What to Do If You Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

When It’s More Than “Just Tired” – 8 Signs You Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

If you’re sleeping all day and still not feeling rested, it might be chronic fatigue syndrome. Here are a few tell-tale signs of CFS and how to naturally ease symptoms.

If you feel just as tired when you wake up after sleeping a whole night, you could be dealing with chronic fatigue syndrome. Most people with CFS appear to be healthy, and because there is no single lab test to check for the disease, chronic fatigue syndrome took a long time to be recognized as a legitimate disorder.

This relatively new diagnosis involves a weakened immune system, brain fog and worsened symptoms while standing upright. Here’s what it means to have chronic fatigue syndrome, and what you need to know to get the right care from yourself and your health practitioners.

What Is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as CFS, is a condition where fatigue is experienced so relentlessly that it doesn’t go away with rest and has no other medical explanation.

Fatigue can come on gradually over time or it can suddenly get worse. Either way, the intense level of tiredness is often alarming, and warrants a trip to the doctor. This leads to a battery of tests from doctors that will most often come back as “normal,” leaving the fatigue problem unanswered.

It is estimated that between 836,000 and 2.5 million Americans have chronic fatigue syndrome, but that as many as 91 percent haven’t been diagnosed yet. It can affect anyone of any age, but is commonly seen in women in their 40s and 50s.

8 Symptoms of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Symptoms of CFS can differ among people with the condition, but there are eight recognized core symptoms.

Fatigue

In order for fatigue to be considered strong enough for a CFS diagnosis, it has to be present for a minimum of six months and severe enough that rest doesn’t improve it. Doctors also look for at least three or four other symptoms on this list.

Tiredness After Physical Activity

Post-exertional malaise, or PEM, happens when physical activity or mental stressors that one used to tolerate now worsen fatigue to a level of being unable to function.

Unrefreshing Sleep

With all of the fatigue and PEM, many people with CFS often sleep and sleep for many hours. Unfortunately, a key symptom of CFS is unrefreshing sleep, where even eight or more hours do not improve the physical and mental feelings of fatigue.

Cognitive Impairment

People with CFS are both physically and mentally tired. CFS slows the brain’s ability to process information and can result in memory problems, attention disorders, and brain fog.

Worsened Symptoms While Standing

Also known as orthostatic intolerance, symptoms of CFS worsen when someone is standing or sitting upright, versus reclining or lying down.

Headaches and Body Pain

While pain associated with CFS is less specific than fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis, people with CFS tend to experience headaches or general body aches that can come and go frequently.

Frequent Illnesses

Those with CFS have weak immune systems, which result in more frequent, and sometimes more severe, illnesses.

Infection

Epstein-Barr is a virus frequently seen in people who have thyroid disease or disorders, and it’s been noted that it can also appear in people with CFS.

Other symptoms not necessary for diagnosis, but which might be found in people with CFS, are:

Insomnia

Sore throat

Swollen lymph nodes

Gastrointestinal problems

Sensitivity to food, drugs or chemicals

Causes of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic fatigue syndrome isn’t caused by one single thing, but a collection of many factors that result in impaired energy levels. Main theories on CFS triggers include:

Is Your Thyroid to Blame?

Most doctors assess thyroid health with a single thyroid stimulating hormone (or TSH) lab test for patients complaining of fatigue. If this test comes back in the normal range, you’ll likely be told that your thyroid is healthy and sent on your way.

However, research shows that a thyroid issue referred to as “low T3 syndrome” is often tied to CFS. It is also associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and chronic kidney disease. In low T3 syndrome, TSH appears normal and can cause doctors to ignore other thyroid lab tests.

How to Get a Proper Diagnosis?

How do you know if you have true CFS or just an underlying thyroid condition – or both?

If you meet all the diagnostic criteria for CFS, then you are dealing with a real case of chronic fatigue. But for most people, they want to know what caused it to start in the first place. This is when you should seek out a thyroid trigger.

Since low levels of the thyroid hormones T3 and T4 can be a contributing factor to debilitating fatigue, getting the right thyroid labs tests is a crucial first step.

Test Free T3 and Free T4 to assess how much thyroid hormone your body has available for use.

TSH is a meaningless test when it comes to ruling out thyroid-related issues with CFS because in most cases, TSH will appear normal, which is how a thyroid condition gets overlooked in the first place.

Ways to Live with CFS

Chronic fatigue syndrome can’t be cured, but it can go into remission. There are some natural ways to help alleviate the life-altering fatigue of CFS.

Limit Inflammatory Stimulants

Coffee and other stimulants won’t offset your fatigue with CFS and can instead increase inflammation within the body. Eliminate or strictly limit caffeine, sugar, and alcohol as much as possible.

Limit Sleep Time

Even though you may only want to sleep, sleeping 12 or more hours per day can worsen inflammation and contribute to other hormone imbalances. Skip naps and limit your sleep to 10 hours max per night.

Avoid Overexertion

Knowing your limits is vital for CFS, because pushing yourself will only intensify your fatigue. Don’t overdo any form of physical or mental exertion.

Try Acupuncture and Yoga

These holistic practices can be helpful in alleviating the pain associated with CFS. Work these into your regular routine for natural relief from pain, fatigue and other symptoms.

Watch this video – What to Do If You Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

Bottom Line

Chronic fatigue syndrome is still a relatively “new” medical condition and is not yet fully understood. While there is no current cure, CFS can go into remission, and symptoms can be alleviated naturally.

If you have CFS, make sure you’re working with a physician who understands the latest research on this chronic disorder.

Written by Aimee McNew

Author Bio:

Aimee McNew is a Certified Nutritionist who specializes in women’s health, thyroid problems, infertility, and digestive wellness. She ate her way back to health using a Paleo diet, lost 80 pounds, and had a healthy baby after numerous miscarriages. She focuses on simple nutrition practices that promote long-lasting results.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

The Science-Proven Secrets to a Happy and Lasting Marriage


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Science Says That This Is Crucial to a Lasting Marriage

With all of the varieties of personalities and unique tastes in a partnership it seems that finding one secret to a lasting marriage may be an eluding chase.

Can anyone really know for sure what will guarantee a happy marriage? Life is dynamic, minds change, and after all, there is free will. However, a recent study is suggesting that there might be a reoccurring ingredient in the happiest of marriages.

Probably more important than information is experience. After all, it is experiences and what we learn from them that make the expert. I once heard a well-informed man say that a wise man is worth a thousand knowledgeable books.

That being said, if you are reading this in hopes to gain a bit of insight on the subject of marriage, then who better to get advice from other than an experienced and happily married couple?

What Experts Have to Say

While of course, the success of each marriage is going to be subjective to those individuals, science has done some research and inquired with 468 married individuals about their marriages.

The results indicated that above all else, a shared expression of gratitude and appreciation was the most significant quality of a happy and lasting marriage.

Couples expressed that gratitude serves as a buffer during arguments and lessens the likelihood of withdrawing from their partner.

The study from the University of Georgia discovered that the greater the expressions were, the less prone the couples were to the negative effects of poor communication, disagreement and conflict.

Couples expressed that gratitude serves as a buffer during arguments and lessens the likelihood of withdrawing from their partner. It appears that when it comes to communication, it is better to say something rather than nothing, and even better if words of appreciation are expressed.

Appreciate Everything, Expect Nothing

Expectation is the killer of appreciation. Results from the previously mentioned study also found that couples who engaged in demanding or critical communication led to withdrawal and avoidance. Expressions of gratitude, on the other hand, tend to interrupt demanding communication.

What we focus on grows – if we are focused on the good and the appreciated aspects of our partners and union, then we will find them to grow, and our expectations for more to lessen. From this place, it’s often much easier to communicate.

Cultivating an Attitude of Gratitude

So if gratitude is a key to a lasting marriage, how do we cultivate a grateful heart? While it’s all too easy to focus on what we lack, the real secret to developing gratitude is to get a handle on our ability to direct our focus.

 It’s quite simple but sometimes the simple doesn’t always imply easy – it takes practice. Here are a few ways to shift focus to gratitude mode:

1. Keep a Gratitude Journal

Establishing a daily journaling practice is something most great thinkers have done. It’s therapeutic on many levels, and something that has personally helped me in many ways.

A journaling practice in and of itself is meditative and cultivates awareness and a clear mind for clearer communication and presence with your partner. It also is wonderful for setting the pace of your day in a pleasant manner.

By focusing on what we admire, adore and appreciate in our lives, we feel more capable of giving. Often in a relationship quarrel, it’s a battle of two people trying to receive something.

