Paleo Friendly Savory Herbs Low Carb Zucchini Salmon Pockets


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Impress your guests with these easy, elegant herb-filled salmon pockets served in a grilled zucchini weave.

In this festive appetizer, grilled zucchini slices are interwoven to form delicious bundles of spicy salmon, red bell pepper, parsley, chives and spices. Salmon is a great, versatile fish to work with in the kitchen. Plus, this heart-healthy protein is filled with omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins and minerals!

These zucchini salmon pockets may look like something you’d order at a fancy restaurant, but they are surprisingly easy to throw together. Simply use a vegetable peeler to peel zucchini into ⅛-inch slices lengthwise, flipping it when you reach the seeds in the middle, and repeat on the other side.

Don’t use the first couple of slices from either side, as they’ll be mostly skin and tough to bend (save the middles and skin as a snack for later).

Brush the slices with olive oil and add to a hot grill for just few seconds to give them those beautiful grill marks and a nice smoky taste.

Next, process the ingredients for the salmon filling until a paste forms.

Arrange two zucchini slices vertically and two horizontally, interlacing them in a simple weave.

Place a tablespoon of the salmon mixture in the middle, then wrap the zucchini into a bundle and bake for 15 minutes.

You can serve them hot or cold – it’ll be delicious either way!

Tips:

Fresh cod or tuna fillets can be used in place of the salmon.

For extra protein and flavor, place a small piece of smoked salmon in the zucchini weave before adding the salmon mixture.

These wraps are best served fresh.

Low Carb Zucchini Salmon Pockets

Recipe by Dina Hassan

Impress your guests with these easy, elegant zucchini bundles filled with savory herbs and salmon

Tools:

  • Grill
  • Baking sheet
  • Vegetable peeler
  • Blender or food processor

Ingredients:

  • 2 zucchini
  • 1 T olive oil
  • ½ lb salmon fillets
  • ½ red bell pepper
  • ½ t chili flakes
  • 1 t garlic powder
  • ½ t salt
  • ½ t black pepper
  • Handful of fresh parsley leaves
  • Handful of fresh chives

Instructions:

  1. Preheat a grill, then preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a baking sheet with extra virgin olive oil.
  • Using a vegetable peeler, peel the zucchini into thick slices lengthwise. Start on one side, stop before you get to the seeds in the middle, then flip and repeat on the other side.
  • Brush the zucchini strips with olive oil, then grill for few seconds until they are tender and slightly browned with grill marks. Remove from grill and set aside.
  • Place the salmon, parsley, chives, red bell pepper, chili flakes, garlic powder, salt and pepper in the blender; blend until a paste forms.
  • Place two zucchini strips vertically and two horizontally, interlacing them. Place a tablespoon of the salmon mixture in the middle, then close the zucchini strips over the mix to make a bundle.
  • Line the zucchini wraps on the prepared baking sheet; bake for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly before serving.

Watch this video – Fabio’s Kitchen: Season 2 Episode 13, “Salmon & Zucchini Pasta”

Written by Dina Hassan

Author Bio:

Dina Hassan is a recipe developer, food photographer and food stylist. She believes that the key to a happy life is eating natural food, and when she’s not behind the camera, you can find her cooking up a new healthy recipe.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

The Ultimate Guide to Vitamin D for Your Health


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Over 41% of people in the United States are vitamin D deficient. So clearly, it’s not fatal in most cases, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a big deal.

Vitamin D, the “sunshine vitamin”, is crucial for good mental health, bone health, immune function, and more.

In this guide, I’m going to break down:

  • How vitamin D affects your health
  • How much you need
  • How you should get it

What Does Vitamin D Do?

Before we get to the less than thrilling science of vitamin D formation and metabolism, I think it’s important to highlight why it’s so important for your health.

Here are 4 of the most important and most studied benefits of having a sufficient amount of vitamin D. There are other potential benefits like a lower risk of diabetes, among others, that will be studied more extensively in the future.

1. Bone Health

Strong bones depend on many things, including vitamin D.

You probably already know that calcium is crucial for developing and maintaining dense, strong bones.

What you probably didn’t know, was that vitamin D is needed to stimulate movement of molecules like calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D is needed to absorb both calcium and phosphorus efficiently.

A severe lack of vitamin D can cause rickets, a bone disease in children that results in frail, painful bones throughout the body. There’s also a similar adult equivalent, osteomalacia.

2. Healthy Immune System Function

You immune system is responsible for fighting all sorts of unwanted guests in your body and protecting you from illnesses ranging from the common cold to cancer.

School children were split into 2 groups during one study. One group was given vitamin D supplements, while the other wasn’t. The group with the supplements had about a 42% lower chance of getting the flu.

Similar studies have also shown that vitamin D helps lower the rate at which children develop respiratory infections.

Furthermore, it’s clear that vitamin D plays a fairly major role in the overall immune system, and it will continue to be studied in this aspect.

3. Cancer Protection

Vitamin D can significantly reduce your risk of developing many types of cancer, including breast, colon, ovarian, prostate, pancreatic, and more.

While the mechanism is still not fully known, current theories are that it interrupts one of the key 7 phases of cancer development.

Based on their results, they found that raising the minimum recommended level of vitamin D by 50% would prevent about 58,000 cases of breast cancer and 49,000 cases of colorectal cancer per year.

But what about vitamin D and skin cancer? Don’t worry, we’ll get to that soon.

4. Overall Decreased Risk of Death

There are many theories about how vitamin D helps you stay healthy.

It’s often hard to isolate effects due to interactions and dependencies on other vitamins, especially for fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin D.

However, we can still look at overall trends to see if vitamin D plays a significant role in decreasing mortality, and it appears that it does.

Time and time again, large meta-analysis studies have shown that a healthy vitamin D intake is associated with a longer lifespan. It is a remarkably consistent finding.


The Risks of Vitamin D Deficiency

Those benefits we just looked at are just one side of the coin.

The other half consists of the serious consequences of being chronically deficient in vitamin D. You’re not just risking the flu if you’re not getting enough sun, it could turn out much worse.

1. Rickets

Rickets is a disease that occurs exclusively in children.

If a child doesn’t have enough vitamin D, they can’t absorb calcium effectively from food, as we talked about, which leads to bone issues.

The consequences of rickets include:

  • delayed or stunted growth
  • bone pain
  • muscle weakness
  • skeletal deformation (bowed knees, thickened wrists/ankles, etc.)

2. Osteomalacia

Once you’re an adult, a lack of vitamin D will still cause calcium absorption problems, but you’re obviously fully grown already.

With osteomalacia, your bones get softer.

The symptoms are often not apparent right away, but over time, bone pain and muscle weakness is common. This pain can occur in pretty much any bone, but is most commonly in the hip region, ribs, or legs.

Due to the range in pain felt, it may be difficult to diagnose.

3. Depression

We naturally associate the sun with cheeriness, so it kind of works out well that we believe a vitamin D deficiency can cause depression.

A meta-analysis of studies in 2014 showed that for most people with depression, vitamin D supplementation had no significant effect. However, for those with clinical depression, it did have a statistically significant benefit.

(Related: 5 Ways A Paleo Diet Can Help Depression)

This is still far from conclusive either way. Different doses and situations should be studied in order to more fully understand the link between vitamin D and depression.

Bottom line: while it’s possible that depression can be caused by vitamin D deficiency, it can also be caused by many other things. Don’t automatically assume a vitamin D deficiency when you’re feeling down.


How You Get Vitamin D

So this vitamin D stuff, kind of important, right?

So how do you get it?

Well, there are 3 main sources from which you can get vitamin D.

Before we get to those, there’s one more thing you need to know. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, which means we can store it in our bodies for months, and even years in certain situations. When we talk about daily values, think of this more as an average over the long-term. You don’t necessarily need it every day.

  1. Food

Many people are under the impression that there’s no vitamin D in food – not quite.

Food is not a great source, but you can get a significant amount from it.

See this table from the NIH of vitamin D amounts in select foods:

Excluding the fortified products (essentially supplements added to food), fish is by far the best source of vitamin D.

