drops down to the lower end of the standard reference range.

 

Changes to the dose are minor to reduce the risk of side effects. Too much levothyroxine is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, a fast and irregular heartbeat. This is a side effect you would expect if your thyroid became overactive.

 

When first starting levothyroxine medication it can take three to four weeks to take effect. Once stopped, the medication will continue to have effects for one to three weeks.

 

The half-life of a prescribed medication is discussed in relation to how long the medication will take to clear from the body. In technical terms it refers to the time it takes for just one half of a given dose to be eliminated from the body.

 

The half-life of levothyroxine is six to seven days. This means it takes at least six to seven days to clear around one half of this thyroid drug from your system.

 

Given that levothyroxine stays in the body for a considerable length of time doctors are advised to make small adjustments to the dose at three to four week intervals.

 

For pregnant women or women considering having a baby their levothyroxine dose is closely monitored. The dose is often increased during pregnancy as healthy thyroid hormone activity is particularly crucial at this time. A maternal thyroid deficiency during pregnancy can impair healthy development of the baby’s brain and nervous system.

 

How effective is levothyroxine?

 

For many individuals they fail to experience improvements in their thyroid symptoms after taking leveothyroxine for months, or even years. They continue to suffer with the frustrating symptoms of a low thyroid. Looking at the role of the different thyroid hormones it becomes clearer why a single prescription of levothyroxine may be inadequate.

 

The thyroid normally manufactures and releases two key hormones: thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). While T4 does have some effects, it is considered the ‘storage’ thyroid hormone. T4 is converted to T3 by the body when a greater thyroid response is required. This means T4 needs to be converted through to T3 to be the most effective.

 

When conversion of T4 to the more potent T3 takes place it is usual to notice significant improvements in symptoms. T3 helps stimulate metabolism which has far reaching effects in the body. This includes sparking energy production, weight loss and firing up brain activity to improve memory and concentration.

 

This scenario also applies to prescribed levothyroxine; the effects are much more noticeable when the body is able to convert the supplemental T4 to T3.

 

It is widely assumed the body will convert levothyroxine, the synthetic form of T4, to the biologically active T3 when it needs more of this hormone. This seems to go unquestioned as a medical fact. However for many individuals this fails to occur.

 

Do you have a T4 to T3 conversion problem?

 

There are two nutrients necessary to support ongoing conversion of T4 to T3. They are zinc and selenium. Reduced conversion of T4 to T3 occurs when there is a deficiency of either of these two minerals.

 

Lowered conversion of T4 to T3 also occurs in response to dieting, stress, toxicity and chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

Many thyroid health experts advocate the use of T4/T3 medications. Using a combination of the two key hormones can compensate for the body’s reduced ability to effectively convert T4 to T3. An example of this is Armour Thyroid medication. This alternative thyroid medication contains both T4 and T3.

 

A Naturopathic viewpoint

 

From a Naturopathic viewpoint there is a broad range of factors that influence thyroid health. To see real improvements in thyroid health it is important to identify and address the underlying root causes. Stress, an unhealthy diet, specific nutrient deficiencies, chronic illness, food sensitivities and environmental toxins really take a toll on thyroid health.

 

A nutritional product that provides a comprehensive range of nutrients to assist healthy thyroid hormone activity is recommended. A good quality product features at the very least iodine, zinc and selenium.

 

Note: Leveothyroxine medication is typically advocated for life and requires ongoing monitoring. Do not discontinue or change your medication without the informed consent of your prescribing medical practitioner.

 

Watch these videos

 

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Levothyroxine Side Effects – Complete List + Dosing Guide for Patients

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

What is Goitre & What Causes Goitre Which is a Common Thyroid Problem

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A goitre refers to an abnormal enlargement of your thyroid. When you look in the mirror you may notice a lump around your throat, or a visible band of swelling around the base of your neck.

 

Women over 40 are at far greater risk of developing a goitre.
The common signs of a goitre

 

A goitre may not cause any physical discomfort, or it may cause difficulty with swallowing along with a range of other symptoms depending on the extent of the swelling. The signs of a goitre may include:

 

  • noticeable lump in the throat region
  • sensation of a lump in the throat
  • difficulty drinking and swallowing food
  • hoarseness of the voice or difficultly speaking
  • breathing problems due to swelling
  • dizziness when arms are raised above the head
  • visible veins in the neck

 

Secondary hypothyroid symptoms are common as a goitre will reduce healthy thyroid function.

 

What causes a goitre?

 

+ Worldwide a goitre is one of the earliest and most visible signs of an iodine deficiency.