However, when we are in our highest state, we are more concerned with giving to others and our loved ones. A gratitude journal can help remind us that we have plenty to give.

For best results, set aside 10 minutes on a daily basis to recollect some of your best moments and anything you can think of for which you are grateful.

Take it a step further and write a detailed list of the reasons you are grateful for your partner and why. Soon you will find a viable life theme of gratefulness.

2. Use Perspective

Often, we are not grateful until it becomes necessary; we’re broke, sick or hungry, and our only option to keep in good spirits is to be thankful.

It is easy to be grateful when things are going well. However, it’s helpful to recall the hard times, and set up an unambiguous contrast in your mind, to see how truly blessed we often are.

Think back to the arguments, financial struggles or stress you and your partner once experienced. If you’re here now, that means you survived it and probably grew. If you can do it once, you can do it again, so be thankful for those opportunities for growth.

3. Count Your Blessings

It’s difficult to stay grateful when we are constantly growing. Growth is an innate function of the human spirit. This can make it easy to forget about the good things we have in our lives, though.

In order to counteract this mindset, consider these questions on a daily basis (you may even work them you’re your newfound journaling practice):

“What have I received from my partner?”
“What have I given to my partner?”
“What troubles and difficulty have I caused my partner?”

Observe these answers as a loving, objective viewer. Do not criticize; rather, see them for what they are, learn what you must, then make a choice to grow in the direction of gratitude and giving.

More Tips for A Happy Marriage

Among the many components of a healthy and lasting marriage, there are a few other recurring qualities that show up. Often times, when long-married duos are asked for their tips to success, a few additional qualities show up:

1. Patience

When it comes to a marriage (or any relationship), the individual comes before the group. Patience is a virtue for those who practice.

Life, especially married life, provides plenty of opportunities to practice patience.

Giving space for your partner to calm down, teaching a child a skill, or taking the time to listen and understand your partner’s viewpoint are all prime conditions for cultivating this beautiful quality.

As we develop patience in ourselves, we are able to bring it into our relationships.

After all, we can only give what we have. Practice patience every chance you get, as learning to be patient at work will better equip us to be patient at home with our partners. It takes time to truly get to know someone, and the better we feel understood and understand our partners, the happier we will be.

2. Seeing

So often we view the world and our partners through our own personal lens. We all have our personal tastes and interests. There’s nothing wrong with that, it makes life dynamic and interesting – if we all had the same taste, there would be no variety in life.

However, we also need to know when to take our lens down and simply see our partner for who they are, as they are. It’s lovely to see your partner as a lover, a wife/husband, and a partner when it comes to marriage. It’s also wonderful to see them for their true selves – a creative and spiritual being with infinite potential.

When a marriage runs into rough patches, the highest solution is to bend – to become flexible. So often our lenses see life in a very rigid manner, and we cut ourselves off from seeing. Take your marital challenges as an opportunity to grow and expand your view of the world.

3. Ask

It’s often easier for us to assume things than it is to find out. We tend to assume what our partner is thinking and feeling.

Sometimes, we go so far as to assume we know how they want to be treated and what’s best for them. The truth is, everything in life is subjective and up to the individual. One of the best things we could ever do in a relationship, especially when in it for the long haul, is to ask questions.

It takes courage to ask questions and hear the truth. Instead of assuming that you know your partner, ask.

What are their best characteristics in their eyes? What makes them happy? What is their mission in life, their purpose? What do they want to produce in life? What do they intend to receive in a marriage? What do they intend to give? How do they want to be treated?

The happiest couples are the couples that know each other. They know how to love, how to care, and how to communicate. Asking questions and listening builds trust and reliability.

And if a marriage is a partnership, then reliability is a must. Nobody wants an unreliable partner. So discover what you do not know and inquire with your partner.

Watch this video – Secrets To A Happy Marriage | Michael McIntyre SHOWTIME | Universal Comedy

Want some more tips to a lasting marriage? Go and read – 100 Tips for a Happy Long Lived Marriage

Written by Nick Kowalski

Author Bio:

Nick Kowalski is a Transformational Coach, fitness model and unconditional lover. You can find more of his writing on his blog NicksFit. His mission is to inspire the transformation toward love consciousness. Follow him on Instagram for more living in love inspiration and transformational mindset motivation!

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

5 Dietary and Lifestyle Factors That May Help Depression


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

The Inflammation-Depression Connection – Habits & How to Eat for Better Mental Health

Depression isn’t always a mental disorder on its own. Research reveals that the inflammation-depression connection is real, and increased inflammation truly has a big impact on our brain health.

Depression impacts more than 15 million adults every year. Treatments range from medicated antidepressants to counselling or therapy to doing nothing at all. While almost everyone can have short periods of feeling blue, major depressive episodes are classed as lasting two weeks or longer, with dysthymia (depression lasting for two years or longer) being a prolonged episode of a more serious nature.

Depression is somewhat common, but to the person suffering from it, it doesn’t feel common or normal at all. It can feel life-altering, debilitating, and never ending.

What Is Depression?

Depression (also clinically referred to as major depressive disorder) is a common and serious medical condition that has a profound impact on the way a person thinks, feels, and acts.

Depression includes feelings of sadness, loss of interest in activities that used to bring joy, and a lack of feeling altogether.

Depression can be life-altering in that it can reduce a person’s ability to function in daily life, in work, and in relationships, and it can also make it difficult to have the energy or motivation to work toward treating or reversing the condition.

Depression is treatable for most people, but since it can also be associated with other chronic conditions or diseases, it can sometimes be misdiagnosed or can be difficult to treat alongside other disorders.

For example, thyroid problems, hormone imbalances, and chronic pain conditions can be misdiagnosed as depression. Sometimes thyroid problems or hormone imbalances are misdiagnosed as depression.

Women are more likely to experience depression than men, and depression can first make its appearance anywhere from the late teens to early thirties.

Depression is distinctly different from periods of sadness, bereavement, or grief, although depression can follow after those periods of time. Self-esteem and self-kindness can often decline in people suffering from depression, and self-loathing can often become a frequent feeling.

While depression can affect anyone, there are several factors that can be indicators of a predisposition to or trigger for depression.

They can include:

  • Genetics: Certain genetic mutations can affect how certain chemicals work in the brain, particularly serotonin and dopamine.  Depression has a tendency to run in families for this reason.
  • Environmental factors: People exposed to poor treatment, poor work environments, or abuse can develop depression. Traumatic experiences can also trigger depressive episodes.
  • Pregnancy: Postpartum depression can affect as many as 20 percent of women who give birth. In some cases, this can turn into a propensity for major depressive disorder even after postpartum depression has resolved.

Bottom line: Depression is a common mental disorder that can be disruptive and debilitating. Although depression is treatable, since it can be associated with other chronic conditions or diseases, it can sometimes be misdiagnosed or can be difficult to treat alongside other disorders.

How Are Depression and Inflammation Linked?

Recent research indicates that depression isn’t just a mood disorder, but is a condition that is linked with inflammation, specifically in the gut. Gram negative bacteria, or “bad” bacteria in the gut, can increase immune responses, leading to inflammation and a role in the development of clinical depression.

Leaky gut, or increased intestinal permeability, can allow these gram negative bacteria to enter the bloodstream and systemic circulation, perpetuating the ongoing inflammation-depression cycle.

Research continues to illustrate the importance of addressing gut health in depression and stress-related disorders.

Individuals with clinical depression have been shown to have specific biomarkers that are associated with inflammation versus people who are not depressed. This is true even for those who are otherwise physically healthy, and not just individuals who have pre-existing inflammatory conditions.

Depression is a highly chronic disorder that can have flare-ups or recurrences, much like other inflammatory disorders (like rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or autoimmune thyroid disease).

The more episodes that a patient has, the more prone they will be to continued and future episodes unless, of course, the inflammation is addressed at the root and multiple lifestyle, dietary, and potentially prescription methods are utilized.

Bottom line: Depression is closely tied to inflammation, and isn’t always a mental disorder on its own. Gut health is closely tied to mental health because a large portion of the enteric nervous system is located in the gut, perpetuating the inflammation-depression connection.

Inflammation, Leaky Gut, and Diet

Leaky gut syndrome is a condition where the small intestine’s tight junctions become loose. The tight junctions should serve as regulated gateways to prevent unauthorized particles from entering the bloodstream.

However, when they become damaged from exposure to food allergies, sensitivities, chemicals, or toxins, they start allowing dangerous particles to enter into systemic circulation. This can result in autoimmune attacks, increased inflammation, and new food allergies or sensitivity reactions.