If you eat a lot of fish, or consume cod liver oil regularly, you probably get a decent chunk of your needed amount from that alone, which is great.

Keep in mind that when you cook food that contains vitamin D, anywhere from 10-50% of it is lost, which means those numbers in the table are more than you’ll actually get.

2. Sun

The sun is by far the best (and cheapest!) source of vitamin D.

You don’t need to know all the little steps. What you do need to know is that UVB radiation from sunlight is absorbed in the skin, which then reacts with cholesterol to form vitamin D.

However, we can’t actually use this form of vitamin D. Instead, it goes through a few conversions until it finally is turned into calcidiol, the active form of vitamin D that cells can use.

Note that skin needs to be actually exposed to sunlight in order for vitamin D production to occur. This is why it’s more common to become vitamin D deficient during winter months when you’re all covered up.

3. Supplements

Food alone usually isn’t enough.

So what if you live somewhere where you can’t get enough sun, either?

That’s when supplements are necessary. You can find them on the shelf at most pharmacies, drug stores, or online.

Vitamin D2 and D3

There are 2 common types of vitamin D. Vitamin D2 is found in certain plants, while D3 is found in animal products/fish.

Vitamin D3 is about twice as good at being converted to the active form of vitamin D. While most supplements are vitamin D3, double check the ingredient label before you buy them.


How Much Vitamin D Do You Need?

The last main part of this guide is to determine how much vitamin D you actually need to not be deficient.

Here is a table of the current recommendations in Canada, which are very similar to the U.S. and Europe:

However, many recent studies have called these recommendations into question.

They assert that the recommended intakes should be higher for all age groups, closer to the current upper limits. The current maximum safe dosage is 10,000 IU per day for an adult.

I wouldn’t recommend hopping straight to that amount until more research has been done on it. However, you might benefit from getting more vitamin D if you’re hovering around or below the current recommended amounts.

For reference, most studies I’ve linked to in this guide have adult patients on 4,000-5,000 IU per day.

How Much Vitamin D Do You Get From The Sun?

The actual amount you get from the sun will vary depending on a lot of factors, not all of which are in your control (like UV index).

There’s no easy way to calculate it. Here’s what I found:

“If you’re fair skinned, experts say going outside for 10 minutes in the midday sun – in shorts and a tank top with no sunscreen – will give you enough radiation to produce about 10,000 IU.”

So it’s not too difficult to get a good amount of vitamin D.

Note that it said “if you’re fair skinned.” The darker your skin is, the less UVB you will absorb, and the less vitamin D you will produce. I’m not sure exactly how much extra time you need in the sun if you have dark skin, but be aware that you’ll need a bit more.

Can You Overdose? It’s possible, but very unlikely. You would need to have an incredibly high vitamin D intake for an extended period of time.

There is one final thing I need to address to wrap up this guide: skin cancer. I am by no means telling you to lie out in the sun all day. Get some sun, but don’t get burned.

Any sunburn will accelerate aging, and even worse, it will elevate your risk of skin cancer.

There you have it, everything you need to know about vitamin D. Enjoy the sun and your good health!

Watch this video – WARNING: Never Take Vitamin D Without This Or You’ll Have A Heart Attack

Written by Dale Cudmore

Author Bio:

Dale is a nutrition writer, chemical engineer & professional soccer player who sees the results of proper nutrition every day in training and games. Connect with him at DaleCudmore.com

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

The Ultimate Guide to Cholesterol – What You Should Know


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Cholesterol plays a vital role in our health, and is often confused as the enemy. Here’s how cholesterol works and what really causes heart disease.

Recent research has shown that cholesterol isn’t the big bad dietary wolf that everyone fears. In fact, there’s something worse than cholesterol that we should all be mindful of – and most of us eat it every single day.

What Is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a sterol, or modified steroid, that is an essential structural component of cell membranes. It is necessary for making sure that membranes are permeable so that fluids and fatty compounds can properly be transported into the blood plasma. 

Cholesterol mainly builds and maintains cell membranes, but it’s also responsible for:

  • Producing reproductive and stress hormones
  • Creating bile
  • Converting sun exposure to vitamin D
  • Metabolizing fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K)
  • Insulating nerve fibers

Cholesterol is so necessary for these critical body processes that our bodies make 85 percent of it. That’s right – contrary to popular beliefs, cholesterol isn’t a dietary opponent – it’s a critical element of wellness that the body creates.

Even if you don’t eat a speck of cholesterol, you’ll have a significant amount in your body because you need it to survive.

The liver produces approximately 800 to 1,000 milligrams of cholesterol per day. The rest of it, about 15 to 20 percent, comes from dietary sources like beef, pork, chicken, fish, shellfish, egg yolks, and dairy products (like milk and cheese).

The cholesterol that we eat isn’t as efficiently put to use as the cholesterol produced by the liver. When what we eat does raise our levels, the liver produces less. So dietary cholesterol has little effect on the actual circulating levels of cholesterol – the ones that get blamed for heart disease risk.

This is where people start to get confused, because many medical professionals have implicated cholesterol in heart disease problems for decades.

So let’s dig into the most common cholesterol myths.


3 Biggest Cholesterol Myths

While heart disease is a real health problem, cholesterol isn’t necessarily to blame.

Let’s correct these myths, and explore the real culprits in heart disease risk and cardiovascular problems.

1. Cholesterol is dangerous to your health

As discussed above, cholesterol is essential for wellness. Your hormones would be a wreck without enough cholesterol. Your fat-soluble vitamin levels would be insufficient. Your cells would also be starved of proper nutrients and fluid levels.

The general culture talks about cholesterol as if it’s a fat-food monster that clogs your arteries and tries to kill you. Which brings us to:

2. Cholesterol causes heart disease

Cholesterol does not cause heart disease. There are too many factors in heart disease risk to blame one thing, and cholesterol has taken the blame long enough. In the age of low-cholesterol diets, heart disease has only risen, not dropped. Heart disease now accounts for one in every three deaths, up from one in every four.

3. Lowering cholesterol with drugs or diet makes you healthier

Again, we’ve only seen a rise in heart disease deaths since low-cholesterol diets and cholesterol-fighting medication have become popular.

Recent research even shows that older folks with higher levels of cholesterol live as long or longer than those with low levels. So, if cholesterol is the great killer that we’ve believed it to be, then why isn’t research agreeing?


Understanding the Different Types of Cholesterol

There are two kinds of cholesterol: the “good” (HDL) and “bad” cholesterol (LDL). In reality, there isn’t anything inherently good or bad about either.

HDL cholesterol, or the “good” kind, is short for “high-density lipoprotein.” It collects cholesterol from the bloodstream and returns it to the liver to be broken down. It got a reputation for being good by sending cholesterol away, but keep in mind that it’s the liver that synthesizes this cholesterol in this first place – so it can’t be all bad.

LDL cholesterol, which stands for “low-density lipoprotein,” is referred to as the “bad” kind because it transports cholesterol to tissues. However, remember that cholesterol is required for hormones and numerous other body processes, and the only way that these can happen is if cells have access to it.

While dietary intake of cholesterol can slightly influence LDL and HDL levels, this is primarily influenced by lifestyle and genetics.

But cholesterol isn’t the marker that should be associated with heart disease. In fact, there are several markers that are legitimately more tied to heart disease risk than cholesterol, and the one thing they all have in common is inflammation.

Inflammatory Markers Are the New “Bad” Cholesterol

LDL got its bad rap because oxidized LDL can lead to plaque build-up in the arteries.

Oxidation happens when inflammation damages cells, and they start functioning abnormally.

Inflammation is the body’s response to injury, but not always in the obvious sense. Injury can happen on the inside of the body as a result of a rogue immune system, poor dietary choices, and chronic conditions.

Doctors use certain blood markers to track inflammation in the body. While genetics can certainly make someone more prone to inflammatory problems, lifestyle factors also have a major role. It’s just that cholesterol is no longer the ultimate problem.

From a dietary standpoint, trans fats and refined sugars ramp up inflammation much faster than foods that contain cholesterol.  