 

+ If you are not low in iodine then the formation of a goitre could be due to a thyroid autoimmune disorder such as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

 

+ A goitre can also be due to nodules growing on the thyroid and in some circumstances a goitre can develop due to thyroid cancer.

 

Get an accurate diagnosis

 

Any type of abnormal swelling in the neck or throat should be checked by your doctor. Your doctor will do a physical examination and order blood tests to check your thyroid hormone levels. They may also recommend an iodine clearance test.  Due to the limitations of a physical examination most doctors refer patients to an imaging clinic for a thyroid ultrasound.

 

How is a goitre treated?

 

Treatment depends on the extent of the swelling, your symptoms and the underlying cause. Uncovering the cause is very important so you can commence with the most appropriate treatment.

 

The standard medical approach includes:

 

+ ‘Watchful waiting’. If the goitre is small and not bothering you it’s likely your doctor will not recommend any type of treatment and instead opt to for regular monitoring. However it is a very good idea to get proactive and find effective ways to deal with the underlying cause.

 

+ Thyroid medication. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy is commonly prescribed to treat the associated hypothyroid symptoms.

Thyroxine is the most widely prescribed medication to treat low thyroid function. It is a synthetic form of thyroxine (T4).

 

+ Iodine supplementation. Iodine is prescribed if the goitre is due to an iodine deficiency. Low iodine intake causes enlargement of the thyroid. A good quality iodine supplement is an effective strategy to reduce thyroid swelling.

 

+ Biopsy. A biopsy sample of your thyroid tissue may be required if there are large nodules within the thyroid. A biopsy is taken to also rule out thyroid cancer.

 

+ Surgery. Removal of the thyroid may be recommended if the goitre is large and causing difficulty with breathing and swallowing. If all of the thyroid is removed you will need to take thyroid hormone replacement therapy for the rest of your life.

 

Here are some recommendations you can get started with today…

 

+ Avoid dietary goitrogens. Some foods contain substances that interfere with uptake of iodine by the thyroid and are therefore known as goitrogens. The term is derived from the word ‘goitre’. Soy, millet and cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, Brussels sprouts, turnips, bok choy, kale, cauliflower and broccoli are the most common. In their raw state these vegetables are very goitrogenic.

 

+ Eat a wholesome, thyroid nourishing diet. Fresh, natural foods supply a wide range of nutrients to help you recover your thyroid health.

 

+ Avoid thyroid disrupting toxins. Ongoing research reveals toxic environmental chemicals pose a serious threat to your thyroid health.

 

+ Filter your water. Most urban water supplies have fluoride-like compounds added in. Fluoride blocks thyroid function and is best illustrated by the fact that it is used as a thyroid suppressing medication for hyperthyroid conditions.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – Natural Treatment for Goitre

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10 Hypothyroidism Diet Tips to Help Heal Your Thyroid

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

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5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

Skin Deep. Do Cosmetics Harm the Thyroid?

 

What is the Best Way to Diagnose Hypothyroidism?

 

Can Basal Temperature Testing Help Diagnosis A Thyroid Problem?

 

Should You Get a T3 Test If You Find It Hard to Lose Weight?

 

Why Knowing How to Calculate Your Reverse T3 Ratio Helps to Assess Overall Thyroid Health?

 

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Top 6 Detox Tips to Safeguard Thyroid Health

 

6 Possible Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid

 

Why Soy Foods Should Be Avoided if You Have Thyroid Disorder?

 

Why Cruciferous Vegetables Should Be Strictly avoided if you have Thyroid Problems?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

Why Cruciferous Vegetables Should Be Strictly avoided if you have Thyroid Problems?

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Cruciferous vegetables such as kale, broccoli and Brussels sprouts are full of nutrients that help keep you healthy.

 

However if you have thyroid problems and are taking vital steps to recover your thyroid health you may want to strictly avoid these vegetables, especially in their raw state.

 

What’s the go with cruciferous vegetables?

 

Cruciferous vegetables are also known as Brassica vegetables. These green vegetables are members of the Cruciferae, or mustard family. Their name is based on the shape of their flowers which have four equal sized petals that form the shape of a crucifix.

 

The most commonly consumed cruciferous vegetables include; kale, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, bok choy, broccolini, Chinese cabbage, kohlrabi, radish, mustard greens, collard greens, choy sum, horseradish, turnips, rocket and wasabi.

 

The health protective effects of cruciferous vegetables

 

One of the unique things about cruciferous vegetables is that they are rich sources of glucosinolates. These sulphur containing compounds give these vegetables their pungent aroma and spicy taste.