Certain dietary factors can exacerbate leaky gut and, ultimately, the inflammation-depression connection. These can include:

  • Gluten and grains
  • Soy and legumes
  • Dairy products
  • Trans fats and vegetable oils
  • Refined sugars
  • Processed foods
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine

Addressing leaky gut comes down to removing offending foods, toxins, and other lifestyle factors (like smoking) and supporting the body with foods and nutrients that will help the intestinal wall to heal.

Foods and nutrients that are beneficial for leaky gut include:

  • Bone broth and the nutrients it contains (collagen, glycine, glutamine, glucosamine)
  • Cruciferous vegetables
  • Leafy greens
  • Antioxidant fruits like berries
  • Pastured proteins
  • Wild-caught seafood
  • Healthy fats like avocado and coconut oil

5 Dietary and Lifestyle Factors That May Help Depression

Beyond addressing leaky gut, there are several other lifestyle factors which can help reduce symptoms of depression.

Move Daily

Regular exercise can help to improve depression in many people. Not coincidentally, exercise also helps to reduce inflammation.

Yoga is extremely helpful for combating depression and inflammation, and a regular yoga practice – even at home and just for a few minutes a day – can be a positive step in the right direction.

Walking alone or in a group is also a good exercise that can address depression in a proactive way, and the distance or speed isn’t as important as the regularity.

Practice Healthy Sleep Habits

Healthy sleep habits, including enough sleep, can also dramatically improve inflammatory conditions and depression. While not everyone needs eight hours a night, it’s a good goal to start with.

Not getting enough sleep, even when every other lifestyle factor is on point, can have a damaging effect on overall inflammation levels. Sleep deprivation can directly increase inflammation levels.

Insomnia can be a side effect of inflammatory conditions, but even in the presence of sleep disruptions, it’s helpful to set a regular bedtime habit that can eventually help to train the brain to go to sleep at a consistent time each day.

Skip the Alcohol

It can be a natural instinct to turn to alcohol when needing to unwind, relax, or turn off a brain that is overworked and run down. But when depression is present, it’s also important to avoid alcohol, which has a depressive effect on the body.

Switch to Decaf

Caffeine, as a stimulant, can temporarily improve symptoms, but in the long-term, perpetuates a depressive cycle. Those suffering from depression can often feel tired and unmotivated, so getting some pep from a cup of coffee or other caffeine seems like a good solution. It may work in the very short-term, but overall, will perpetuate a cycle of inflammation and adrenal stress that will prolong or worsen depression.

Quit Sugar

Avoidance of sugar is also beneficial for a depression wellness plan since sugar increases the inflammatory response within the body, and can also wreak havoc on leaky gut and digestive issues.

It’s easy to avoid sugar when you reduce processed and refined foods from your diet, and choose instead whole foods, particularly healthy meats, fats, and vegetables.

Watch this video – Effect of Diet and Lifestyle Changes in Depression by Prof Michael Berk

Bottom line: With a proper diagnosis and an anti-inflammatory care plan from a qualified professional, the majority of people who suffer from depression will find relief and remission.

In some cases, admitting that depression is a problem is the biggest hurdle, but depression can impact anyone, and there is no shame in dealing with it.

In the same way that other inflammatory conditions can happen as a result of genetics or life situations outside of your control, so can depression, too. Seeking professional for inflammation-depression help can lessen the severity and provide relief.

Written by Aimee McNew

Author Bio:

Aimee McNew is a Certified Nutritionist who specializes in women’s health, thyroid problems, infertility, and digestive wellness. She ate her way back to health using a Paleo diet, lost 80 pounds, and had a healthy baby after numerous miscarriages. She focuses on simple nutrition practices that promote long-lasting results.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

What is the Best Natural Cure for High Blood Pressure?


Click HERE to Discover How You Can Maintain & Stabilize Your Blood Pressure Naturally

Natural Cure for High Blood Pressure Discovered (new study)

The traditional medical system has no solution for high blood pressure other than dangerous drugs, sometimes carrying lethal side effects.

But researchers from the University of Houston’s College of Pharmacy recently discovered a simple, natural cure for high blood pressure.

It’s more effective than drugs and it comes with no side effects.

You already have the cure in your kitchen, and you’re consuming it on a daily basis.

You may just need to boost it up a little to watch your blood pressure numbers drop.

The kidneys play a key role in managing blood pressure. Depending on orders from the brain, they excrete more sodium to lower blood pressure or excrete less sodium to raise blood pressure.

But for some reason, the kidneys do not always manage to do their job.

One of the most common classes of blood pressure drug, diuretics (also called a water pill), is supposed to help the kidneys get rid of excess water and sodium. But they come with serious side effects.

However, what the researchers discovered was that when oxidized stress (free radicals that cause inflammation) occurs in the kidneys, dopamine receptors that are supposed to monitor sodium excretion cannot function properly.

By loading your body with antioxidants, which fight free radicals, the oxidized stress is reduced, and your kidneys can do their job again.

The good news is that this is easy to do. using delicious fruits and vegetables without the side effects of water pills.

Blueberries have more varieties of antioxidants than any other fruit. But antioxidants can be found in all fruits and vegetables. The general rule is the more color, the better. You can also take them as supplements.

It’s equally important to avoid oxidization in the first place, by eating healthy foods and avoid everything processed. Food cooked at very high temperatures (grilled)—and of course fried foods—also contribute to oxidization.

The real underlying cause, however, lies in the phrase “oxidized stress.” Because any stress can be the underlying cause of high blood pressure. It can be physical (oxidization, diseases), mental (long-lasting difficult tasks at work), emotional (loss of a loved one), or sensory (traffic, loud TV).

And the stress accumulates. Imagine having the flu (physical stress) while there is loud construction going on next door (sensory stress). In that case, your stress level and blood pressure would rise more than it would from just one of those factors alone.

When your body is under oxidized or any other stress for a long time, your brain gets into the habit of triggering high blood pressure. This becomes chronic, habitual. So even if the stress factors are no longer present, your blood pressure stays high.

The way to deal with this is to break “the habit of high blood pressure.” You can do this by giving yourself “a Focused Break.” It only takes a few minutes, but you’ll immediately experience a drop in blood pressure.

But the Focused Break is a topic for another article. Learn more about how the Focused Break exercises work to lower blood pressure, and try them out for yourself here…

If your cholesterol is too high, it’s probably because of oxidized cholesterol buildup in your arteries. Here is how to get rid of that plaque buildup quickly…

Natural Cure for High Blood Pressure – This Healthy Food Raises Blood Pressure and Doubles Heart Attack Risk

As a health-conscious reader of Blue Heron Health News, I’m sure you pay a lot of attention to what you eat and try to choose a healthy diet.

But sometimes, not all is as it seems.

According to a new study, some healthy foods, such as common fruits and vegetables, could turn lethal if used in the wrong way. And we all use them in this way from time to time.

According to a new study from the Environmental Health Center at Seoul National University College of Medicine in Korea, consuming fruits, vegetables, and other foods from cans can double your risk of heart attack.

This only applies to cans lined with bisphenol A (BPA). Unfortunately, most food cans are still lined with this dangerous chemical, even though it’s been proven to cause many serious diseases.

Most plastic containers are also high in BPA.

The only safe way to avoid it is to only use cans, bottles, or other contains that are clearly marked as BPA-free.

In spite of the overwhelming evidence from this and other studies, the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) still argues that BPA is completely safe.

The Korean researchers recruited 60 men and women to drink either three cans lined with BPA or 3 glass bottles of soy milk per day. Those who drank out of cans had a five-point rise in blood pressure on average, compared to the glass-drinking group.

The researchers also found a scary 1,600% (yes—one thousand, six hundred percent) increase in BPA in the urine of the can group compared to the glass group.

A spike in blood pressure drastically increases the risk of heart attack. So if you consume a higher volume of BPA, it can easily double your heart attack risk.

With high blood pressure being so serious, it’s extremely important to lower it. The best way I know to lower blood pressure naturally is to use three easy exercises. Try these exercises out for yourself here…

High levels of bad cholesterol are another factor behind stroke and heart attack. But not in the way that most doctors think. Here is the step-by-step strategy I used to clear my 93% blocked heart arteries and avoid a heart attack…

Natural Cure for High Blood Pressure – 80% of High Blood Pressure Cases Caused by This Single Thing

One challenge in treating high blood pressure is that there seem to be so many factors that affect this disease.

A bad diet, lack of exercise, high cholesterol, and obesity are just a few examples of the hundreds of things considered to cause high blood pressure.

