Here’s 5 Natural Remedies to Stop Your Eye Twitching


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Here’s Why Your Eye Keeps Twitching & 5 Natural Remedies to Stop It

Eye twitches can be distracting and annoying, lasting a few seconds or minutes at a time. While these involuntary spasms aren’t typically noticeable to others, they can interfere with your daily routine and ability to concentrate.

The good news is that eye twitches usually aren’t a sign of anything serious. Since these spasms tend to happen randomly and inconsistently, the exact cause of eye twitching (also known as blepharospasm) can be hard to determine.

However, there may be certain triggers in your diet and lifestyle that are causing your eyelids to flutter. Emotions can even play a role, with some people only experiencing eye twitches when they feel sad or anxious.

Here are the most common underlying causes of eye twitching, and natural remedies to help resolve these spasms naturally.

Common Causes of Eye Twitching

  • Eye strain from staring at computer screens
  • Caffeine
  • Chronic stress
  • Nervous system disorders, such as anxiety
  • Lack of sleep
  • Allergies
  • Nutrient deficiencies
  • Excess alcohol consumption
  • Light sensitivity
  • Air pollution
  • Side effects of OTC medications
  • Eyelid inflammation (can be caused by chemicals in cosmetics, body care products or other irritants)

When is Eye Twitching Serious?

In serious cases, eye twitching can be an early sign of an underlying neurological disorder, or neuromuscular disorder such as Tourette’s syndrome. H—however, these conditions are typically accompanied by other symptoms such as facial spasms, shaking and tremors. Eye twitching can be an early sign of an underlying neurological disorder.

Although it’s not common, frequent eye twitching (lasting months at a time) can result in a condition called benign essential blepharospasm. Benign essential blepharospasm usually affects both eyes, and may also be seen with other involuntary muscular disorders, such as uncontrolled blinking and spasms in other areas of the body.

5 Natural Remedies for Eye Twitching

So, where do you begin with getting rid of the pesky twitching?

Start with reducing eye strain (for example, taking mandatory short breaks if you spend several hours on the computer each day), and improving your sleep quality—perhaps build a DIY sleep sanctuary?

In addition, there are several other natural remedies you can try to resolve eye twitching naturally.

1. Increase the Electrolytes in Your Diet

Nutrient deficiencies could be contributing to eye twitches, especially electrolytes such as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. These nutrients regulate proper muscle function and may help reduce spasms, as eye twitching happens in the small nerves and muscles around your eyes.

You can increase the electrolytes in your diet by drinking coconut water and adding spinach, avocado, banana, nuts, seeds and a wide variety of other fresh fruit and vegetables to your diet.

If you avoid sodium in your diet and experience eye twitches, you may want to begin adding small amounts of pure sea salt to your meals and eating foods that naturally contain sodium, such as tomatoes, salted nuts and seaweed, such as kombu and nori.

A routine blood test can also rule out nutrient deficiencies as a cause of eye twitches.

2. Yoga and Meditation

It’s not uncommon to experience eye twitches (or other seemingly random, involuntary muscle twitches) when you’re nervous or stressed.

In fact, stress is one of the most common triggers for eye twitching, as spasms are linked to nerves at the base of the brain within the nervous system. It’s not uncommon to experience eye twitches when you’re nervous.

Prioritizing stress management with techniques such as yoga and meditation (and even going for a deep tissue massage) will help calm your nerves, which may reduce the frequency and severity of eye twitching.

Studies have shown practicing yoga to be effective for reducing the symptoms of stress-related disorders (such as anxiety, depression and even epilepsy), which suggests it may also be effective for regulating nerve impulses related to muscle spasms.

3. Omega-3 Essential Fatty Acids

Another important nutrient for eye health are omega-3 essential fatty acids, which are healthy fats found in wild fish, nuts, seeds, algae and grass-fed meats. Our brain and eye tissues are comprised of omega-3’s, and studies show these healthy fats are necessary for healthy vision.

While there’s little research to show the link between omega-3’s and eye twitching, these essential fats are required for general optimal eye function, which may help reduce involuntary spasms.

Unfortunately, in today’s Western diet, it’s common to consume fewer omega-3’s. Instead, we overconsume omega-6 essential fatty acids from vegetable oils in deep fried foods, fast foods and processed foods, which contribute to systemic inflammation when consumed in excess.

On the other hand, omega-3 essential fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatories, and reduce systemic inflammation.Omega-3 essential fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatories.

In fact, studies show our ratio of omega-6’s to 3’s today is approximately 25:1—which indicates an alarmingly high ratio of pro-inflammatory foods (in comparison, that ratio should be closer to 2:1).

Since omega-3 essential fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatories, we could all do with increasing the amount of omega-3’s in our diets not only for eye health, but for optimal health.

The best food sources of omega-3’s are wild salmon, sardines, mackerel, chia seeds, hemp hearts, flaxseed, walnuts and algae, such as chlorella or spirulina. You can also take fish oil to easily boost the omega-3’s in your diet.

4. Acupuncture

Acupuncture, practiced widely in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), involves pricking the skin at strategic points and meridians to help rebalance the flow of energy throughout your body, which can help improve certain ailments and disorders (from skin conditions to infertility). Acupuncture is also said to be effective for muscle pain and spasms, including eye twitches.