 

Glucosinolates break down into several biologically active compounds that are being studied for their promising anti-cancer effects. For most people consuming cruciferous vegetables may help lower their risk of developing cancer.

 

However for people with thyroid problems or a low thyroid these vegetables should be strictly avoided, particularly in their raw state or in excessive amounts.

 

Cruciferous vegetables block healthy thyroid activity

 

The word ‘goitrogen’ is derived from the word ‘goitre’, a condition in which the thyroid gland becomes enlarged. The term is also used to describe a food that interferes with proper thyroid function. The most common goitrogenic foods are vegetables from the cruciferous family, and soy foods.

 

Goitrogenic foods may not necessarily cause a goitre, but they do have the potential to block proper thyroid activity by inhibiting the action of iodine and causes thyroid problems. This goitrogenic effect is far more noticeable when a person has an iodine deficiency.

 

The kale craze and green smoothies

 

Kale has become a very popular ingredient in freshly prepared green smoothies. This means some health conscious individuals could be consuming kale on most days. The fact is, consuming too much of this cruciferous vegetable can shut down the thyroid and causes thyroid problems.

 

Whenever you over consume one vegetable you are also taking in a greater quantity of the anti-nutritional factors of that particular plant. Plants have different chemicals to deter animals, including plant eating humans, from over grazing on them.

 

Can you return to eating cruciferous vegetables?

 

When your thyroid health is restored it is possible to re-introduce small amounts of a variety of cooked, or lightly steamed cruciferous vegetables to your daily diet. This should be done along with providing your thyroid with the nutrients it requires to function properly.

 

One of the most important nutrients to support ongoing thyroid health is iodine. Zinc, selenium, tyrosine and B group vitamins are also very important.

 

Watch this Video Below HereHow Kale & Other Vegetables Can Cause Thyroid Problems

 

Read the following related articles:

 

10 Hypothyroidism Diet Tips to Help Heal Your Thyroid

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

Skin Deep. Do Cosmetics Harm the Thyroid?

 

What is the Best Way to Diagnose Hypothyroidism?

 

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Should You Get a T3 Test If You Find It Hard to Lose Weight?

 

Why Knowing How to Calculate Your Reverse T3 Ratio Helps to Assess Overall Thyroid Health?

 

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6 Possible Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid

 

Why Soy Foods Should Be Avoided if You Have Thyroid Disorder?

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

Why Soy Foods Should Be Avoided if You Have Thyroid Disorder?

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Western societies are now consuming an increasing amount of soy that is unfermented and highly processed.

 

The reason?

 

Food manufacturers favour soy as a cheap and versatile ingredient. It’s added to a wide range of human food products and is also routinely used in the animal feed industry.

 

You really need to become a vigilant label checker to discover if a food contains some type of soy ingredient. Soy is now found in bread, breakfast cereals, biscuits, crackers, margarine, chocolate, sauces and soups.

 

Soy is also used to make soy milk, baby formula, soy protein shakes, soy cheese, soy ice cream, vegetable stock, texturised vegetarian soy protein, soy flour, soy protein bars, soy lecithin and soybean oil.

 

Soy protein products and infant formulas often contain soy protein isolate. This is not something that you can make in your kitchen. This soy ingredient is made in high tech chemical processing plants.

 

The extraction process utilises high temperatures and the soybeans are bathed in hexane, a toxic chemical solvent despite the usage of hexane is being prohibited when processing organic soy foods.

 

The safety of soy based infant formula is hotly debated as these products naturally contain a class of plant compounds called isoflavones. The primary isoflavones are genistein and daidzein. These isoflavones are referred to as phytoestrogens because they are found in plants (phyto) and they have the ability to mimic estrogens in the body.

 

It is well recognised infants are sensitive to estrogen exposure as they progress though different developmental stages. This makes infants more likely than adults to be vulnerable to the estrogen-like effects of the phytoestrogens found in soy. There is also research to show that genistein and similar isoflavones can compete for iodine when iodine stores are low.

 

Further, infants fed soy containing formula in early life have a higher risk of developing autoimmune thyroid disease. For infants fed soy formula their rate of exposure to phyotestrogens is much higher which may a negative impact on both their thyroid health and hormonal balance.

 

Soy + Asian cultures

 

In Asia, small quantities of whole bean soy products are considered a traditional staple of the diet. From the simple soybean comes a variety of foods including tofu, natto, miso, tempeh, and boiled soy beans (edamame). These foods are prepared using traditional methods to make these otherwise inedible foods nutritious.