But researchers from Australia recently discovered a single factor that is behind 80% of high blood pressure cases. The best thing is, it’s easy to tackle this underlying cause and permanently get rid of high blood pressure.

In a new study published in the journal Cell, the researchers tested the effects of leptin on high blood pressure. Leptin is a hormone that, among other things, regulates appetite, metabolism, and body fat storage.

More body fat causes more leptin to circulate in the bloodstream. The researchers found that this tends to increase blood pressure. This is one reason that obesity and high blood pressure so often go hand in hand.

These scientists claim that high leptin levels may be the cause of up to 80% of all high blood pressure cases.

But that’s not the end of the story, because not everyone who has high blood pressure is obese, and vice versa.

The researchers took a group of obese mice with high blood pressure and disabled the receptors in their brains that process leptin. Like magic, the blood pressures of the obese mice went down.

But mice are not humans. So next, the researchers hunted down a group of people who were obese, with high leptin levels. However, either genetically or because of a disease, these people’s brains didn’t process leptin as effectively as normal. Without exception, these people had normal blood pressures, despite obesity.

What about slim people, then? Maybe some people just have more sensitive leptin receptors in their brains. So even if they’re not obese and their leptin levels are normal, their brains still trigger an elevation in blood pressure.

But does this mean that the solution is to just tone down the leptin receptors in the brain (as the researchers indicated)?

No, that’s just another way to use drugs to unbalance your system. And these drugs will always come with serious side effects and mess up something else in the process.

When your brain is reacting to leptin, it is correctly saying that something is wrong.

Being obese puts extreme stress on your body. And a functional way to deal with any stress is to raise blood pressure.

If you’re not obese and still have high blood pressure, it means that your brain is reacting to some other kind of stress. And stress accumulates. Yes, forcing leptin down could lower blood pressure (because it’s one of many influences), but it doesn’t address the real underlying stress.

Only your brain regulates your blood pressure. It gets messages from your body and senses, which it processes to decide how high your blood pressure should be (did you get an unexpected expense, have your arteries narrowed, etc.) But, just like the CEO of a major corporation, your brain makes the final decision.

The problem is that your brain gets used to firing off high blood pressure orders. It becomes an unconscious habit. And just like other bad habits, this habit needs to be broken.

The method I use to break this “habit of high blood pressure” is something I call a Focused Break.

Throughout the years, thousands of clients have used these easy Focused Break exercises to successfully lower their blood pressure to a healthy level.

This is by far the easiest and most effective method I know to drop blood pressure permanently.

Watch this video – No Pills! Natural Cure for High Blood Pressure

Learn how the simple Focused Break exercises work, and try them out for yourself…

This post is from the High Blood Pressure Exercise Program. It was made by Christian Goodman Blue Heron health news that has been recognized as one of the top-quality national health information websites. 

This program will provide you the natural high blood pressure treatments, natural recipes to cook healthy meals and useful strategies to build a healthy diet with the aim to help you to maintain, stabilize and get your blood pressure down in minutes permanently and naturally.

To find out more about this program, click on Natural Cure for High Blood Pressure

Here are the 11 Natural Remedies to Calm Anxiety


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Anxiety – Symptoms, Causes & Natural Remedies

The pace of life seems to have accelerated over the past decade. Today, the constant stream of emails, never-ending social media updates, and blurring of the lines between work and home life are increasingly stressful on your body and brain.

In fact, our increasingly hectic schedules have paralleled a similarly alarming increase in the rates of anxiety in the general population over that time.

It’s becoming more and more common for people to experience anxiety in the workplace; a recent study found that up to 40% of workers today have reported high levels of anxiety in their jobs.

Today’s constant connectivity is terrific for driving productivity and innovation, but if you’re not mindful, it can start to negatively impact your health.

Anxiety disorders affect about 1 out of 5 adults in America, and 40% of people take some sort of mood altering medication from their doctor. The World Health Organization (WHO) predicts that by the year 2050, one-third of the global population will suffer from either anxiety or depression.

Let’s take a look at some typical signs of anxiety, after which we can look at some simple strategies to help curb these symptoms.

Anxiety Symptoms

When I see patients in clinic, many people are surprised to see that some (or many) of the symptoms of anxiety apply to them.

Common symptoms of mild to moderate anxiety can include:

  • Inability to focus
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Feelings of uneasiness
  • Quick breathing
  • Increase heart rate
  • Dry mouth
  • Cold or sweaty hands or feet

As your symptoms become more pronounced or if your anxiety is more longstanding, you may experience some of the following symptoms:

You can see from this list that symptoms of anxiety can be very general; it’s therefore easy for doctors to miss and many people may experience a few of these symptoms at some point in their lives.

If you notice these symptoms increasing in frequency or severity, then it’s time to think about actively incorporating strategies to address the root cause.

What Causes Anxiety?

There are number of things that can contribute to symptoms of anxiety, and one of the most common might be part of your regular morning routine. That’s right, caffeine is listed in the DSM-5 (the medical bible for mental health diagnoses used by the American Psychiatry Association) as a direct cause of anxiety, yet for many anxiety sufferers it continues to be part of their morning routine.

Food can also predispose you to bouts of anxiety. If you struggle with poor blood sugar control, when your levels bottom out you’ll be at a much greater risk of symptoms of anxiety.

The natural reaction when blood sugars are low is to look for a sugary snack, which shoots blood sugars way up and leaves you prone to constant “highs and lows”. Unstable blood sugar levels, caffeine and stress all contribute to anxiety.

Stress is another major cause of anxiety. Stress comes in many different forms: work, school, relationships, finances, alcohol and drugs, and even too much exposure to WIFI and mobile devices.

Reducing exposure to stressors under your control (caffeine, alcohol, recreational drugs, etc.) is the first place to start, thereby enabling you to improve your response to the stressors which are not in your control (i.e., your workload in school or at the office).

Your reaction to the stressors is the only thing you can truly control, and it plays a massive role in how well you cope with stress. If you struggle with anxiety, your sympathetic nervous system is likely too-ramped up in “fight or flight” mode (in which your brain and body think you’re running away from a tiger or lion), when in reality it’s simply too many emails or work deadlines to meet.

If you constantly react very strongly to stressors, you effectively program your nervous system to always “hyper-respond” to stress, which will lead to symptoms of anxiety.

The good news is you can reprogram your stress response and build better resilience, or capacity, to cope with stress. Reprogramming your nervous system with some gentle exercises or lifestyle “hacks” will help to reboot your overactive “fight or flight” nervous system.

11 Natural Remedies to Calm Anxiety

1. Remove (or Reduce) Caffeine

If you struggle with regular or severe bouts of anxiety, it’s time to kick coffee to the curb. Caffeine triggers the release of the stress hormone adrenaline, which can be beneficial for some, but disastrous in others if the caffeine dose is too much.

Moreover, if you’re genetically a “slow metabolizer” of caffeine, it will remain in your bloodstream for longer periods, which can worsen anxiety symptoms or inhibit deep sleep.

2. Lift Weights

Numerous studies have shown the clear benefit of resistance training for improving cognition, mood and anxiety. If you’re sedentary, you can start by performing bodyweight exercises at home, join a local gym or CrossFit box, or try a new class in your area.

3. Go for a Run

If lifting weight isn’t your thing, get moving and add more cardio to your daily routine.

Experts at the Anxiety and Depression Association of America have found that regular aerobic exercise can decrease overall levels of tension, balance mood, improve sleep, and increase self-esteem.

4. Turn Up the Music

When life gets busy, social outings and even listening to music often go by the wayside. Attending a live music concert, or even listening to relaxing music at home, have been shown to reduce anxiety levels. Turn off your TV and turn up your stereo to help decompress.

5. Get a Massage

Physical touch is an important and calming influence on the brain, yet when we get busy we often distance ourselves from friends and loved ones. Something as simple as going for a massage and receiving some therapeutic touch has been shown to be effective for decreasing an overactive sympathetic nervous system.

6. Do Yoga

If you can’t carve out time for a massage, relax your nervous system at home with some gentle stretching or yoga. Performing some basic poses for 10-15 minutes is a great way to turn off your “thinking” brain so your body can begin to relax, possibly helping to relieve symptoms of anxiety in some people.

7. Try Acupuncture

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has used acupuncture for millennia for treating anxiety and research, and there is support for its use as an effective anxiety aid.

Acupuncture helps to relax tight muscles, dampen a hyperactive nervous system, and provide an environment to disconnect from your work and life stressors.