Acupuncture is practiced by alternative healthcare practitioners, such as Naturopathic doctors and Doctors of Chinese Medicine, and offered at most integrative health centers across North America.

5. Keep a Symptom Journal

Although it may seem confusing at first, it’s not impossible to pinpoint your personal triggers for eye twitching. You can start connecting the dots by keeping a symptom journal. In your symptom journal, it’s helpful to track when eye twitching occurs, along with:

– Hours of sleep
– Hours worked
– Hours spent in front of a computer
– Rate stress levels on a scale of 1-5 (make note of stressful events)
– Track food, caffeine and alcohol consumption

While it may seem efficient enough to take mental notes in your head, seeing your daily routine on paper can paint a clearer picture of the amount of nutrients, sleep and stress relief present in your lifestyle, all of which may be contributing to your symptoms.

A symptom diary may also help you identify whether caffeine, stress or eye strain is the culprit in eye twitching, which may be when you decide to introduce yoga or meditation into your lifestyle or reduce your caffeine consumption.

Watch this video – 7 Easy Natural Remedies to Stop Your Eye Twitching

The Bottom Line

As you can see, with a combination of the right nutrients, stress support and complementary therapies such as acupuncture and massage, it’s possible to get rid of eye twitching naturally.

If symptoms persist longer than a few weeks, it’s always a good idea to speak with a licensed healthcare practitioner for individualized recommendations, as the causes (and solutions) for eye twitching will be different for each person.

Written by Brandi Black

Author Bio:

Brandi Black is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and the creator of Feel Best Naked, a health blog for women who want to clear up their skin, lose the muffin top and make the bloat disappear. After years of experiencing (and then healing) her own unbalanced hormones, she’s now obsessed with helping other women feel spectacular in their own skin with natural remedies for hormone balance.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

14 Proven Supplements to Control Your Blood Sugar Level


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Help keep diabetes in check with these 14 supplements that have been proven to help control blood sugar levels.

Managing blood sugar through diet alone can be highly effective, but some people need a little extra support. Thankfully, supplements to control blood sugar have been researched extensively, and several have passed the test.

Here are the top 14 supplements that have been proven to help keep glucose and insulin levels in check.

1. Berberine

Berberine is a bitter medicinal alkaloid found in the roots and stems of goldenseal, Oregon grape, barberry, and tree turmeric.  It has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda and can be used as a dye because of its deep, yellow-golden color.

Berberine can be effective at lowering blood glucose levels for those with type 2 diabetes or excessive glucose levels. Taken in capsule form twice daily at 500 milligrams for at least three months, it can reduce fasting glucose and postprandial glucose.

Some research has even shown berberine to be as effective as Metformin, a medication commonly prescribed to control glucose levels in diabetic patients, when taken two or three times daily.

2. Cinnamon

Cinnamon comes from the inner bark of a tree common to southeastern Asia. There are two common forms of cinnamon: cassia and Ceylon. Ceylon cinnamon is the superior form though buyers should be aware that spices purchased in stores are most often the cassia variety.

Significant research has been done evaluating the health benefits of cinnamon for diabetes and blood sugar control. While not all studies agree on the specific degree of benefits, most agree that a daily intake of cinnamon can reduce fasting blood glucose by an average of 24 mg/dL, as well as reduce cholesterol and triglycerides.

The average dose of cinnamon used for blood glucose benefits is between 120 mg and 6 grams daily, for up to four months.

3. Curcumin

Turmeric, whose active ingredient is curcumin, is a warm spice known for its deep yellow-orange color and distinct earthy flavor.

Turmeric is renowned for its anti-inflammatory benefits and can be used to naturally address depression, arthritis, and other chronic conditions. When taken once or twice daily in 750 mg capsules, curcumin can actually reduce glucose levels and can prevent diabetes from developing in those who are pre-diabetic.

Turmeric can also be consumed as a tea or other drinks, such as this turmeric-mango tonic.

4. ALA

ALA, or alpha-lipoic acid, is an antioxidant found in sources like broccoli, spinach, and brewer’s yeast.

When used in concentrated supplement form, ALA can improve insulin sensitivity and glucose levels.  Dosing can range anywhere from 300 mg to 1800 mg daily and can show effective benefits in as little as four weeks.

ALA can also naturally help to prevent the onset of diabetes in those who have prediabetes or insulin sensitivity, especially when taken daily for at least two weeks.

5. Chromium Picolinate

Chromium picolinate is a trace mineral that can be used to gain glucose control in those with all forms of diabetes, people with metabolic syndrome, and women with PCOS-related glucose and insulin issues.

While lower doses can be effective, higher doses will have more definitive results. Research shows that 1,000 micrograms per day in divided doses may be optimal for controlling glucose quickly.

6. Vitamin D3

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that the body can synthesize from cholesterol after direct sunlight exposure.

Research shows that people with lower vitamin D levels have an increased risk of developing glucose problems and type 2 diabetes.

Since dietary sources of vitamin D are limited, and sunshine exposure isn’t available year-round for most people, supplementing with a high-quality vitamin D3 capsule can provide the best health benefits. Take vitamin D after a meal with some fat, or at the same time as fish oil, for best absorption.

7. Ginseng

There are three distinct varieties of this adaptogenic herb – American ginseng, Panax ginseng, and Siberian ginseng. While they have similar properties, some are more effective than others, depending on the condition being treated.