Unlike cholesterol, which the body produces, trans fats and refined sugars won’t be synthesized in the body if we don’t eat enough. In fact, they aren’t needed at all, and can be quite damaging in a number of ways.

Trans fats are damaged fats that occur as a result of overprocessing foods, and are not the heart-healthy fats that are found in nature. Trans fats are often considered bad because they’re linked with raising “bad” cholesterol, but it isn’t that they raise LDL so much as they damage the existing LDL cells, resulting in plaque deposits that can cause problems.

LDL got its bad rap because oxidized LDL can lead to plaque build-up in the arteries. Oxidation happens when inflammation damages cells, and they start functioning abnormally.

So how do you know if inflammation is your problem? These two tests should be considered alongside the standard cholesterol and triglycerides measurements to determine actual heart disease or chronic disease risk:

  • C-reactive protein test
  • Homocysteine test

C-reactive protein measures specific inflammatory markers in the body that can help to determine inflammation levels as well as the potential for narrowing of arteries.

While the American Heart Association (which still blames cholesterol for problems) doesn’t think it’s necessary, numerous integrative practitioners use this as a gold standard for determining problematic inflammatory risk.

Homocysteine, a chemical found in the blood, is produced in response to methionine, an amino acid. While everyone needs a certain amount of homocysteine in their blood, elevated levels can be indicative of inflammation and can be irritating for blood vessels, leading to arterial hardening and risk for heart attack.

Homocysteine can become elevated in response to poor dietary choices, but it can also be higher in individuals with certain genetic mutations that require harder-to-get nutrients to keep it in check.

Specifically, the genetic mutation called MTHFR indicates difficulty absorbing critical vitamins. When homocysteine is elevated in individuals who have MTHFR mutations, it’s often because they can’t properly metabolize the B vitamins that keep methionine and other body processes in check.

To offset this genetic mutation, it is recommended that we limit processed foods and eat a diet rich in high-quality animal products and green vegetables.


4 Ways to Reduce Inflammation with Diet and Lifestyle

Since heart disease is much more complex than just using cholesterol as a scapegoat, understanding the root causes of heart (and most other) disease can lead to an overall preventive lifestyle.

Inflammation is more dangerous to heart health than cholesterol, so it’s important to understand that it can be dramatically impacted with dietary and other lifestyle choices.

1. Eat Anti-Inflammatory Green Vegetables

Green vegetables are rich in folate, antioxidants, and fiber, giving them a trifecta of healthful benefits that not only help to prevent inflammation, but can also help to reverse chronic health problems after they’ve started.

2. Eat More Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids – like those found in salmon, mackerel, and cod liver oil – differ from other types of fats in that they’re potently anti-inflammatory. Omega-6 fatty acids, commonly found in nuts and seeds, are more pro-inflammatory, but are often eaten in far greater amounts than omega-3s.

Eating omega-3s on a daily basis and limiting intake of omega-6 fatty acids can help to restore balance to this fat ratio, leading to decreased inflammation and improved heart health.

3. Skip Trans Fats, Refined Sugars, and Processed Foods

Trans fats, refined sugars and processed foods can be especially harmful if you have existing inflammatory conditions, known MTHFR mutations, or a family history of heart disease.

Not only do these foods lead to inflammation, they can also wreak havoc on the digestive system as well as contribute to weight problems and hormone imbalance.

4. Manage Stress and Sleep

You can eat all the right foods, exercise, and skip detrimental habits like smoking, but if you’re stressed to the max and sleeping poorly, then you could still have inflammatory markers that are high.

While there is no one-size-fits-all approach to achieving perfect sleep and reduced stress levels, certain habits can contribute to healthy balance:

  • Regular exercise
  • A bedtime routine
  • Reduced smartphone and computer use at night
  • Decreased intake of caffeine, alcohol, and other stimulants
  • Healthy stress outlets, like therapy or meditation

Watch this video – What NO ONE has told you about CHOLESTEROL! Doctor explains.

Written by Aimee McNew

Author Bio:

Aimee McNew is a Certified Nutritionist who specializes in women’s health, thyroid problems, infertility, and digestive wellness. She ate her way back to health using a Paleo diet, lost 80 pounds, and had a healthy baby after numerous miscarriages. She focuses on simple nutrition practices that promote long-lasting results.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

Here are 8 Easy Tricks to Improve Your Memory


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Exercise is not only important for your body, it is also extremely important for your mind. Who we are as people is shaped by our ideologies, our habits, our fears and our hopes—all of these things are dependent on your memory.

Hitting the gym is great for your physique, but strengthening your ability to retain information will need a different kind of exercise.

Our nervous system is the messenger network that facilitates communication throughout the body, to and from your brain. Your brain is like the master computer that stores all your memories and relays how to act based on your body’s interactions.

On a basic level, neurons, or communication chemicals, are responsible for our experiences and memories in life, and they set us up for future experiences.

Short-term memories may only last seconds to hours, long-term memories last from hours to months, and lasting long-term memories may stay with you for months through your lifetime.

Memory can be divided into three types—short term, long-term, and lasting long-term. Short-term memories may only last seconds to hours, long-term memories last from hours to months, and lasting long-term memories may stay with you for months through your lifetime.

As far as functionality, there are other types of memory, including declarative and non-declarative, and immediate and working memory.

Your brain goes through three basic phases when it comes to memory—encoding, consolidating, and retrieving.

Encoding is when you are taking in new information, or you perceive it, and relate it to your past experiences.

Consolidation is when your brain stores this new information so that it can be used later.

When the time is right, your mind will access or retrieve the stored information for use.

Crucial elements to creating a lasting memory include the following:

  • A good challenge
  • Upward mobility
  • A rewarding experience
  • A new lesson

Dementia, or a decline in mental ability, is very common among the aging population. Alzheimer’s disease, a more severe form of dementia, affects as many as 5 million people living in the United States, and unfortunately the exact cause of it is unknown.

What we do know is that staying mentally active can have amazing protective benefits for your mental health. To make sure your memory is running at tip-top performance, make sure that you exercise your brain.

Here are 8 techniques you can use to strengthen your memories and make them last:

Organization

When trying to remember something, look for patterns. How something is organized, or clustered together, can help greatly when it comes to trying to remember details. “Chunking” is the term used to refer to a type of cognitive compression by which we are able to pair information into chunks that are more memorable than random tidbits of information.

Tip: if you want to remember someone’s birthday and it’s towards the end of December—try remembering that it’s close to Christmas (and maybe think about doubling up on the gift situation).

Categorizing

Categorizing information into objective (logical and well-recognized categories) or subjective (any way that might help you, even if the information seems unrelated) groups is useful to retaining information that you have just learned.

For example, if you want to remember someone’s birthday and it is towards the end of December—try remembering that it’s close to Christmas (and maybe think about doubling up on the gift situation).

Visualization

Mental imagery is a technique that can help you reinforce your memory toward specific actions or cognitive activities. Think about to act of doing something ahead of time, and put yourself in a visual thought process of what it will actually be like—this can help you succeed at complex activities with many steps and with future decision making.

This is because images are pretty set in stone, while a slew of information may be more abstract. Visualization in a way forces your attention toward a specific point, leaving no room for ambiguity. When it comes down to images versus facts and ease of remembrance, images typically take home the gold.

If you’re trying to remember something like which foods are Paleo and to stay on track with your Paleo goals, try this: picture yourself at the grocery store or farmer’s market and imagine you are selecting nothing but non-processed foods and foods as close to that of our ancestors as possible; maybe even think about your family or friends being there to support your purchases.

Visualize yourself enjoying this, and visualize it often. Over time, you will no longer need to remind yourself of this healthy habit; it can become part of your daily practice with a little bit of discipline.

Repetition

Everyone has fallen victim to forgetfulness, and this often happens when you have only done something once before, or you were only told something one time. Once is usually not enough for something to stick to your memory.

So lather, rinse, repeat. The more you practice something, the more neural networks will strengthen to increase signals transmitted to and from your brain. But repeating something over and over in a short interval is not the best technique for memory.