8. Talk It Out

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a proven scientific talk therapy approach that uses problem solving techniques to reprogram your reaction to stressors. CBT is a great technique for getting to the root cause of your anxiety.

9. Take a Nature Walk

If you live a city, constant exposure to concrete, noise and pollution takes its toll on your body and mind.

A recent study found that rediscovering nature and going for a walk outdoors is naturally calming to the nervous system and can improve symptoms of anxiety. Find a local park or take a trip to the countryside near you.

10. Deep Breathing

Your breath is the connection between your body and mind. When life gets busy, you likely breathe up in your chest, and this “pump handle” type breathing is a sympathetic nervous system stimulator.

Carving out 5-10 minutes to take deep, belly breaths (using your diaphragm) activates the vagus nerve in your brain to tell your body “ahh, relax”. It’s a wonderful tonic for mild or severe anxiety.

11. Sing

There are many other ways to help calm your overactive sympathetic nervous system, and singing is at the top of the list. A recent study in choir members found a positive impact on psychological indicators of mood and anxiety. Try singing in the shower, in your car, or during your outdoor walks!

Our environment today is a major driver of symptoms of anxiety like restlessness, poor focus, insomnia and general feelings of uneasiness.

Help offset the stimulatory effects of today’s fast paced world on your nervous system by adding some of these simple strategies to your routine. Your health, productivity and happiness will all be rewarded.

Watch this video – 10 natural remedies for helping anxiety and stress

Written by Dr. Marc Bubbs

Author Bio:

Dr. Marc Bubbs, ND is a Naturopathic Doctor, Strength Coach, Author, Speaker, and Blogger practicing in Toronto, Canada. He believes that diet, exercise, and lifestyle factors have the most profound impact on your overall health and performance. Marc is the author of The Paleo Project – A 21st Guide to Looking Leaner, Getting Stronger, & Living Longer and currently serves as the Sports Nutrition Lead for Canadian Men’s Olympic Basketball Team.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

The 6 Best Supplements for Menopause, Proven by Research


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Combat hot flashes, mood swings, and night sweats with these six supplements that help ease menopause.

Menopause is a major transitional phase of intense hormonal shifts. Often, the discomfort of menopause leads women to find relief. Conventional medical treatment relies on synthetic hormones to bring balance to the body, but these can come with their own risks and side effects.

The good news is that there are many natural supplements that can provide relief without pesky or dangerous side effects.

Symptoms and Treatments of Menopause

Menopause marks the end of a woman’s fertility and often starts between the ages of 40 and 45. The transition into menopause is known as perimenopause and can last for five to 10 years.

Menopause is official when a woman has ceased to have a period for 12 consecutive months.

Symptoms of menopause can range from irritating to life-altering, with some women finding themselves unable to sleep or function well due to the severity.

Common symptoms include:

  • Night sweats
  • Hot flashes
  • Chills
  • Sleep problems
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Thinning hair
  • Dry skin
  • Weight gain
  • Slowed metabolism
  • Mood changes

Conventional treatment uses synthetic hormones designed to trick the body into thinking that it is still in its reproductive years. While they can often provide relief from these symptoms, many would argue that artificially altering a woman’s hormone state only masks the symptoms. Plus, these treatments often increase the risk of breast cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Other conventional treatment methods include prescriptions to address hot flashes, antidepressants, and vaginal estrogen to address dryness.

Menopause is a normal end to reproduction, and a healthy transition for women as they age – not a disease to be corrected. Even so, some women find that the transition symptoms can feel unbearable. Natural options are available to buffer the volume of symptoms, without added side effects or risks.

As always, never start supplements unless you’ve spoken with your doctor since they can affect individuals differently or interact with medications or health conditions.

6 Supplements to Help Ease Menopause

While no supplements are one-size-fits-all, these six research-backed supplements can help address the discomfort of menopause.

1. Black Cohosh

Black cohosh is effective for addressing hot flashes, which are commonly the number one complaint of menopausal women. It’s also beneficial for mood swings and improving bone markers.

Take black cohosh in capsule form, which is easier to take than the bitter herbal extract.

Who should avoid: Those with liver problems.


How to take: Daily for up to six months. Look for products that contain around 400 milligrams black cohosh root extract, like this one.

2. Kava Extract

Kava is a spice that can help relieve menopause-related anxiety. It also has the potential to improve hot flashes and depression, too.

You can take kava as a tea, but we recommend taking capsules to ensure a regular dose.

Who should avoid: Those with liver problems.


How to take: Daily for at least eight weeks and up to 3 months. Find a single-herb supplement with kava root extract, like this one.

3. St. John’s Wort

St. John’s Wort is a potent flowering plant long used for depression and mood balancing. For women in menopause or perimenopause, St. John’s Wort can be an effective treatment for symptoms like hot flashes. It may also improve sleep quality, reduce psychological symptoms, and increase quality of life overall.

Who should avoid: Those who experience poor responses to certain antidepressants, or who are already taking antidepressants. Only take St. John’s Wort under the supervision of a medical professional.


How to take: 400-900 mg/day for 3-4 months. Find a supplement that contains the flower buds and tops of St. John’s Wort, like this one.

4. Maca

Maca is an adaptogen herb hailing from South America that helps the body deal with stress. It’s often used to boost energy levels, and can also be helpful in addressing anxiety, depression, and sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women.

Maca is available as a powder, but we recommend taking supplement capsules to ensure a standardized intake.

Who should avoid: Pregnant or breastfeeding women, and any women with estrogen-based conditions like breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, and fibroids.


How to take: 1,000-2,000 mg/daily. Find a product that contains maca root, like this one.

5. Pycnogenol

A specific form of pine bark extract, Pycnogenol is a supplement that can help ease menopause symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, loss of libido, and vaginal dryness.

Only take Pycnogenol that is found in capsule form, as regular pine bark extract has not been studied for menopause.

Who should avoid: Don’t take if you are on medications for diabetes, immune-suppressants, anticoagulants, or antibiotics. You should also avoid if you’re allergic to pine.


How to take: 100-200 mg/day for at least 8 weeks and not more than one year consecutively. Find a product that contains pine bark extract, like this one.

6. Vitex

Also known as chaste tree berry, vitex is frequently used for PMS-related disorders, and can be beneficial for menopause, too. Most notably, vitex can help to alleviate hot flashes, emotional changes, and mood swings.

Vitex can be taken in liquid or capsule form – whichever you prefer!

Who should avoid: Be cautious when taking Vitex with antidepressants, medications for Parkinson’s, and any others that affect levels of dopamine or serotonin.


How to take: 160-240 mg/daily. Choose a liquid extract of chaste tree berry, like this one.

Watch this video – BEST Natural Supplements for Menopause (YOUR favorites for Weight Gain, Energy, Hot Flashes)

The Bottom Line

If you’re wary of traditional hormone replacement therapy to treat your menopause symptoms, try these six research-proven supplements for relief with fewer side effects.

Note, while some doctors might recommend using multiple supplements together, others may advise taking one of these at a time. To discover which protocol might be helpful for you, check in with your doctor for the best personalized advice.

Written by Aimee McNew

Author Bio:

Aimee McNew is a Certified Nutritionist who specializes in women’s health, thyroid problems, infertility, and digestive wellness. She ate her way back to health using a Paleo diet, lost 80 pounds, and had a healthy baby after numerous miscarriages. She focuses on simple nutrition practices that promote long-lasting results.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

7 Foods and Herbs That Can Heal PMS Naturally


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Eat more of these vitamins and herbs to stop the hormonal mood swings of PMS in its tracks.

As if periods aren’t inconvenient enough, it often comes along with the unfortunate side effects of premenstrual syndrome, or PMS. It’s estimated that over 90 percent of women get some form of PMS during each cycle.

You don’t have to wait for menopause to ease your PMS symptoms for good. These seven natural remedies can provide quick relief, while correcting the underlying hormonal imbalances that cause the issues in the first place.

Symptoms of PMS

PMS symptoms tend to kick in shortly after ovulation, around seven to 10 days before the period could be expected.

While PMS varies from woman to woman, and even from one cycle to the next, common symptoms include:

Common Causes of PMS

While there isn’t a single trigger for PMS, several key factors are involved. Here are a few:

Most women have a unique combination of factors leading to PMS symptoms, and addressing just one of them is probably not enough. Instead, correct the underlying hormone imbalances with supportive anti-inflammatory nutrients to relieve symptoms.

Seven Vitamins and Herbs That Balance PMS

Instead of reaching for a short-term pain reliever, try the following seven natural remedies. You’ll balance out the core causes of PMS for long-term relief from monthly hormonal woes.