For blood sugar control and diabetes, American ginseng seems to be most effective at reducing postprandial glucose levels when taken up to two hours before a meal in a dose of 3 grams. American ginseng can also reduce fasting blood glucose when taken daily for eight weeks, between 100 and 200 mg per day.

Siberian ginseng can also help to reduce fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels when taken daily for three months in a dose of 480 mg.

While Panax ginseng has health benefits of its own, there is no solid research backing its ability to control diabetes.

8. Milk Thistle

Milk thistle is a flowering plant known for its natural detox support. Research shows that milk thistle can be beneficial for lowering fasting blood sugar levels, along with hemoglobin A1C, cholesterol, and triglycerides.

When taken as 200 mg three times daily, milk thistle can also help to improve insulin resistance in pre-diabetics and those with active diabetes.

While milk thistle is most effective when taken in capsule form, it can also be brewed as an herbal tea.

9. Inulin

Inulin is a starchy fiber found in fruits, vegetables, and herbs like onions, bananas, leeks, artichokes, and asparagus. When in supplement form, inulin is usually derived from chicory root.

Inulin is a prebiotic that can help to slow the breakdown of sugars and can help to stabilize glucose and insulin levels.

You should ease into inulin supplementation slowly. Start with 1-2 grams once a day for 2-3 weeks. After that, increase your dosage by 1-2 grams, waiting another 2-3 weeks to adjust. The max inulin dose for anyone should be 5-7 grams daily or as recommended by a doctor.

10. Fenugreek

Fenugreek is an aromatic herb that produces powerful medicinal seeds. Most notably, fenugreek is used to boost immunity. It has a slightly sweet flavor, similar to maple syrup.

Fenugreek has been a long-time natural remedy for diabetes in Africa, Asia, and parts of Europe.

Research indicates that fenugreek can be helpful in improving blood glucose levels, including postprandial and fasting, when taken between five and 50 grams for a minimum of four days and up to 24 weeks.

Fenugreek also can be ground into a flour and added to foods for an equally effective way to supplement.

11. White Mulberry

White mulberry is a small shrub with small, pinkish white berries that have a bitter taste.

When used as a supplement with one gram three times daily, white mulberry has been shown to help reduce fasting glucose levels by as much as 27 percent when used consistently for at least four weeks. The same effects don’t appear to happen if the berries are eaten directly.

12. Psyllium

Psyllium is a popular supplemental fiber, often used to relieve constipation. It comes from an herb that primarily grows in India, and can be purchased as husks, capsules, powder, or granules.

It is sometimes added to baked goods to increase fiber content.

Because psyllium doesn’t fully digest, it can help to decrease glucose levels and provide balanced digestive function.

Because it is a gentle food source, psyllium causes little side effects and is well tolerated by most individuals, especially when it is gradually eased into the diet.

Psyllium can help to reduce postprandial glucose levels by as much as 20 percent, in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Psyllium can be taken in capsule or powder form. Because dosages can differ dramatically, it’s important to follow the product recommendations but to ease into the full amount by starting with a quarter dose, and then increasing over a week or two. Psyllium, regardless of the form, always needs taken with a full 8-12 ounces glass of water.

13. Glucomannan

Glucomannan is a dietary fiber derived from the konjac plant. When taken orally, it can help to reduce both cholesterol and glucose levels, especially in people with type 2 diabetes.

Beyond glucose control alone, glucomannan can help to improve sensitivity in pre-diabetic individuals as well as those with type 2 diabetes.

Glucomannan can also be found in foods, most notably in shirataki noodles, which are low-carb and Paleo-friendly.

14. Magnesium

Magnesium is an essential mineral that has an impact on more than 300 cellular reactions within the body. It has gained exposure in recent years for the positive effects it can have on sleep, stress, muscle cramps and pains, and constipation.

Magnesium can be found in many food sources, including broccoli, leafy greens, almonds, dark chocolate, and other seeds and nuts. Still, some people get far too little magnesium and are operating under a consistently low level, which can increase the risk of developing diabetes.

Improving magnesium intake can help to lower fasting insulin and can also reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Taking 100 mg daily can be beneficial, although as much as 300 mg is considered safe and effective.

Watch this video – How to Bring BLOOD SUGAR DOWN quickly. Lower blood sugar fast! Dr. Ergin gives tips! SUGARMD

Bottom Line

While these supplements can help balance glucose and insulin levels, they are often only effective when dietary and lifestyle factors, like exercise, are already in play.

It’s important to note that supplements can’t fix a bad diet, but can only add to what is already in place with a health-supportive lifestyle.

Written by Aimee McNew

Author Bio:

Aimee McNew is a Certified Nutritionist who specializes in women’s health, thyroid problems, infertility, and digestive wellness. She ate her way back to health using a Paleo diet, lost 80 pounds, and had a healthy baby after numerous miscarriages. She focuses on simple nutrition practices that promote long-lasting results.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

Raw Honey Vs Processed Honey + Why Raw is Better


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Honey. It’s quite possibly one of the purest “Paleo” foods we have left today. Despite the sting that may come with obtaining a handful, we can be sure that raw honey has been harvested and used as a tonic and medicine for at least 8,000 years. 

What is it about this nectar that inspires some to go such great lengths for a morsel?