What works better is squeezing some time in between your repetitions. This is also known as spaced retrieval, because you are forcing yourself to retrieve a piece of information over an interval of time.

When you meet a new person and you find it difficult to remember their name, try to repeat their name in your head every 10 minutes or so, or force yourself to address them by name when you are talking to them.

Rest and Getting Enough Sleep

One day is rarely enough time for memories to make a lasting impression on your brain. While you rest, your body is replenishing itself for the next day by balancing out your hormones to support healthy growth and development.

Sleep is also a key factor in optimizing memory consolidation, but not a two-hour nap type of sleep, but a real full-night’s rest type of sleep. During slow-wave sleep, or deep sleep, is when your memories will consolidate the best.

Eating Breakfast

Don’t let breakfast escape your routine. It doesn’t matter how busy or lazy you are, or how much you think skipping breakfast is going to help you lose weight. After a good night’s sleep, to help lock in memories, breakfast is going to help get important nutrients into your body to further tie your memories down (it also helps to kick-start your metabolism for the day).

Eating breakfast was shown to have a significant benefit on not only memory, but also school achievement and cognitive function and performance. Omega-3 fatty acids like those found in flaxseeds and fish are most beneficial to your memory.

Eliminating Excess Stress

Chronic stress is always going to be the little devil on your shoulder for many reasons, including retaining information. Excess stress is going to literally get in the way of how your brain functions to store and retrieve memories.

Stress sends out messenger chemicals known as glucocorticoid hormones, which will bind to receptors and prevent normal memory consolidation and retrieval. Spatial learning and memory, the type of memory that helps you remember locations and relate objects, are diminished with excess stress, as well.

Staying Mentally Active Throughout Life

Your mental strength is one of those things that abides by a “use it or lose it” philosophy. In a study of 700 dementia-free patients where general cognitive decline was analyzed, people who were observed to participate in more cognitively-stimulating activities showed a slower rate of decline in their episodic and working memory. Your mental strength is one of those things that abides by a “use it or lose it” philosophy.

Activities  that are cognitively stimulating include things like reading, writing, doing puzzles and playing certain computer games.

Other studies have shown that mental decline was about 48% faster in those who didn’t actively stimulate their mind throughout life, as compared to those who engaged in mental activity more frequently.

Writing Down What You Need to Remember

Writing down what you need to remember will help you not only because it’s on paper, but because you will force yourself to use more of your body. Not only will you have the memory in your mind, but you will also see it with your eyes.

Looking at the note multiple times a day can help make the memory last even longer. In addition, you can repeat whatever it is that you need to remember aloud, to add your sense of hearing.

Taking notes in a class was shown to be more effective for long-term memory when it was done with a pen and paper versus with a laptop. Keep this in mind when trying to hold onto information.

Watch this video – 11 Quick Exercises to Improve Your Memory by 90%

Written by Liz Lang

Author Bio:

Liz Lang is a Clinical Research Coordinator with the Southern California Institute for Research and Education in the field of Gastroenterology. Liz graduated from the University of California, Irvine with a degree in Public Health Sciences. She has an insatiable thirst to learn how the human body works in order to keep people healthy. When Liz isn’t in the clinic, she enjoys exploring nature, yoga, and trying new things (especially food!).

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

How Earthing Can Really Slow Aging and Calm Inflammation


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Earthing – Can Walking Barefoot Really Slow Aging and Calm Inflammation?

When was the last time you went barefoot outside for your health? Earthing might be just what your body needs to prevent illness and even ease pain.

There’s some interesting research that suggests going barefoot can realign your body to the earth’s negative charge. While the science behind this idea is still budding, it may be worth a try to kick off your shoes once in awhile.

Here’s what it means to “go earthing”, and how research claims it can impact your health and wellbeing.

What is Earthing?

“Earthing” is the practice of reconnecting the soles of your feet with the earth by regularly walking barefoot outside. This could mean anything from gardening barefoot in your backyard, taking a walk on the beach, or even setting out for a hike on a trail through the forest.

Also known as “grounding”, earthing is said to have several health benefits that come from reconnecting with the earth’s energy.


The Benefits of Earthing

Our body is essentially one big electrical system: from our neurotransmitter signals to our heartbeat, we run on a regular electric current to keep us going.

Just like our bodies, the earth has its own current in the form of electrons. When we make direct contact with the earth’s surface, these electrons are able to flow through our skin and interact with our bodies in a positive way. Our skin is a great conductor of electricity and is extremely sensitive to outside electrical current even in small amounts.

It is suggested that this limitless supply of beneficial energy is an under-appreciated resource for preventing disease and maintaining your health.

Benefits of earthing include:

The theory is that we receive these benefits by re-aligning our own electrical system with that of the earth’s.

Studies on other electrical systems similar to the one in our bodies, like cables that transmit television signals, show that when they’re “grounded” into the earth, signal interference disappears. This led to the idea that grounding ourselves to the earth regularly could have a similar stabilizing effect on our own electrical system and organs.


Can Earthing Really Slow Aging?

How can walking around barefoot help keep you looking young? Just like certain foods we eat contain antioxidants that help fight free radicals, the earth’s negative electrons do the same.

Free radicals are generated in our bodies in response to toxins in our environment, including pollution and processed foods. If left unchecked by antioxidants, these free radicals can damage your DNA and cause signs of aging, including wrinkles and the development of disease.

The earth’s negatively charged electrons act as antioxidants in your body, neutralizing these positively charged free radicals before they can cause damage. This could help slow aging by preserving your DNA.


Can Earthing Reduce Inflammation?

Have you noticed that when your body is injured, it becomes inflamed? Think of when you cut your finger or experience an ankle sprain: the area around the injury swells up. This is because your body sends protective compounds to the site of your injury. However, these compounds also act as free radicals that can damage healthy tissue in the surrounding areas.

Similar to the way earthing fights aging, the electrons you receive from walking around barefoot can neutralize these free radicals. By reducing tissue and DNA damage, earthing can also signal to the body to stop releasing inflammatory compounds, which can reduce overall inflammation.

It’s important to remember that inflammation doesn’t occur only in response to a visible physical injury. It can also occur internally in response to a disease like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or some other types of stress inside your body.


What about Stress, Insomnia, and Pain?

If your stress levels are high, you’re having trouble sleeping, or you’re in pain, it may be worth a try to take up an earthing routine.

In a study exploring the effect of earthing on human physiology, grounding had a positive electrical effect on the left hemisphere of participants’ brains that activated their parasympathetic nervous system. This could help reduce stress and encourage relaxation.

If you can’t get outside regularly, grounding mats may be a way to reap the benefits of earthing while indoors. These are mats with a cord that you can plug into an outlet to connect to the earth’s electrical field. Lay the mat on your bed, underneath your desk, or anywhere in your home for an easy way to de-stress.

Research suggests that earthing with a grounding mat can reduce the production of cortisol. High cortisol levels are associated with stress and high blood pressure, so bringing cortisol back to normal could have a stress-reducing effect.

If you have trouble sleeping, these lower cortisol levels might help with that insomnia. One study found that people who sleep with earthing mats experience more sound sleep and wake up less than those that don’t.

Pain can also cause stress and insomnia, and earthing might help with reducing chronic pain. One study found that participants that slept using earthing pads experienced reduced symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, PMS, sleep apnea and hypertension. This may be due to the ability of earthing to reduce inflammation and stress, both of which exacerbate pain.


How to Go Earthing

The cheapest and easiest way to go earthing is to walk barefoot outside in your yard. The more you can be in direct contact with the earth, the better!

If you don’t have a yard or anywhere you can regularly get your feet in the grass or on the beach sand, you can try investing in “earthing mats” that are connected to the earth’s electrical field. Set one under your desk while you’re working, in your bathroom, your kitchen; anywhere your feet spend a lot of time.

Watch this video – Earthing: What is it & How to do it

The Bottom Line

While the validity of earthing is controversial, it may be worth a try. The theory is that by reconnecting with the earth’s surface, we can flood our systems with negative electrons to help realign our bodies to fight pain and disease.

While more research needs to be done on the benefits of walking barefoot, you can’t doubt that walking through a green field or sandy beach naturally feels good.