As always, ask your doctor before starting any supplements to make sure it won’t interact with any medications.

1. Calcium

If you aren’t getting enough calcium in your diet, start with this important mineral. Research shows that supplementing with calcium can help reduce major PMS symptoms like fatigue, bloating, and mood swings.

Aim for 500 to 700 milligrams of calcium every day, but don’t take more than 1,000 milligrams. High amounts of calcium can increase your risk of kidney stones and heart attack.

You don’t need to eat dairy to get enough calcium in your diet. Try eating more of these Paleo calcium-rich foods:

  • 1 cup of collard greens = 360 mg
  • 3 oz of canned bone-in sardines = 325 mg
  • 1 cup of broccoli rabe = 200 mg
  • 3 oz of canned bone-in salmon = 180 mg
  • 1 cup of kale = 180 mg
  • 1 cup of bok choy = 160 mg
  • 2 dried figs = 65 mg
  • 1 cup of broccoli = 60 mg
  • 1 orange = 55 mg

If you choose to supplement, be sure to get an absorbable form like dicalcium malate.

2. Chaste Tree Berry

Chaste tree berry is an herbal supplement derived from dark purple berries of a shrub known as the vitex agnus-castus tree.

Research finds that chaste tree berry can help ease PMS symptoms like bloating, headaches, breast pain, sleep disturbances, mood disorders, and even cramping.

Regular use will increase your progesterone levels over time, counterbalancing the effects of estrogen dominance that can worsen PMS.

Choose a high-quality herbal extract supplement like this one, and aim for between 150 to 1,000 milligrams per day, for up to four months at a time.

3. Magnesium

It’s common for women with PMS to be low in this essential mineral. Magnesium helps promote muscle relaxation, sleep, and hormone balance.

Research from 2010 showed that magnesium, in combination with vitamin B6, helped reduce PMS symptoms like anxiety, depression, breast pain, and sleep problems.

The recommended daily amount for magnesium is 310 to 320 milligrams for women of reproductive age.

Try eating more of these magnesium-rich foods:

  • 1 ounce of almonds = 80 mg
  • ½ cup spinach = 78 mg
  • 1 ounce of cashews = 74 mg
  • 1 cup of avocado = 44 mg
  • 6 ounces of chicken breast = 44 mg
  • 1 banana = 32 mg

If you’d like to supplement, choose an absorbable form like magnesium citrate.

4. Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 is great for PMS relief. It helps produce neurotransmitters and hormones like progesterone, which balances the brain and relieves anxiety and depression. B6 also helps to reduce symptoms of excess estrogen and can reduce histamine levels – which are another underlying cause of PMS.

The recommended daily intake for B6 is 1.2 to 1.3 milligrams for women of reproductive age.

Try eating more of these foods that are naturally rich in B6:

  • Beef liver
  • Yellowfin tuna
  • Sockeye salmon
  • Chicken breast
  • Turkey
  • Bananas
  • Ground beef
  • Winter squash

If you eat at least six ounces per day of meat, you’re likely getting enough B6.

However, if you’re vegetarian or vegan, or you have genetic mutations that make absorbing and converting B6 into the active form, you might struggle to get enough through diet alone.

To supplement with B6, choose the active form known as P5P. Don’t take more than 50 milligrams per day, as over-supplementing can damage nerves.

5. Omega-3 Fats

Essential fatty acids, also known as omega-3 fats, fight the inflammation that can trigger PMS symptoms. Eating more of these healthy fats can naturally reduce breast pain, headaches, bloating, depression, anxiety, and brain fog.

The best sources of omega-3 fats are seafood like salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and herring.

Be aware that it’s not only about eating enough omega-3 fats but cutting down on omega-6 fatty acids as well. For example, eating too many nuts and seeds, which are high in omega-6 fatty acids, can affect your ratio and worsen symptoms.

If you’re not a fan of seafood, you can take a high-quality omega-3 supplement like this.

6. Rhodiola

Rhodiola is an adaptogen herb that helps the body cope with hormonal imbalances. It’s also great for reducing the fatigue often associated with PMS.

Adaptogenic herbs help the body to better deal with stress. One study found that Rhodiola can reduce stress levels after just three days of supplementation, with continuing improvement for up to four weeks.

Suggested supplement doses range from 50 to 680 milligrams.

Check with your doctor on the recommended dosage, then choose a high-quality herbal extract like this one.

7. Turmeric

Since many of the symptoms of PMS are driven by inflammation, it’s important to quell those flames. Curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, is a master at reducing inflammatory processes in the body. Turmeric also supports liver detoxification and can promote hormone balance.

Research from 2015 shows that curcumin can downgrade the severity of common PMS symptoms thanks to its ability to modulate both inflammation and neurotransmitters.

Curcumin needs to be paired with black pepper in order to make it bioavailable. Be sure to crack black pepper in your favorite turmeric foods and drinks. It’s also important to find a supplement that clearly states that black pepper is included in the capsules, like this product.

Watch this video – 4 all-natural remedies for persistent PMS symptoms

Bottom Line

You don’t have to accept depression, mood swings, anxiety, or physical pain as a normal part of menstruation. Try getting more of these important vitamins and nutrients that can help ease PMS symptoms naturally.

Written by Aimee McNew

Author Bio:

Aimee McNew is a Certified Nutritionist who specializes in women’s health, thyroid problems, infertility, and digestive wellness. She ate her way back to health using a Paleo diet, lost 80 pounds, and had a healthy baby after numerous miscarriages. She focuses on simple nutrition practices that promote long-lasting results.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

The Cortisol-Thyroid Connection – Why Stress Can Cause Hypothyroidism


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

The Cortisol-Thyroid Connection – Why You Feel Anxious and Sick – And How to Get Your Health Back

Too much cortisol, your primary stress hormone, can wreak havoc on a sensitive thyroid. Here are five proven ways to protect your thyroid and get your health back on track.

We are all very familiar with stress, but what we often don’t know is that cortisol – a hormone in the body – drives this stress response. Cortisol is vital for a healthy immune system, blood pressure regulation, and crisis response.

Problems arise, however, when our cortisol levels remain high for too long. Excess cortisol can cause thyroid chaos, so balancing your cortisol levels are key to improving your health.

Why Your Thyroid Problems Aren’t Getting Better?

If you discover that you have low thyroid function – either as hypothyroidism or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis – it’s assumed that you need to increase your thyroid function with medication.

This is partially true for many people, though simply throwing medication at the problem won’t help you understand how the issue started in the first place. While there are many underlying triggers of low thyroid, there is one common factor: stress, or high cortisol.

Stress is a huge problem for those with thyroid issues in particular, because cortisol actively suppresses thyroid hormone output. In essence, stress decreases thyroid activity in an effort to conserve energy for the “fight or flight” task at hand.

High levels of cortisol can also lead to blood pressure changes, weight gain, poor digestion, blood sugar instability, and even anxiety and depression. These issues can all contribute to exacerbated thyroid symptoms.

The good news is that there are things you can do to decrease cortisol levels. If you’ve been feeling the pressure from work, personal life, parenting, health, or other challenges, odds are your cortisol levels are out of whack.

5 Herbs and Supplements to Decrease Cortisol

Cortisol is a natural response in the body when stressful situations arise. However, when your body is always on the alert, cortisol gets out of control.

The following five tips can help restore your natural hormone balance. Just remember to always check with your doctor before taking new herbs or supplements.

Fish Oil

Fish oil is one of those supplements that are popular for improving heart health and fighting inflammation. The good news is that it’s also helpful in reducing cortisol levels.

When choosing a fish oil supplement, make sure it is sourced from wild-caught fish and contains no fillers, like this one. Follow the recommended dosage.

L-theanine

L-theanine, an amino acid found in green tea and matcha, is helpful for dealing with anxiety because it helps to reduce cortisol levels during and after stress.

Keep in mind that l-theanine can make you feel very relaxed, so it’s best taken right before bed. For optimal results, take it regularly to reap the benefits of lowered cortisol levels the next day. Try a product like this and follow the recommended dosage from your practitioner.

Valerian Root

Valerian root is an herbal sleep aid that works by balancing neurotransmitters in the brain, reducing stress-related issues like anxiety and insomnia. Valerian is not habit-forming and can help address many types of sleep issues, like poor sleep quality. Try a product like this.

Tip: Be sure to tell your doctor about any medications you’re taking, as sleep aids have a higher chance of interacting with them.