Aside from its sweet taste, honey is composed of roughly 200 substances such as amino acids, flavonoids, minerals, and enzymes that make it an energy-packed nutrient bomb – something that would have been extremely appealing to our ancestors, and is still appealing today.

But is the friendly plastic honey bear we know in the grocery aisle today the same as the medicinal honey found in the ancient world? And why does it matter? Mainly because it turns out that familiar bear might just giving us a bottle of sugar, rather than true medicinal honey.

Most Honey in Stores is Pasteurized

Most of the honey we see on store shelves is pasteurized, i.e., heated to the point where no microorganisms, beneficial or otherwise, can survive. While many might label this practice beneficial, as it gets rid of any dangerous bacteria that could be lurking in the liquid, research is beginning to show otherwise.

As we’ll discover below, pasteurization and processing of honey not only eliminates potentially dangerous pathogens, but also most of the beneficial substances in honey that have categorized it as a medicinal food throughout the centuries. This, in essence, leaves us with a sugar syrup void of enzymes and vitamins, no matter how pretty the packaging.

7 Raw Honey Benefits

Luckily, raw, unprocessed honey is making a comeback from the ancient world. Let’s take a look at why you should invest in quality raw honey over regular honey (sorry, honey bear).

1. Raw Honey Is Antiviral, Antifungal and Antibacterial

The use of honey as a disinfectant and antibacterial has resurfaced in recent years, with science confirming what the ancients apparently knew when they slathered the sweet substance on wounds. They may not have been aware that microbes were the cause of infection at the time; they simply knew that honey prevented it.

Now research has found that raw, untreated honey indeed acts as a potent antibacterial, anti-fungal, and antiviral, even in the face of “superbugs” such as those found in staph (MRSA) infections. In fact, scientists have discovered that “regular”, raw honey (not including other types like Manuka – a potent medicinal honey) acts as a broad-spectrum antibacterial against 60 species of bacteria.

There are several compounds in raw honey that are responsible for its sanitizing effects (namely glucose oxidase, which, when combined with water, produces hydrogen peroxide). Unfortunately, glucose oxidase is a heat-sensitive enzyme, meaning pasteurization can impair its ability to produce hydrogen peroxide.

In addition to protecting against infections, raw honey has also been shown to heal already infected wounds that are resistant to conventional antibiotic therapies.

2. Raw Honey Stabilizes Blood Sugar

Although honey is extremely rich in natural sugars, it has been shown to have a positive effect on blood sugar levels. Even researchers were startled by the finding, stating in one study“, … honey is sweet and rich in sugars and it would not have been expected to exert a dose-dependent hypoglycemic effect”.

The evidence is especially striking in diabetics, where honey is found to decrease serum glucose levels, increase serum insulin levels, and“… ameliorate(s) several metabolic derangements commonly observed in diabetes”.

 In other words, raw honey has a stabilizing effect on sugar metabolism in diabetics – despite its high sugar content.

3. Raw Honey Is Rich in Enzymes and Promotes Digestive Health

Enzymes are extremely important for keeping our body functioning at an optimum level.

Researchers have discovered over 3,000 enzymes responsible for every major biochemical reaction in the body, including, but not limited to: driving nutrients into cells, absorbing oxygen, producing energy, breaking down fats and carbohydrates, and regulating hormones.

Raw honey contains a host of these beneficial enzymes, which have been shown to play a special role in promoting digestive health. For instance, several studies have shown raw honey to be effective against stomach ulcers and also help repair damaged intestinal mucosa.

In addition to these enzymes, raw honey also contains 4 to 5% fructooligosaccharides, which act as probiotics, and have been shown in studies to increase levels of beneficial bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the colon.

Need another reason to go raw? The enzyme levels in raw honey drop an average of 35 percent (with some enzymes such as invertase being almost completely eliminated) due to pasteurization.

4. Raw Honey Is Anti-Inflammatory

The enzymes in raw honey that we spoke of earlier also have anti-inflammatory properties. Its anti-inflammatory effects have been studied in a variety of situations, ranging from topical wounds to intestinal inflammation.

For instance, studies have shown raw honey to be effective in treating eczema and psoriasis, as well as being as effective as prescription medication in the treatment of colitis.

5. Raw Honey Boosts Immunity

According to studies on raw honey’s effect on cancer, researchers have concluded that it has the ability to act as a natural immune booster (not to mention as a natural “cancer vaccine”).

Aside from boosting the body’s production of antibodies to help fight disease, honey also contains potent antioxidants that play a role in supporting the immune system.

6. Raw Honey Lowers Cholesterol

Honey contains an abundant amount of antioxidants, referred to as “phenolics”, that have been associated with protective effects against cardiovascular disease.

Studies have also shown that patients receiving 70 grams of natural honey per day for 30 days reduced total cholesterol levels.

7. Raw Honey Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity

Raw honey may also act as an anti-carcinogenic, according to recent research. In one study, researchers found raw honey significantly inhibited growth of bladder cancer cells in vitro, concluding“, … injection of 6 and 12% honey as well as oral ingestion of honey significantly inhibited tumor growth”.

Other Benefits of Raw Honey

The list of the benefits of honey is extensive and, most importantly, backed by research. In addition to the benefits above, it has also been shown to be effective against respiratory ailments, measles, chest pain, male impotence, cardiac disorders, and high blood pressure.