Written by Megan Patiry

Author Bio:

Megan is an inquisitive nutrition and wellness writer harboring an editorial love affair with the decadent and the nutritious. She is a dedicated researcher in all areas of ancestral health, a certified specialist in fitness nutrition, personal trainer, and professional almond milk latte addict.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

Simple Deep Breathing Exercise to Help Beat Chronic Stress


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Deep Breathing- The Most Powerful Health Hack

We live in a fast-paced world where constant access to technology and connectivity has dramatically accelerated productivity and progress.

However, the busier our lives get, the greater the demands on the body’s stress hormones in order to cope with the never-ending barrage of emails, late night BlackBerry messages and early morning alarms.

Ironically, one of the most primal actions of the human body may be the answer to increasing your resilience, balancing stress hormone production and overcoming the frenetic pace of today’s workplace. We all do it, every single day: breathe.

Breathing is essential for life, giving us the vital oxygen our heart, lungs and cells need. But there is also a powerful relationship between your breath and thoughts. Your breath has a tremendous influence on your thoughts and physiology, just like your thoughts have a tremendous influence on your breath.

Studies show that deep breathing can help reduce anxiety and depression, lower high blood pressure levels, increase energy, relax muscular tension and relieve stress and feelings of being overwhelmed by tasks and work demands.

Throughout our existence, the physiology of breathing has remained the same, yet something has changed. Busy, stressful days and negative thoughts all impact the stress response system, increasing stress hormones (cortisol and adrenaline) that raise your blood pressure, blood sugars, heart rate and breath rate.

Increased stress also reduces your breath quality, leading to short and shallow breaths that trigger your “fight or flight” sympathetic nervous system, your survival switch that warns your body of incoming danger. Too many days stuck in this “go-go-go” sympathetic overdrive mode will drain your body, impair concentration and lead to poor memory and productivity.

In contrast, when you sleep, you inhale deeply as your diaphragm, the biggest muscle in your body, contracts and relaxes. This type of deep breathing activates your parasympathetic “rest and digest” nervous system and vagus nerve in your brain, the signal that tells your body to relax and remain calm. This parasympathetic state is what “builds up” the proverbial candle you too often burn at both ends during stressful and busy days.

Some stressors are unavoidable, and a simple reality of your working environment. For example, a recent study found that middle managers have far greater cortisol output than CEOs and presidents of corporations.

The researchers concluded that not knowing when the stressor will come (i.e. when more work will hit your plate) is a potent stressor that puts you into “fight or flight” overdrive. Similarly, workers who do not have defined roles or expectations in their jobs also have dramatically elevated stress hormone levels.

Research also shows that people who react strongly to daily hassles – having to wait in line, being stuck in traffic, having to stay late at work – have significantly higher cortisol stress levels. Your breathing may be the ultimate health hack for getting yourself back on track.

While you can’t necessarily change your job, how busy you are, or demands at home, you can improve your resilience or capacity to cope with stress.

Let’s take a look at a simple breathing program that you don’t have to be a yogi to do! Try it for just 10 minutes and pay attention to the physiological effects you feel.


Deep Breathing Simple Exercise

Deep diaphragmatic breathing is a simple exercise and powerful health hack to reboot your breathing. Find a quiet space and spend a few minutes exercising your diaphragm with the following steps:

1. Start by lying on the floor with your legs bent, feet flat on the floor.

2. Place a book or similar-weight object on your belly, then rest your arms on the floor next to you, palms facing up.

3. Close your eyes and inhale through your nose. As you inhale, push the book (i.e. your belly) up toward the ceiling. Inhale for two seconds.

4. Hold your breath for one second.

5. Then, exhale through your mouth with pursed lips (i.e., like you’re blowing out birthday candles) for three seconds, and feel your belly fall down toward your spine.

6. Continue this process for 5 minutes, then stop.

Goal: Build up to 8-10 minutes over the course of several weeks or a month.

You may notice while trying this exercise that breathing might feel more challenging than usual, and it may be difficult for your belly to rise up during inhalations. This will let you know you’re likely a chest or “pump-handle” breather.

Chest breathing encourages short, shallow breaths in your upper chest and doesn’t allow for the full volume of oxygen to reach your lungs. However, keep practicing and you’ll soon become comfortable with the proper method of breathing.

(Read: The Best 10-Minute Meditation)

Once you feel comfortable doing this lying on the floor, there are a series of progressions you should do to help ingrain this deep, diaphragmatic breathing pattern:

Practice your breathing while sitting. Place your hand on your belly instead of a book and perform the same exercise as above, simply seated in a chair.

Work your way up to a standing position. Stand with your feet hip- to shoulder-width apart, close your eyes, and place one hand on your belly. After a few breaths, remove your hand and continue with the deep belly breathing.

Get moving! Start with a 10-minute walk. Inhale every 2-3 steps and exhale for the same number of steps. Try to recreate the rhythm you felt when practicing on the floor and in the chair.

Your breath is the connection between your mind and your body, and between your brain and your stress system. Take control of your breath to calm stress hormones, improve your focus and increase your resiliency. You don’t need any fancy

equipment or expensive supplements. You can practice in your car, on the subway, or even in the office. You just need to sit still and breathe.

(Read: 9 Ways to Beat Chronic Stress)

You’ll take about one billion breaths in your lifetime, and whether they help calm your body and mind or accelerate stress and aging is up to you. Make a simple change and discover how breathing can upgrade your health, wellness and performance.

Happy breathing!

Watch this video – Relieve Stress & Anxiety with Simple Breathing Techniques

Written by Dr. Marc Bubbs

Author Bio:

Dr. Marc Bubbs, ND is a Naturopathic Doctor, Strength Coach, Author, Speaker, and Blogger practicing in Toronto, Canada. He believes that diet, exercise, and lifestyle factors have the most profound impact on your overall health and performance. Marc is the author of The Paleo Project – A 21st Guide to Looking Leaner, Getting Stronger, & Living Longer and currently serves as the Sports Nutrition Lead for Canadian Men’s Olympic Basketball Team.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

How Chronic Stress Can Lead to Signs of Alzheimers?


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Science Links Stress Hormone Cortisol to Early Signs of Alzheimers

We all deal with stress on a regular basis, but when it gets to be too much, science says it can lead to dementia, like Alzheimer’s disease. Here’s what you need to know.

If you’re feeling chronically stressed out, you’re not alone. Tension stemming from work life, relationships, money, and more has become the norm, but this mental state is directly affecting our health by weakening our immune system, causing digestive health issues, and even pointing towards cognitive decline.

So, are we all doomed? Not necessarily. Here’s how to tell when your stress levels are above normal healthy areas, and how to prevent yourself from falling prey to chronic stress.

Chronic Stress vs. Acute Stress

There are two different kinds of stress, and they affect the body differently. Acute stress is the type of stress that many of us experience regularly from things like work demands and everyday obligations.  

Acute stress can be helpful in small doses, as it triggers the body to release certain hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline, which can be helpful when dealing with the stressful situation.

When your stress response is responding appropriately, the increase in cortisol levels that are released during periods of stress go back down once that specific threat has left.

Chronic stress is when your body gets stuck in a fight-or-flight response. When this happens, the stress hormone cortisol is released, causing your heart rate and breathing to speed up and your digestive system to slow down.

While this system works really well when you are dealing with an actual physical threat, such as being chased by a wild animal, this does not serve us well when dealing with everyday stress.

When the stress response is chronically activated, you risk major health issues like obesity, heart disease, and cancer.

Before we dive into how chronic stress impacts cognitive function, let’s take a closer look at cortisol and the role cortisol plays in our body’s stress response.


What Is Cortisol?

Often known as the “stress hormone”, cortisol plays a very important role when it comes to our body’s stress response. When you are under stress, your body releases cortisol, which increases glucose levels in the blood and puts other functions on “hold” that may not be completely necessary to fight the stressor at hand. This is where that fight-or-flight response comes in, and things like the immune and digestive systems slow down.