Multivitamin

Do you take a daily multivitamin? Not everyone does, but if you’re dealing with chronic stress and cortisol problems, it might be a good idea.

Be sure to choose a multivitamin that has higher amounts of B vitamins, like this one.

More B vitamins help to reduce stress levels, even for people with certain genetic mutations (like MTHFR) that make it hard to convert and activate B vitamins.

Lavender Aromatherapy

Do you find the smell of lavender calming? Research shows that the scent of lavender can lower cortisol levels in new mothers who are sleep deprived, as well as stress in infants. The best part about lavender aromatherapy is that it’s safe and easy, with no medication or other supplemental interactions.

Diffuse lavender in your room while you sleep, at your desk while you work, in your bath or shower, or mix it with a carrier oil, like jojoba, for a stress-busting facial oil.

Watch this video – How Stress Causes Hypothyroidism | Thyroid & Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome | Samyuktha Diaries

The Bottom Line

Cortisol can be a good thing when it’s in balance. A certain level of stress helps our bodies get things done, like boost adrenaline to get through a marathon or a big work presentation.

But when stress levels become chronic, the negative effects outweigh the good. Lowering cortisol back into balance is vital for overall health as well as a balanced thyroid.

These five supplemental options help to calm elevated cortisol levels. Still, don’t underestimate the value of gentle exercise, deep breathing, and any other activities that you find stress-relieving.

Written by Aimee McNew

Author Bio:

Aimee McNew is a Certified Nutritionist who specializes in women’s health, thyroid problems, infertility, and digestive wellness. She ate her way back to health using a Paleo diet, lost 80 pounds, and had a healthy baby after numerous miscarriages. She focuses on simple nutrition practices that promote long-lasting results.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

Here’s 5 Natural Remedies to Stop Your Eye Twitching


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Here’s Why Your Eye Keeps Twitching & 5 Natural Remedies to Stop It

Eye twitches can be distracting and annoying, lasting a few seconds or minutes at a time. While these involuntary spasms aren’t typically noticeable to others, they can interfere with your daily routine and ability to concentrate.

The good news is that eye twitches usually aren’t a sign of anything serious. Since these spasms tend to happen randomly and inconsistently, the exact cause of eye twitching (also known as blepharospasm) can be hard to determine.

However, there may be certain triggers in your diet and lifestyle that are causing your eyelids to flutter. Emotions can even play a role, with some people only experiencing eye twitches when they feel sad or anxious.

Here are the most common underlying causes of eye twitching, and natural remedies to help resolve these spasms naturally.

Common Causes of Eye Twitching

  • Eye strain from staring at computer screens
  • Caffeine
  • Chronic stress
  • Nervous system disorders, such as anxiety
  • Lack of sleep
  • Allergies
  • Nutrient deficiencies
  • Excess alcohol consumption
  • Light sensitivity
  • Air pollution
  • Side effects of OTC medications
  • Eyelid inflammation (can be caused by chemicals in cosmetics, body care products or other irritants)

When is Eye Twitching Serious?

In serious cases, eye twitching can be an early sign of an underlying neurological disorder, or neuromuscular disorder such as Tourette’s syndrome. H—however, these conditions are typically accompanied by other symptoms such as facial spasms, shaking and tremors. Eye twitching can be an early sign of an underlying neurological disorder.

Although it’s not common, frequent eye twitching (lasting months at a time) can result in a condition called benign essential blepharospasm. Benign essential blepharospasm usually affects both eyes, and may also be seen with other involuntary muscular disorders, such as uncontrolled blinking and spasms in other areas of the body.

5 Natural Remedies for Eye Twitching

So, where do you begin with getting rid of the pesky twitching?

Start with reducing eye strain (for example, taking mandatory short breaks if you spend several hours on the computer each day), and improving your sleep quality—perhaps build a DIY sleep sanctuary?

In addition, there are several other natural remedies you can try to resolve eye twitching naturally.

1. Increase the Electrolytes in Your Diet

Nutrient deficiencies could be contributing to eye twitches, especially electrolytes such as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. These nutrients regulate proper muscle function and may help reduce spasms, as eye twitching happens in the small nerves and muscles around your eyes.

You can increase the electrolytes in your diet by drinking coconut water and adding spinach, avocado, banana, nuts, seeds and a wide variety of other fresh fruit and vegetables to your diet.

If you avoid sodium in your diet and experience eye twitches, you may want to begin adding small amounts of pure sea salt to your meals and eating foods that naturally contain sodium, such as tomatoes, salted nuts and seaweed, such as kombu and nori.

A routine blood test can also rule out nutrient deficiencies as a cause of eye twitches.

2. Yoga and Meditation

It’s not uncommon to experience eye twitches (or other seemingly random, involuntary muscle twitches) when you’re nervous or stressed.

In fact, stress is one of the most common triggers for eye twitching, as spasms are linked to nerves at the base of the brain within the nervous system. It’s not uncommon to experience eye twitches when you’re nervous.

Prioritizing stress management with techniques such as yoga and meditation (and even going for a deep tissue massage) will help calm your nerves, which may reduce the frequency and severity of eye twitching.

Studies have shown practicing yoga to be effective for reducing the symptoms of stress-related disorders (such as anxiety, depression and even epilepsy), which suggests it may also be effective for regulating nerve impulses related to muscle spasms.

3. Omega-3 Essential Fatty Acids

Another important nutrient for eye health are omega-3 essential fatty acids, which are healthy fats found in wild fish, nuts, seeds, algae and grass-fed meats. Our brain and eye tissues are comprised of omega-3’s, and studies show these healthy fats are necessary for healthy vision.

While there’s little research to show the link between omega-3’s and eye twitching, these essential fats are required for general optimal eye function, which may help reduce involuntary spasms.

Unfortunately, in today’s Western diet, it’s common to consume fewer omega-3’s. Instead, we overconsume omega-6 essential fatty acids from vegetable oils in deep fried foods, fast foods and processed foods, which contribute to systemic inflammation when consumed in excess.

On the other hand, omega-3 essential fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatories, and reduce systemic inflammation.Omega-3 essential fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatories.

In fact, studies show our ratio of omega-6’s to 3’s today is approximately 25:1—which indicates an alarmingly high ratio of pro-inflammatory foods (in comparison, that ratio should be closer to 2:1).

Since omega-3 essential fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatories, we could all do with increasing the amount of omega-3’s in our diets not only for eye health, but for optimal health.

The best food sources of omega-3’s are wild salmon, sardines, mackerel, chia seeds, hemp hearts, flaxseed, walnuts and algae, such as chlorella or spirulina. You can also take fish oil to easily boost the omega-3’s in your diet.

4. Acupuncture

Acupuncture, practiced widely in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), involves pricking the skin at strategic points and meridians to help rebalance the flow of energy throughout your body, which can help improve certain ailments and disorders (from skin conditions to infertility). Acupuncture is also said to be effective for muscle pain and spasms, including eye twitches.

Acupuncture is practiced by alternative healthcare practitioners, such as Naturopathic doctors and Doctors of Chinese Medicine, and offered at most integrative health centers across North America.

5. Keep a Symptom Journal

Although it may seem confusing at first, it’s not impossible to pinpoint your personal triggers for eye twitching. You can start connecting the dots by keeping a symptom journal. In your symptom journal, it’s helpful to track when eye twitching occurs, along with:

– Hours of sleep
– Hours worked
– Hours spent in front of a computer
– Rate stress levels on a scale of 1-5 (make note of stressful events)
– Track food, caffeine and alcohol consumption

While it may seem efficient enough to take mental notes in your head, seeing your daily routine on paper can paint a clearer picture of the amount of nutrients, sleep and stress relief present in your lifestyle, all of which may be contributing to your symptoms.

A symptom diary may also help you identify whether caffeine, stress or eye strain is the culprit in eye twitching, which may be when you decide to introduce yoga or meditation into your lifestyle or reduce your caffeine consumption.

Watch this video – 7 Easy Natural Remedies to Stop Your Eye Twitching

The Bottom Line

As you can see, with a combination of the right nutrients, stress support and complementary therapies such as acupuncture and massage, it’s possible to get rid of eye twitching naturally.

If symptoms persist longer than a few weeks, it’s always a good idea to speak with a licensed healthcare practitioner for individualized recommendations, as the causes (and solutions) for eye twitching will be different for each person.