Note: be sure any honey you’re purchasing plainly states “raw” or “unpasteurized”, as the terms “natural” and “all-natural” do not mean it’s raw. Also, don’t worry if your honey has bits of propolis (parts of the honeycomb) mixed in. This is a good sign, indicating that the honey has undergone very little, if any, processing.

Raw Honey vs. Pasteurized Honey

To recap, raw honey contains a host of beneficial substances found to be lacking in regular processed honey. Namely, regular honey lacks beneficial enzymes destroyed by heat pasteurization, and also several antioxidants that are heat sensitive.

Unfortunately, many of these compounds are the ones responsible for the abundant medicinal properties associated with honey. For instance, remember those phenolic compounds researchers believe are responsible for honey’s beneficial effect on cholesterol?

It turns out that some of these have exhibited decreases in total levels when exposed to heat or pasteurization. This makes purchasing raw, unpasteurized honey even more crucial if you’re consuming it for its health effects.

As we can see, raw honey win hands-down when it comes to health. When unprocessed, with all of its beneficial enzymes intact, it can have potent medicinal properties lacking in commercial honeys.

Watch this video – How to check if Honey is Pure or Not?(Honey Quality Test)

Written by Megan Patiry

Author Bio:

Megan is an inquisitive nutrition and wellness writer harboring an editorial love affair with the decadent and the nutritious. She is a dedicated researcher in all areas of ancestral health, a certified specialist in fitness nutrition, personal trainer, and professional almond milk latte addict.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

8 Natural Benefits of Cinnamon with Honey for Better Health


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Two of the most delicious superfoods on the planet — honey and cinnamon — may also be some of the most medicinal. Find out how this power duo can help you amp up your health.

Cinnamon has been used medicinally by Chinese and Ayurvedic practitioners for over 2,000 years to promote optimal health.

Honey is equally as popular, with a rich history that goes far back as ancient Rome, Egypt and Greece as an antibacterial agent. The healing power of honey was known as early as 300 BC by Aristotle and Aristoxenus as a salve for the eyes and wounds.

Mixing honey and cinnamon boosts their antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties.

There are many folk stories that say these powerful foods are medicine that can heal everything from everything from diabetes to acne, and now scientific research is proving that there’s truth in the ancient folklore.

Here are the most common ways honey and cinnamon can be used to treat various conditions.

Honey and Cinnamon Health Benefits

Cinnamon is most popular as an anti-inflammatory and in treating digestive imbalancesmenstrual pain and joint pain thanks to its high content of cinnamaldehyde – the anti-inflammatory compound that gives it taste and smell.

Honey, also known as an anti-inflammatory, is also full of these nutrients:

Honey is an also powerful antimicrobial, wound-healer and antioxidant. When combined, cinnamon and honey make a powerful duo that boast a wide range of health benefits.

8 Amazing Benefits of Cinnamon & Honey

Alone, cinnamon and honey make very potent medicinal foods that control inflammation, fight free radicals and benefit the immune system.

Looking specifically, here are some of the benefits experienced by people who mix honey and cinnamon:

Reduces Arthritis

Arthritis is essential inflammation of the joints, which causes pains in the muscles around the joint area. Due to it’s anti-inflammatory benefits, research shows that old bee’s honey can be effectively used to treat rheumatoid arthritis.

Weight Loss

Regularly consumed first thing in the morning, a mixture of warm water, honey and cinnamon can help improve blood glucose levels and reduce body fat.

One study in particular finds that if you replace sucrose with raw honey it can help prevent weight gain, while promoting the secretion of leptin and gerdin – appetite suppressing hormones that keep us from overeating.

Fights Bacterial Skin Infection

Raw honey in combination with cinnamon essential oil is an incredible remedy for treating bacterial skin infections and acne. This is due to the antibacterial properties in both of these medicinal substances.

Manuka honey, hailing from New Zealand, is particularly great for skin infections as it contains a significantly higher antibacterial power compared to most other honey.

Strengthens Immunity

Both cinnamon and raw honey are wonderful immune modulating medicines. Many scientific studies have found that the some 200 plus nutritional properties to raw honey strengthens the white blood cells, which help fight off harmful pathogens.

Raw honey also up-regulates the detoxification system, which helps keep toxicity low and the immune system from going into overdrive as in the case of autoimmunity.

Clears Sinuses

The antibacterial activity of cinnamon and honey is great for clearing away pathogens that can lead to sinusitis. Sinusitis is caused by bacterial biofilms, which are a sticky, filmy coating that protects bacteria clusters.

Manuka honey and cinnamon are actually more effective than antibiotics in killing off this bacterial biofilm and relieving sinusitis.

Treats Hair Loss

A mixture of warmed olive oil, one tablespoon of raw honey and a teaspoon of cinnamon can help halt hair loss. Studies suggest that the use of honey on the scalp can effectively treat seborrheic dermatitis.

Boosts Energy

Traditional Chinese Medicine used cinnamon to promote a flow of vital energy for many centuries. Cinnamon can regulate insulin levels, resulting in improved brain activity and locomotion. Again, Ceylon cinnamon is the best quality honey for achieving this result.

In combination with honey, which is pure glucose readily absorbed by the liver, you get a low-glycemic energy boost that fuels our body easily.