 

Soybeans like other beans, nuts, and seeds contain naturally occurring enzyme inhibitors. Termed phytic acid or phytates, these compounds make soy difficult to digest and also have the potential to bind to minerals in the digestive system.

 

In this way phytic acid acts as an ‘anti-nutrient’ to prevent the absorption of important minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc.

 

Soybeans contain a much higher phytic acid content than most other grains and legumes. If you have been over doing soy products you may be low in these minerals.

 

Thyroid Disorder: Does soy harm the thyroid?

 

An incredible amount of hype has accompanied the meteoric rise of soy as a popular ‘health’ alternative. Once reserved as a staple for vegetarians’ soy is finding its way into the shopping baskets of more conventional consumers in various forms, usually disguised as a refined soy ingredient.

 

When it comes to thyroid health and if you have thyroid disorder, processed soy foods and foods containing soy ingredients should be strictly avoided.

 

Soy is goitrogenic, a term used to describe many foods and environmental compounds that have a serious potential to block normal thyroid activity and causes thyroid disorder.

 

Highly processed soy products are not normally manufactured using the phytic acid reducing techniques used in traditional cultures such as soaking or long slow cooking.

 

This makes these foods harder to breakdown in the digestive system. Overt time this can lead to digestive distress and lowered micronutrient intake.

 

This is not good news for thyroid health as the thyroid is particularly sensitive to nutrient deficiencies. For example; iodine, zinc and selenium are three minerals critical to aid ongoing thyroid hormone activity and prevent thyroid disorder.

 

Globally soybean oil has become the most widely used dietary oil. This soy derived oil is routinely used in margarine and shortening. It is also used in salad dressings, mayonnaise, frozen foods, commercially baked goods and simulated dairy and meat products. Soy oil along with palm oil and canola oil is often deceptively referred to as ‘vegetable oil’ on food labels.

 

Food manufacturers label dietary oils as ‘vegetable oils’ to make them sound healthy. However this is far from the truth. They are neither nutritious nor healthy.

 

The long term consumption of these oils has the potential to harm the thyroid and causes thyroid disorder. As more of these oils are incorporated into the thyroid cells their goitrogenic effects becomes more obvious.

 

The environmental impact of soy

 

The biggest shift in farming methods occurred over the last century, particularly with the introduction of ‘monocultures’. These are large scale farming areas dedicated to a single crop. Soy crops are monocultures favoured by multinational agribusiness to supply a growing demand.

 

As traditional farming methods are lost and the modern monoculture system of production emerges there is an increasing susceptibility of crops to insects and disease. This then pushes up the use of toxic agricultural chemicals.

 

Large soy plantations are viewed by environmentalists as a growing menace. Intense soybean cultivation threatens fragile ecosystems and is taking a significant toll on deforestation of the globe.

 

Soy + genetic engineering

 

Genetic engineering is the process of using biotechnology to transfer specific traits or genes from one organism into a different plant species. The result is a genetically modified (GM) food. The safety and potential long term health risks of these ‘frankenfoods’ is regularly questioned.

 

Soy, canola and corn are the most prevalent GM ingredients and are used in many food products. The first genetically engineered soybeans were planted in the USA in 1996. Now more than 90% of the USA soy crop is GM.

 

As the GM industry grows there has been a corresponding demand for food labels to clearly state if GM plants or microorganisms have been used in production.

 

In the European Union all food, and any ingredients directly produced from a GM source must be labelled even when the GM ingredients may be undetectable in the final product.

 

The ‘Roundup Ready’ soybean controversy

 

The GM soybean known as the Roundup Ready (RR) soybean was developed by the biotech giant Monsanto based in the USA. This crop variety was developed to make it resistant to the Roundup herbicides products which are toxic to conventional soybean plants. Apart from the issue with genetic engineering this GM soy is contaminated with pesticide residues which can easily find their way into the food supply.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – Soy Myths Exposed: The Dangers of Soy

 

Read the following related articles:

 

10 Hypothyroidism Diet Tips to Help Heal Your Thyroid

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

Skin Deep. Do Cosmetics Harm the Thyroid?

 

What is the Best Way to Diagnose Hypothyroidism?

 

Can Basal Temperature Testing Help Diagnosis A Thyroid Problem?

 

Should You Get a T3 Test If You Find It Hard to Lose Weight?

 

Why Knowing How to Calculate Your Reverse T3 Ratio Helps to Assess Overall Thyroid Health?

 

How to Lose Weight with an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Top 6 Detox Tips to Safeguard Thyroid Health

 

6 Possible Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com