One of the issues with chronic cortisol exposure and stress is that after long periods of excessive cortisol exposure, you may be at a higher risk of developing many different health conditions. These include:


The Mental Health Consequences of Chronic Stress

While we know that chronic stress can lead to physical health issues, it can also affect our mental health.

Studies show that by-products of stress hormones act as sedatives in the body. When you are under chronic amounts of stress over an extended period of time, it’s common to experience symptoms like low energy and even depression.

In a recent study, participants engaged in cognitive testing that looked at memory, abstract reasoning, and visual perception. The results found those with higher cortisol levels had difficulty with memory and visual perception tasks – and even linked higher cortisol levels to lower brain volume.

Today, chronic stress is a driving cause of Alzheimer’s disease, and can even make symptoms of this disease worse. Another study looking at the connection between stress and Alzheimer’s found that participants with cognitive impairment also have high cortisol levels.

This connection is likely due to the fact that chronic stress triggers inflammatory mediators in the brain, primarily in the hippocampus. This specific type of inflammation is strongly linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

A study conducted by The University of Gothenburg in Sweden also makes a connection between stress and Alzheimer’s disease. They found that “information stress”, or the demand for handling a rapid flow of daily information, can cause mild cognitive impairment, a precursor of Alzheimer’s disease.

One shocking observation found that patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in this study were relatively young, with an average age of 64 (early onset of Alzheimer’s is considered under age 65). This indicates the dangers of dealing with chronic levels of stress and pressure on a regular basis.


5 Tips on Preventing Chronic Stress

Now that we understand how chronic stress can lead to cognitive impairment, it’s important to take preventative steps to gain control of your stress levels. Here are the best ways you can get your stress under control, preventing early cognitive decline and other health issues.

1. Eat a Nutrient-Rich Diet

Believe it or not, what you eat can impact how well your body responds to stress. Consuming a nutrient-dense diet that includes complex carbohydrates, healthy fats, and clean protein can help stabilize blood sugar levels, which is an important part of balancing hormone levels and supporting a positive mood.

Here are some of the best foods to enjoy to help stabilize blood sugar levels to support your body’s stress response and hormone balance:

Make sure you’re also eating enough calories each day. With so many fad diets out there, many people simply aren’t consuming enough calories to sustain overall health. This is bad news, because not getting enough calories in your diet is actually linked to an increase in cortisol levels.

The total number of calories you need depends on your age, activity level, gender, height, and weight.

As a general guideline, adult women typically need 1,600 to 2,400 calories per day, while the average man needs 2,000 to 3,000 calories per day. While the exact number is going to be different for each person, you don’t want to go below the low end of these daily calorie requirements.

2. Breathe Deeply

Something as simple as the way you breathe can significantly reduce levels of chronic stress. When you breathe deeply, your body will literally respond by telling your brain to relax, which can help lower blood pressure, lower heart rate, and slow rapid breathing.

Try to practice deep breathing every single day, and especially during periods of increased stress. You can start to practice deep breathing as often as you can in about one-minute sessions, and more if you are feeling especially tense.

Mindfulness is another great way to reduce stress. You can practice mindfulness daily by setting aside five minutes and finding a quiet place to sit and just notice your body. Take a few minutes to be mindful of your breath, and take notice of when your thoughts start to wander. Acknowledge your wandering thoughts without judgment and just bring your attention back to your breathing. Sit for five to ten minutes and just be present, coming back to your breath each time you start to become distracted. Practice this daily.

This can become an essential tool in combating stress during other moments of your day. You will literally train your brain to be mindful of how your body is feeling during periods of stress, and then bring your awareness to your breath to help calm both your mind and body.

3. Improve Your Sleep Habits

Sleep is essential for overall health, and it certainly plays a role in how stressed out you feel. One study found that 47 percent of Americans lie awake at night because of stress! It’s a double-edged sword, because not getting enough sleep can also make you even more stressed out.

Try to get at least seven to eight hours of uninterrupted sleep per night, and set a calming bedtime routine to wind down your day each evening. An hour or more of calming music, reading, a warm bath, or any other kind of relaxing activity you enjoy can greatly improve your overall quality of sleep.

4. Learn to Say “No” More Often

If you tend to say “yes” to everything that comes your way, then you may be dealing with chronic stress due to overcommitment. It’s so easy to overcommit, but it definitely doesn’t do our health or our stress levels any good.

Make it a point to start saying no to the obligations that no longer serve you. Start by saying that you will think about it before immediately responding with a yes, then give yourself time to truly consider if you have time for another commitment.

Just taking the time to pause can be life changing, as it can really help free up more time for you to practice self-care (a biggie, see below) and reduce your overall stress levels.

5. Practice Self-Care

Self-care is one of the most important steps you can take to reducing the stress load you carry. Make it a priority to take some time for yourself each week, and if you can manage self-care daily, do it!

Even making time for little things, like a five-minute meditation or a brisk walk, can significantly help to reduce your stress levels. Then, schedule in time for something a little bigger each week, like going out to lunch with a friend. These may seem like small changes, but trust us, they make a big difference to your wellbeing.

Taking care of yourself is an essential part of reducing stress and lowering cortisol levels.

Watch this video – The Effects of Chronic Stress on the Brain | Brain Talks | Being Patient Alzheimer’s


The Bottom Line

Chronic stress can significantly impair our overall quality of life and can throw our hormone balance out of whack. The chronic exposure to elevated cortisol levels has been found to hold some pretty detrimental effects on the body and cognitive function, so it is our job to take matters into our own hands and turn things around to prevent this from happening.

Evaluate what changes you can make in your diet, get into bed earlier, learn that saying no can be the biggest gift to yourself, and take care of yourself each and every day! With just a handful of steps, you can help reign in your chronic stress and safeguard both your physical and mental health for the long run.

Written by Rebecca Jacobs

Author Bio:

Rebecca Jacobs N.C is a Certified Holistic Nutrition Consultant, specializing in digestive and women’s health. She takes a holistic approach to wellness, doesn’t believe in “dieting,” and believes that healthy eating must be delicious. Rebecca is also a recipe developer and creates healthy alternatives to traditionally unhealthy foods.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

Paleo Dairy-Free Naturally Sweetened Salted Caramel Chia Seed Pudding


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Salted Caramel Chia Seed Pudding with Hazelnut Butter

Dig into this decadent chia seed pudding filled with toasted hazelnut butter and a dreamy caramel made with medjool dates.

Transform dessert into a healthier-for-you treat with superfood chia seeds. These tiny powerhouses are packed with fiber and have the ideal omega-3 to omega-6 ratio.

For the caramel, we swap the butter and gobs of sugar with medjool dates as a healthier alternative.

Note: To get a silky caramel date sauce, make sure that the dates are moist and fresh. If the dates are hard, they won’t blend as well and will require soaking in hot water for 5-10 minutes until soft enough to blend.

The hazelnut butter adds a warm flavor when mixed with the salted date caramel.

Luckily, making it at home is easy and is a great alternative to the store-bought version that is filled with refined sugar and artificial preservatives. To make it, simply blitz toasted hazelnuts in a food processor for a few minutes until it forms a paste.

If you want to enjoy this recipe as a quick breakfast, mix the hazelnut milk, honey and chia seeds the night before, then chill it in the fridge overnight.

In the morning, quickly put together the salted date caramel and hazelnut butter and divide it evenly between the chilled chia seed pudding cups. Top it all off with a few more toasted hazelnuts and enjoy!

Tips:

If you are in a hurry, you can warm the hazelnut milk before mixing it with the chia seeds, as the warmth will help the chia seeds expand faster.

If you like your caramel sauce with more texture and spread-like consistency, reduce the amount of water.

You can store the salted date caramel sauce in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. Use it as a topping for ice cream, brownies, or even as a sweet dip.

Salted Caramel Chia Seed Pudding with Hazelnut Butter

Recipe by Dina Hassan

Dig into this decadent chia pudding filled with toasted hazelnut butter and a dreamy caramel sauce.