Longevity

Regularly consumption of a cinnamon and honey tea can lead to a life of longevity. This tonic builds up immunity and safeguards the body from harmful viruses and disease such as diabetes.

How to Take Cinnamon & Honey?

There are many ways to consume cinnamon and honey together, but the best way is to simply mix 1 tablespoon each per cup of hot water and consume at least twice daily. You can also use a Manuka honey irrigation for sinus problems or apply as a facial mask. The options are endless!

Watch this video – 10 Health Benefits of Honey with Cinnamon

Written by Nick Kowalski

Author Bio:

Nick Kowalski is a Transformational Coach, fitness model and unconditional lover. You can find more of his writing on his blog NicksFit. His mission is to inspire the transformation toward love consciousness. Follow him on Instagram for more living in love inspiration and transformational mindset motivation!

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

6 Reasons You Keep Getting Sick & How to Boost Immunity


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Are you one of those people who seem to get sick more often than others? Read on to find out how to boost your immunity to stop catching those pesky colds!

It’s that time of year… cold and flu season. Runny noses, coughs and germs start to spread like wildfire through offices, day-cares, and gyms as we all move indoors during the colder, drier and darker days of winter.

Nothing derails your productivity at work or in the gym faster than a nasty cold. Fight back this year and find out how you can stop bacteria and viruses in their tracks.

Here are six reasons you get sick and how you can fix them.

1. You Don’t Follow a Seasonal Diet

If you follow the patterns of nature and try to eat foods that are fresh and in-season, it’s remarkable how you correct for deficiencies without even knowing it.

For example, vitamin A is a common deficiency in the general population, and when levels are low, it impairs the “first line of defense” of your immune system (i.e., neutrophils, macrophages, natural killer cells, etc.) 

Vitamin A is found in abundance in orange vegetables that are typically harvested in fall. Eating squash, pumpkins, etc. helps rebuild mucosal immunity, keeping the immune army in your sinuses and gut wall strong and impermeable throughout the winter.

The Fix: Follow an ancestral approach and eat seasonally. Pumpkins, squash, sweet potatoes, and carrots are all fall classics rich in immune-boosting vitamin A. They make a great roasted veggie option for lunch or dinner, or you can puree them into soups to warm up and stay cold- and flu-free.

2. You’re Over-Caffeinated!

As the days get shorter, you should be getting more rest and recovery.

Unfortunately, the end of the year is typically the busiest time for people at work and at home, as we gear up for the holiday season. The accumulation of stressors, a busy work and family schedule, lack of sleep, and eating on the run is the perfect recipe for fatigue, and the first thing most people reach for is an extra cup of coffee (or two) throughout the day.

You’re already burning the candle at both ends, and by adding more stimulants to the mix, you tax your nervous system even further. This leaves you more likely to get sick with colds or the flu. Feel the sniffles coming? Give your body a break and lay off the coffee for 1-2 days a week.

The Fix: If you are run down, take your foot off the accelerator and reduce your coffee intake by 50%. If you only drink one cup per day, take 1-2 days off per week to give your nervous system a break and your immune system a chance to recharge.

As a general rule, always drink your last cup before noon so you don’t get sick.

3. Your Belly Is Fighting a Losing Battle

Did you know that over 70% of your immune system is in your gut? That’s right, all the “good” bacteria in your gut play a key role in preventing foreign invaders from penetrating your immune defenses. 

However, there are a lot of things in today’s environment that can sway the balance of “good” to “bad” gut flora and lead to dysbiosis or the accumulation of too much bad gut bacteria. A hectic schedule, stress, alcohol, caffeine, sugar, processed foods and the environment can all derail a healthy gut, causing you to get sick.

The Fix: Add more Paleo-friendly fermented foods like sauerkraut, kimchi, kombucha tea, tamari sauce, and yogurt to get your daily dose of “good” bacteria.

If you’re feeling run down, add a probiotic supplement daily to prevent bacteria from adhering to mucous membranes and penetrating your immune defenses.

If for some reason you have to take antibiotics, be sure to include a probiotic supplement twice daily (away from your medication) to help maintain healthy gut flora.

4. Your Vitamin D Levels Are Too Low

Vitamin D status is a crucial factor for maintaining health and fighting off colds from November until March. Vitamin D upregulates key antimicrobial proteins which keep foreign bacteria and viruses at bay.

Unfortunately, even though ancestral foods like eggs, pork, fish, and mushrooms have some vitamin D, it’s not typically enough to maintain your blood levels above 30ng/ml, the recommended level for the general population. If you live north of the 49th parallel in a country with a true winter season, then maintaining your ideal levels of vitamin D in the coldest and darkest months is particularly difficult from food alone.

If you’re athletic, your vitamin D level becomes even more important. Due to their intense training, athletes have a greater need for vitamin D. Intense exercise drives down vitamin D levels, and new research is uncovering how deficiency can lead to reduced muscular power production, V02 max (a measure of peak aerobic fitness), inflammation and recovery. 

Based on the research, you should maintain your levels above 40ng/ml throughout the year if athletic performance is your goal.

The Fix: Add a vitamin D supplement (2,000-4,000 IU daily) to maintain your levels throughout the winter months. If you’re supplementing at the top end of this range, get your levels tested every 8-12 weeks. Also, be sure to include vitamin D-rich foods and Paleo staples like eggs, pork (e.g. bacon), fish, and mushrooms to fight off the seasonal decline of vitamin D.