Written by Brandi Black

Author Bio:

Brandi Black is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and the creator of Feel Best Naked, a health blog for women who want to clear up their skin, lose the muffin top and make the bloat disappear. After years of experiencing (and then healing) her own unbalanced hormones, she’s now obsessed with helping other women feel spectacular in their own skin with natural remedies for hormone balance.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

14 Proven Supplements to Control Your Blood Sugar Level


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Help keep diabetes in check with these 14 supplements that have been proven to help control blood sugar levels.

Managing blood sugar through diet alone can be highly effective, but some people need a little extra support. Thankfully, supplements to control blood sugar have been researched extensively, and several have passed the test.

Here are the top 14 supplements that have been proven to help keep glucose and insulin levels in check.

1. Berberine

Berberine is a bitter medicinal alkaloid found in the roots and stems of goldenseal, Oregon grape, barberry, and tree turmeric.  It has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda and can be used as a dye because of its deep, yellow-golden color.

Berberine can be effective at lowering blood glucose levels for those with type 2 diabetes or excessive glucose levels. Taken in capsule form twice daily at 500 milligrams for at least three months, it can reduce fasting glucose and postprandial glucose.

Some research has even shown berberine to be as effective as Metformin, a medication commonly prescribed to control glucose levels in diabetic patients, when taken two or three times daily.

2. Cinnamon

Cinnamon comes from the inner bark of a tree common to southeastern Asia. There are two common forms of cinnamon: cassia and Ceylon. Ceylon cinnamon is the superior form though buyers should be aware that spices purchased in stores are most often the cassia variety.

Significant research has been done evaluating the health benefits of cinnamon for diabetes and blood sugar control. While not all studies agree on the specific degree of benefits, most agree that a daily intake of cinnamon can reduce fasting blood glucose by an average of 24 mg/dL, as well as reduce cholesterol and triglycerides.

The average dose of cinnamon used for blood glucose benefits is between 120 mg and 6 grams daily, for up to four months.

3. Curcumin

Turmeric, whose active ingredient is curcumin, is a warm spice known for its deep yellow-orange color and distinct earthy flavor.

Turmeric is renowned for its anti-inflammatory benefits and can be used to naturally address depression, arthritis, and other chronic conditions. When taken once or twice daily in 750 mg capsules, curcumin can actually reduce glucose levels and can prevent diabetes from developing in those who are pre-diabetic.

Turmeric can also be consumed as a tea or other drinks, such as this turmeric-mango tonic.

4. ALA

ALA, or alpha-lipoic acid, is an antioxidant found in sources like broccoli, spinach, and brewer’s yeast.

When used in concentrated supplement form, ALA can improve insulin sensitivity and glucose levels.  Dosing can range anywhere from 300 mg to 1800 mg daily and can show effective benefits in as little as four weeks.

ALA can also naturally help to prevent the onset of diabetes in those who have prediabetes or insulin sensitivity, especially when taken daily for at least two weeks.

5. Chromium Picolinate

Chromium picolinate is a trace mineral that can be used to gain glucose control in those with all forms of diabetes, people with metabolic syndrome, and women with PCOS-related glucose and insulin issues.

While lower doses can be effective, higher doses will have more definitive results. Research shows that 1,000 micrograms per day in divided doses may be optimal for controlling glucose quickly.

6. Vitamin D3

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that the body can synthesize from cholesterol after direct sunlight exposure.

Research shows that people with lower vitamin D levels have an increased risk of developing glucose problems and type 2 diabetes.

Since dietary sources of vitamin D are limited, and sunshine exposure isn’t available year-round for most people, supplementing with a high-quality vitamin D3 capsule can provide the best health benefits. Take vitamin D after a meal with some fat, or at the same time as fish oil, for best absorption.

7. Ginseng

There are three distinct varieties of this adaptogenic herb – American ginseng, Panax ginseng, and Siberian ginseng. While they have similar properties, some are more effective than others, depending on the condition being treated.

For blood sugar control and diabetes, American ginseng seems to be most effective at reducing postprandial glucose levels when taken up to two hours before a meal in a dose of 3 grams. American ginseng can also reduce fasting blood glucose when taken daily for eight weeks, between 100 and 200 mg per day.

Siberian ginseng can also help to reduce fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels when taken daily for three months in a dose of 480 mg.

While Panax ginseng has health benefits of its own, there is no solid research backing its ability to control diabetes.

8. Milk Thistle

Milk thistle is a flowering plant known for its natural detox support. Research shows that milk thistle can be beneficial for lowering fasting blood sugar levels, along with hemoglobin A1C, cholesterol, and triglycerides.

When taken as 200 mg three times daily, milk thistle can also help to improve insulin resistance in pre-diabetics and those with active diabetes.

While milk thistle is most effective when taken in capsule form, it can also be brewed as an herbal tea.

9. Inulin

Inulin is a starchy fiber found in fruits, vegetables, and herbs like onions, bananas, leeks, artichokes, and asparagus. When in supplement form, inulin is usually derived from chicory root.

Inulin is a prebiotic that can help to slow the breakdown of sugars and can help to stabilize glucose and insulin levels.

You should ease into inulin supplementation slowly. Start with 1-2 grams once a day for 2-3 weeks. After that, increase your dosage by 1-2 grams, waiting another 2-3 weeks to adjust. The max inulin dose for anyone should be 5-7 grams daily or as recommended by a doctor.

10. Fenugreek

Fenugreek is an aromatic herb that produces powerful medicinal seeds. Most notably, fenugreek is used to boost immunity. It has a slightly sweet flavor, similar to maple syrup.

Fenugreek has been a long-time natural remedy for diabetes in Africa, Asia, and parts of Europe.

Research indicates that fenugreek can be helpful in improving blood glucose levels, including postprandial and fasting, when taken between five and 50 grams for a minimum of four days and up to 24 weeks.

Fenugreek also can be ground into a flour and added to foods for an equally effective way to supplement.

11. White Mulberry

White mulberry is a small shrub with small, pinkish white berries that have a bitter taste.

When used as a supplement with one gram three times daily, white mulberry has been shown to help reduce fasting glucose levels by as much as 27 percent when used consistently for at least four weeks. The same effects don’t appear to happen if the berries are eaten directly.

12. Psyllium

Psyllium is a popular supplemental fiber, often used to relieve constipation. It comes from an herb that primarily grows in India, and can be purchased as husks, capsules, powder, or granules.

It is sometimes added to baked goods to increase fiber content.

Because psyllium doesn’t fully digest, it can help to decrease glucose levels and provide balanced digestive function.

Because it is a gentle food source, psyllium causes little side effects and is well tolerated by most individuals, especially when it is gradually eased into the diet.

Psyllium can help to reduce postprandial glucose levels by as much as 20 percent, in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Psyllium can be taken in capsule or powder form. Because dosages can differ dramatically, it’s important to follow the product recommendations but to ease into the full amount by starting with a quarter dose, and then increasing over a week or two. Psyllium, regardless of the form, always needs taken with a full 8-12 ounces glass of water.

13. Glucomannan

Glucomannan is a dietary fiber derived from the konjac plant. When taken orally, it can help to reduce both cholesterol and glucose levels, especially in people with type 2 diabetes.

Beyond glucose control alone, glucomannan can help to improve sensitivity in pre-diabetic individuals as well as those with type 2 diabetes.

Glucomannan can also be found in foods, most notably in shirataki noodles, which are low-carb and Paleo-friendly.

14. Magnesium

Magnesium is an essential mineral that has an impact on more than 300 cellular reactions within the body. It has gained exposure in recent years for the positive effects it can have on sleep, stress, muscle cramps and pains, and constipation.

Magnesium can be found in many food sources, including broccoli, leafy greens, almonds, dark chocolate, and other seeds and nuts. Still, some people get far too little magnesium and are operating under a consistently low level, which can increase the risk of developing diabetes.

Improving magnesium intake can help to lower fasting insulin and can also reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Taking 100 mg daily can be beneficial, although as much as 300 mg is considered safe and effective.

Watch this video – How to Bring BLOOD SUGAR DOWN quickly. Lower blood sugar fast! Dr. Ergin gives tips! SUGARMD

Bottom Line

While these supplements can help balance glucose and insulin levels, they are often only effective when dietary and lifestyle factors, like exercise, are already in play.

It’s important to note that supplements can’t fix a bad diet, but can only add to what is already in place with a health-supportive lifestyle.

Written by Aimee McNew

Author Bio:

Aimee McNew is a Certified Nutritionist who specializes in women’s health, thyroid problems, infertility, and digestive wellness. She ate her way back to health using a Paleo diet, lost 80 pounds, and had a healthy baby after numerous miscarriages. She focuses on simple nutrition practices that promote long-lasting results.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

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