Tools:

  • Medium bowl
  • Food processor

Ingredients for the chia pudding:

  • 2 cups organic hazelnut milk
  • 2 t raw honey
  • ½ cup chia seeds

Ingredients for the Salted Date Caramel & Hazelnut Butter:

  • 4 oz toasted hazelnuts
  • 7 oz pitted medjool dates
  • ½ t salt
  • ¼ cup water

Ingredients for the Topping:

  • 2 handfuls of toasted hazelnuts

Instructions to make the pudding:

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the hazelnut milk and raw honey. Stir until the raw honey is completely dissolved.
  • Stir in chia seeds and pour into two separate cups.
  • Place in the fridge and allow the seeds to expand for at least 3 hours or overnight.

Instructions for the Salted Date Caramel

  1. Place the hazelnuts in your food processor and process for 2-4 minutes until you have a fine powder; use a spatula to scrape down the sides as necessary.
  • Once the hazelnuts begin to form a paste, add the pitted dates and salt. Blend until you have a smooth butter.
  • Add the water gradually and process until the mixture is smooth and has a heavy but caramel-like consistency.

To serve:

Remove the chilled chia seed pudding from the fridge and distribute the salted date caramel evenly over the top of the pudding.

Top with extra toasted hazelnuts. Serve immediately or return to the fridge until ready to eat.

Watch this video – 6 Dairy Free Ice Cream Recipes (Vegan, Whole30, Sugar Free, Gluten Free) Nice Cream

Written by Dina Hassan

Author Bio:

Dina Hassan is a recipe developer, food photographer and food stylist. She believes that the key to a happy life is eating natural food, and when she’s not behind the camera, you can find her cooking up a new healthy recipe.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

9 Best Brain Foods to Sharpen Your Memory and Focus


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Imagine what you could accomplish in one day with unwavering, razor-sharp focus, concentration and memory.

Perhaps an extra boost of brain power would allow you to perform 50% better at work, which would result in the raise you’ve been hoping for.

Or maybe, increased mental stamina would allow you to finish the side projects you’ve been putting off – rather than feeling like your brain’s turned into a pile of mush by the end of the day.

Unfortunately today, instead of having mental focus, concentration and alertness, many of us feel clouded by a thick layer of brain fog that turns us into mildly functioning zombies, preventing us from reaching our full potential.

And while there are many factors that can contribute to cognitive decline (such as chronic stress), your diet also plays an essential role in how well your brain functions.

Now, I’ll tell you how to improve brain function through your diet in just a moment. But first, let’s take a look at the foods that can worsen brain function.

Foods That Sabotage Brain Function

If you’re looking to improve your brain function, begin by cutting out refined carbohydrates.

Although they’re not permitted on a Paleo diet, refined carbs can sabotage your brain function because they rapidly spike and crash blood sugar levels. Since your brain uses glucose for fuel, it depends on steady blood sugar levels to maintain focus, a stable mood and concentration.

Therefore, when you eat foods that send your blood glucose levels soaring high, followed by a sudden crash, your brain is directly impacted. Blood sugar spikes and crashes can promote feelings of confusion, irritability and fogginess as your body tries to normalize such rapid fluctuations. Your brain is made up of 60% fat. A low-fat diet does not help it function!

And while it’s not a specific food, low-fat diets can also impair optimal brain function. This is because your brain is made up of approximately 60% fat.

In fact, essential fatty acids such as omega-3’s are directly involved in the synthesis and function of brain neurotransmitters. This means that a low intake of essential fatty acids can lead to impaired memory, a low mood and a lack of attentiveness.

Gluten, a protein found in grains, is another brain-sabotaging nutrient. Studies show that gluten is linked to brain fog and impaired cognitive function. As a common food sensitivity that promotes inflammation in the body, gluten has been shown to cause symptoms such as anxiety, depression and even schizophrenia in the central nervous system.

In addition to gluten, it should also be mentioned that any food sensitivity may impair cognitive function. So, if you feel “fuzzy” on a regular basis, getting tested for food sensitivities or allergies may offer insight to your symptoms.

You can get tested for food sensitivities with an IgG food intolerance test at a Naturopathic clinic. Following an elimination administered by a qualified healthcare practitioner can also help discover underlying sensitivities.


9 Best Brain Boosting Foods

Now that you know which dietary factors can prevent your brain from functioning optimally, let’s take a look at the best foods for improving brain function.

1. Cold Water Fatty Fish

Cold water fatty fish, such as sardines, wild salmon and mackerel, can help improve brain function because they contain high levels of docosahexaenoic acid or DHA, an omega-3 essential fatty acid.

DHA is directly linked to brain development and memory. In fact, studies have shown that DHA is so critical to brain function that babies who receive a lack of omega-3’s from their mothers during pregnancy are at a greater risk for developing nerve and vision problems.

Furthermore, increasing dietary sources of DHA has been shown to improve memory in those with diets low in omega-3 essential fatty acids. Since omega-3 essential fatty acids cannot be made by our bodies, we must obtain them from dietary sources.

Important Note: Wild fish such as salmon, sardines and mackerel are recommended over other varieties of fish such as tuna and tilapia because they’re higher in omega-3’s and less likely to absorb high levels of environmental toxins.

Since most tilapia available to us is farmed, they are lower in omega-3 essential fatty acids. This is because farmed tilapia is usually fed a corn and soy diet, which are two foods that promote inflammation.

However, wild tilapia are shown to be higher in omega-3’s. If you do prefer to include tilapia in your diet once in awhile, learn how to choose it in this article: The Truth About Tilapia.

Lastly, always choose wild salmon over farmed salmon whenever possible. Farmed salmon has been shown to be contaminated with up to ten times more toxic environmental pollutants than wild salmon.

2. Walnuts

Walnuts are high in omega-3 essential fatty acids, which, as you now know, are mandatory for healthy cognitive function. Walnuts also contain several different antioxidants, such as polyphenols.

Polyphenols can help boost brain function because they help disarm free radicals in the body, which have been shown to destroy brain cells.

Since walnuts are an easy grab-n-go snack, they’re the perfect brain-boosting food to keep at your desk or take with you on the road. Maple Roasted Walnuts, anyone?

3. Chlorella

Chlorella is a green algae that can help boost brain power, thanks to a unique nutrient it contains called Chlorella Growth Factor, or CGF.

As suggested by the name, CGF can only be found in chlorella. And the reason why Chlorella Growth Factor can help improve brain function is because it contains the nucleic acids RNA and DNA.

RNA and DNA have many roles – but most importantly, they help the brain synthesize the proteins that regulate every biological function in our bodies. This includes the growth and development of our brains as well as how we move, think, behave and feel.

You can take chlorella as a nutritional supplement, or add chlorella powder or granules to your smoothies and green juices.

4. Berries

Blackberries, goji berries, blueberries, acai berries – any type of berry is beneficial for brain function. This is because berries are a rich source of antioxidant vitamins, such as vitamin C.

Vitamin C has been shown to help reduce the oxidative stress caused by toxins that can damage brain cells. In fact, the antioxidant activity in berries has also been shown to reduce and prevent symptoms of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

5. Hemp Seeds

Hemp seeds are an excellent source of omega-3 essential fatty acids and the antioxidant vitamin E.

Often referred to as “hemp hearts,” hemp seeds originate from the same cannabis plant as marijuana, but contain very low levels of THC—the psychoactive chemical responsible for the marijuana high.

Instead, hemp seeds are a great source of essential nutrients such as protein and fiber, which help balance blood sugar levels to maintain healthy cognitive function.

6. Avocado

You’re likely starting to see the pattern here: the foods highest in essential fatty acids and antioxidants are the best foods to eat to boost your brainpower. So, it’s no surprise that avocado, one of the richest sources of essential fatty acids and vitamin E, made the list.

Avocados contain a compound called choline, which is a precursor to the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine. Acetylcholine, which helps control nerve and memory function, makes up part of our central nervous system.

7. Grass-Fed Beef

Grass-fed meat is a main component of the Paleo diet because it’s significantly higher in nutrients and lower in toxins than factory-farmed meat (plus, many agree it tastes better). This is because a grass-fed diet provides animals with EPA and DHA, two omega-3 essential fatty acids, while a corn and grain diet does not.