5. You Don’t Wash Your Hands Enough

We tell our children to wash their hands before they eat, but how many times do you wash yours before you sit down to have your lunch or post-workout snack? We all think we do it, but slacking off in the winter is a sure-fire way to catch that nasty cold going around the office, day-care or gym.

How important is hand washing? The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued repeated suggestions to “avoid shaking hands” for business people throughout the winter to avoid the rapid spread of germs.

The Fix: Like your mom always said, “Wash your hands before you eat!” It’s that simple. (Note – soap and water are just as effective as antimicrobial hand sanitizers.)

6. You Don’t Get to Bed Early Enough

A new study on modern day hunter-gatherer tribes across the globe – the San of southern Africa, the Tsimane in Bolivia and the Hadza in Tanzania – found they sleep an average of 6-7 hours per night, less than the 7.5-8.5 hours of sleep experts generally consider the “sweet spot” for optimal rest and rejuvenation. So, does this mean you don’t really need more sleep?

Not exactly. The answer changes depending on the season. The researchers found that in the shorter, darker days of winter, the tribes went to bed about one hour earlier than during the summer months.

While they did stay up a few hours after sunset, they weren’t exactly “night owls;” their average bedtime was 9:15pm in winter and 10:45pm in summer. The hunter-gatherer tribes were found to wake up at the same time throughout the year. Have trouble sleeping?

Here’s a tip: Leave all electronics — cell-phones, laptops, iPads, etc. — outside of the bedroom to avoid getting distracted and to help you fall asleep faster

For many of us, the winter months leading up to the holiday season are often the busiest months at home and at work. This means later bedtimes and less total sleep. Most people struggle to get bed before midnight (laptops, cell phones and TVs don’t help) and typically don’t get to bed earlier in the colder, darker winter months.

The Fix: Switch off and get to bed earlier in the colder, darker, winter months to prevent illnesses and feel more energized.

Research shows that sleeping less than 5 hours at night equals a 5-fold increased risk of catching a cold or flu, so make sure that, even during busy periods, you aren’t running on empty so you don’t get sick.

Don’t let a few nasty bugs slow you down. Stay ahead of the game! The best way to fight off colds and flu is to not get sick in the first place. These six tips are tried and tested “fixes” to increase your resiliency and keep your immune system strong this fall and winter.

Watch this video – How to NOT Get Sick | Proven Health Hacks | Doctor Mike

Written by Dr. Marc Bubbs

Author Bio:

Dr. Marc Bubbs, ND is a Naturopathic Doctor, Strength Coach, Author, Speaker, and Blogger practicing in Toronto, Canada. He believes that diet, exercise, and lifestyle factors have the most profound impact on your overall health and performance. Marc is the author of The Paleo Project – A 21st Guide to Looking Leaner, Getting Stronger, & Living Longer and currently serves as the Sports Nutrition Lead for Canadian Men’s Olympic Basketball Team.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

How to Use Antiviral Herbs to Naturally Fight Infection?


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

There’s no need to explain the dread and exhaustion that comes with fighting a virus.

Whether it be the common cold or the flu – the nausea, congestion, and other symptoms, can almost be too much to bear.

These symptoms usually result in fleeing to your doctor, in search of a pill, to make it all go away as fast as possible. And while there is definitely a time and place for prescription medications, have you paused for a moment to consider a prescription from nature?

Why Use Herbs to Fight Viruses?

Unlike prescription medicines, whose list of potential side effects are often longer than their list of benefits, antiviral herbs often have little to no side effects. These herbs can be traced back to as early as Ancient Egypt and China, where they were also used as natural remedies.

Many, like licorice root, are also so effective that they are being considered for use as broad-spectrum, non-prescription antivirals.

By sticking with these antiviral herbs, you can stop viruses in their tracks, boost your immune system, and avoid the chemical toxins found in prescription drugs.

Top 10 Antiviral Herbs

1. Oregano

It turns out that this fragrant herb offers far more than a zesty flavor. Oregano, and specifically oregano oil that has been extracted from the plant, contains significant antiviral properties. Studies show its active component, carvacrol, can inactivate viruses like human norovirus (sometimes referred to as the “vomit bug”) within one hour of contact.

Oregano has the power to “inactivate” the human norovirus within an hour of contact.

In addition, Mexican oregano oil has been shown to be effective against viruses like acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 and human respiratory syncytial virus .

Keep in mind, that while it’s great to cook with oregano, you might need to go the oil route to get the most antiviral benefits.

2. Echinacea

Echinacea is one of the most popular antiviral herbs on the market when it comes to fighting viruses and bacteria, and for good reason. Not only does it have the ability to boost your immune system by stimulating the production of cells to help fight infections, but it also contains phytochemicals that fight and help reduce infections once they occur.

3. Garlic

From ancient India to the medieval streets of Europe, garlic has a long history of use when it comes to infections. Some of these uses included using garlic as a treatment for leprosy, parasitic infections, and as an antibiotic for infectious diseases.

Today, garlic’s reputation as a potent antimicrobial is well-known. Studies have shown that it has the ability to combat the flu virus, the common head cold virus, HIV, and pneumonia, to name a few.