Furthermore, grass-fed beef is one of the best sources of CLA, or conjugated linoleic acid, which has also been shown to improve brain function.

While all varieties of grass-fed meat will contain omega-3 essential fatty acids that help boost brain function, grass-fed beef is a particularly beneficial as a brain food because it’s also rich in iron. Iron helps transport oxygen-rich blood to your brain, which is absolutely critical for cognitive function.

8. Egg Yolks

Egg yolks are a rich source of choline, a nutrient that’s often grouped with B vitamins. Choline is one of the most important nutrients for brain function because it’s a precursor to acetylcholine. And as mentioned above, acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that regulates cognitive function.

In fact, low levels of choline have been linked to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. So if you only eat the egg whites, do your brain a favor and eat the yolk.

9. Coconut Oil

Coconut oil’s role in brain function has most recently been studied for reducing symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. While there’s limited research, it’s suggested that the medium chain triglycerides (MCT’s) found in coconut oil are responsible for improving cognitive function.

As a stable saturated fat, coconut oil is safe to cook with at high temperatures. It can also be used as a replacement to butter or shortening in baking recipes.

If you drink coffee, you may enjoy adding 1 tablespoon of coconut oil to your coffee, which promotes cognitive function and all-day energy without the caffeine crash. (You can learn more about how to make your coffee healthier right here.)

Watch this video – 10 Best Brain Foods to Sharpen Your Memory and Focus

Bottom Line

As you can see, with the absence of refined sugar and gluten, and an abundance of brain-boosting foods such healthy fats and antioxidants, adopting a Paleo diet is one of the best ways to naturally boost your cognitive function.

And not only does improving your cognitive health with essential nutrients reduce your risk of neurodegenerative diseases, but it also provides you with increased mental stamina to create more success and fulfillment in your life.

Written by Brandi Black

Author Bio:

Brandi Black is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and the creator of Feel Best Naked, a health blog for women who want to clear up their skin, lose the muffin top and make the bloat disappear. After years of experiencing (and then healing) her own unbalanced hormones, she’s now obsessed with helping other women feel spectacular in their own skin with natural remedies for hormone balance.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

Here’s 11 Gluten-Free Tips That Will Make You Healthier


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

One huge part of the Paleo lifestyle is to go gluten-free. There are several reasons you might want to go gluten-free, especially if you have Celiac disease or are gluten intolerant.

Wheat (and other gluten grains) can cause leaky gut syndrome, is inflammatory, is hard to digest, and when refined, offers very little nutrition. Many people might be allergic or intolerant to gluten and don’t even know it.

One of the best ways to find out if you have a problem with gluten is to cut it from your diet for at least 30 days and re-introduce it to watch for symptoms.

About Gluten

Gluten is the protein in grains that make it chewy and stretchy. It’s also added to processed foods as a thickening agent and is commonly used in meat substitutes.

How to Go Gluten-Free

Don’t be scared or overwhelmed; while gluten does appear in a lot of different foods, it’s not impossible to avoid. If you go Paleo, it’s even easier, because gluten is found in processed foods. As we know, one of the main “no” foods with Paleo is anything in the processed food category.


Gluten-Free Tips to Make It Easier

There are some ways to make it easier on yourself to go gluten-free. It doesn’t have to be overwhelming! There are a lot of foods you can eat and you’re not going to live a life of deprivation if you give up gluten. Here are some ways to make your lifestyle change a positive one.

Learn What You Have To Avoid

First off, you won’t be successful if you don’t know what you’re supposed to avoid. Things you can’t eat include anything with wheat, barley, rye, and anything made from those grains. Obviously, “gluten” is not allowable.

If you’re Celiac, you’ll also have to avoid using utensils or other kitchen equipment that comes in contact with gluten-containing foods. There are also grains that have a high risk of cross-contamination.

Here’s a list of things to avoid:

  • Bran
  • Wheat bran/starch/germ
  • Orzo
  • Panko
  • Seltan
  • Udon
  • Wheat
  • Barley
  • Barley extract or malt
  • Couscous
  • Faro
  • Kamut
  • Spelt
  • Triticale
  • Semolina
  • Durum
  • Malt (and malt vinegar)
  • Matzo meal or flour
  • Seitan
  • Farina
  • Rye
  • Beer, lager, or ale
  • Anything cooked in beer
  • Ramen noodles
  • Most sauces (check the label)
  • Most soy sauce (again, check the label)
  • Instant soups or gravies
  • Chocolate and chocolate chips
  • Puddings
  • Ice cream
  • Instant coffees

Enjoy the Foods You Can Eat

Don’t be sad about the foods you can’t eat; celebrate the ones you can! Besides all the whole, real foods out there to enjoy, there are also a lot of gluten-free options available these days. Sure, you’ll pay more for them, but if you really want a sandwich or a cookie, you do have options that don’t include gluten.

Read Labels!

This is probably one of the most important tips for going gluten-free. The sneaky protein hides in a lot of places you might not expect, so be sure to read all labels. Know which items contain gluten (see the list above for help) and avoid those foods that contain any of those ingredients.

Learn Which Takeout Is Gluten-Free

If you eat a lot of takeout, you’ll likely have to change your habits. Anything fried (Japanese, Chinese, or Southern fried chicken) is out but there are options that don’t include wheat.

A lot of the options on Indian menus are gluten-free since they don’t use pasta, and yogurt is commonly used as a thickener. Ask the restaurant to be sure, though. Some of the breads are even made from chickpea flour rather than wheat.

This “6 Tips for Staying Paleo When at Restaurants” guide is really helpful for when you’re just beginning your Paleo journey.

Eat More Produce

You’ll never have to worry about gluten when you eat fruits and vegetables! Just remember: corn is a grain, is often GMO, and might be cross-contaminated. You’re better off to avoid it altogether. You’ll also enjoy a host of other benefits when you increase your fruit and vegetable intake; they’re chock-full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Make Your Own Sauces and Dressings

Most bottled salad dressings and pre-packaged gravies, dips, and sauces contain gluten since it’s a commonly-used thickener. Besides allowing you to avoid gluten, if you make your own, they’ll taste better and be healthier. Most of these items contain soybean oil, unnecessary sugar, and preservatives.

Don’t worry, most sauces and dressings, like this Paleo Caesar Salad Dressing, are really easy to make.

Try Out Quinoa

You can use quinoa a lot like oats or couscous. It’s not a grain; it’s actually a seed. It has tons of protein and fiber and absorbs flavors from other ingredients.

Enjoy Rice

You can get rice in many different varieties: jasmine, brown, basmati, white, and more. It’s fairly inexpensive, cooks up easily, and can also be used in gluten-free pasta options.

Use Tamari Instead Of Soy Sauce

If you can’t find gluten-free soy sauce, and still want to eat your sushi (who wouldn’t?), then you can try out tamari. It’s actually a type of soy sauce and it’s usually wheat free. Look for it at bigger grocery stores or Asian supermarkets.

Get Yourself a Bread Machine

If you can’t give up bread, and don’t want to spend an arm and a leg on store-bought gluten-free loaves, now’s the time to learn to make your own. Get a bread machine and try out some recipes.

If you’d rather, you can even make bread in your oven with bread pans. There are some fantastic recipes out there like this bread made from coconut flour.

Be Kind to Yourself

Unless you’re Celiac, it’s not a matter of life or death for you to be 100 percent successful in cutting out gluten all at once. If you need to, cut it out a bit at a time until you’re entirely gluten-free.

Don’t feel bad about transitioning to gluten-free options if you don’t want to cut out bread and baked goods entirely. Just be proud of yourself for taking this step.

Watch this video – How To Enjoy A Healthy Gluten-Free Diet

Written by The PaleoHacks Team

Author Bio:

PaleoHacks is an online paleo diet community that promotes a healthy lifestyles through primal methods. PaleoHacks started as a way for people share recipes, ideas and general opinions about the Paleolithic lifestyle. Now, whether it be the paleo diet, physical fitness or overall wellness, PaleoHacks has evolved into an online resource for healthy living. check us out on Facebook.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

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