4. Elderberry

If you’re suffering from the flu, elderberry should be your go-to for relief. Studies have shown that people infected with influenza virus A and B experience 91 percent improvement after taking elderberry for seven days, while also reducing their fevers and increasing their feelings of improvement.

If you’ve got the flu, reach for some elderberry. It’ll boost your immune system while eradicating the virus.

Elderberry is commonly taken alongside echinacea to boost your immune system, while at the same time eradicating the flu virus.

5. Astragalus Root

Astragalus root is more well-known as an adaptogen herb whose role is to help improve your body’s reaction to stress. However, research has shown this root also contains powerful antiviral properties.

One study revealed that astragalus root is effective at inhibiting the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), while another showed that it inhibits RNA replication in some virus strains.

In simple terms, astragalus root could be your best friend whenever you’re looking to stop a virus from multiplying and getting worse.

6. Olive Leaf

Olive leaf, which indeed hails from the olive tree, is another fantastic antiviral. It’s main compound, oleuropein, has been shown to inhibit the spreading of viruses by not allowing them to attach to healthy cells.

In addition, studies have shown that exposing certain viruses to oleuropein in their early stages reduced their infection potential by 10 to 30 percent.

Other studies have even shown that olive leaf can inhibit certain antiviral effects on HIV by inhibiting replication.

7. Ginger

Not only is ginger an excellent remedy for the nausea and stomach upset you might feel when fighting a virus, but it also wages war against the virus itself. It does this by blocking the attachment of viruses to areas that are commonly infected first, like your airways.

Keep in mind that many of the studies showing ginger’s effectiveness use fresh ginger rather than dried.

8. Licorice Root

Licorice root has been used for centuries in Traditional Chinese Medicine for its antiviral effects. Modern studies have caught up, and now conclude that compounds in the root called triterpenoids are extremely effective when it comes to viral immunity.

It has been shown to have antiviral effects against viruses like the herpes virus, SARS, HIV, and influenza, and is being recognized as a potential broad-spectrum antiviral.

9. Cat’s Claw

Cat’s claw, hailing from a woody vine in the Amazon rainforest, is another herb with spectacular antiviral properties. Specifically, cat’s claw works to supercharge your immune system, while simultaneously repairing damaged DNA and boosting your virus-fighting white blood cells.

10. Calendula

Calendula, also called pot marigold, is mainly used throughout the Western world as an ornamental plant. However, calendula’s flowers have been shown to fight viruses like rhinovirus and vesicular stomatitis by reducing their multiplication.

Calendula, aka pot marigold, is more than just a pretty flower. It can heal infections, ulcers and ear infections!

Calendula is also recognized as a cleansing herb that helps treat chronic infections and reduces inflammation, as well as helping heal ulcers and eradicate ear infections.

How to Use Antiviral Herbs

Teas

Try steeping any of these antiviral herbs into a tea. Add 1 tablespoon of your favorite herb to 1 cup of hot water, and let it steep for 10 to 15 minutes. To naturally sweeten your tea and boost its nourishing properties, add a bit of honey (we like to use 100% raw honey by Beekeeper’s Naturals).

Alternatively, you can purchase pre-packaged teas such as ginger, licorice, or elderberry.

Oils

Combine 1 to 2 drops of antiviral essential oils with a carrier oil (like coconut oil or jojoba oil), and rub them onto your chest or feet, or add 2 to 3 drops to a warm bath.

Diffusers and Steams

Another way to use antiviral herbs, in their essential oil form, is to add around 7 drops to an essential oil diffuser, if you have one.

Alternatively, you can make an antiviral steam treatment by adding an oil to just-boiled water and inhaling the steam. This method is great for head colds and upper respiratory viruses.

Supplements

If you’re short on time, purchasing these antiviral herbs in supplement form might be your next best option. Many of these can be found in your local heath food shop in standalone capsules, or in combination as part of an antiviral blend.

Recipes

Try upping the amount of garlic and oregano in your recipes when you’re suffering from a virus. Roast garlic in the oven with chicken and veggies, add sautéed garlic and oregano to eggs for a Mediterranean twist, or add chopped garlic and oregano to spaghetti squash “pasta.” Or make a batch of these easy, slow-cooker garlic and oregano mushrooms!

Dosages

While it may be tempting to down as many antiviral herbs as you can to get rid of your virus, keep in mind that while most have little to no negative side effects to date, that doesn’t mean that you should take an unreasonable amount. Use them, but avoid going overboard. And as always, consult with your doctor first, especially if you are pregnant or taking other medications.

Watch this video – 5 Herbs to Boost Your Immune System and Kill Viruses Naturally

Written by Megan Patiry

Author Bio:

Megan is an inquisitive nutrition and wellness writer harboring an editorial love affair with the decadent and the nutritious. She is a dedicated researcher in all areas of ancestral health, a certified specialist in fitness nutrition, personal trainer, and professional almond milk latte addict.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

Natural Pain Relief – 9 Foods That Work Better Than Aspirin


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

There are 100 million Americans living with chronic pain. Chronic pain can happen as the result of autoimmune disease, side effects of an injury, or many other reasons that aren’t as easily identified.

The downside to addressing pain with prescriptions or OTC pain relievers is that they don’t address the cause, and they often come with a hefty serving of side effects, some of which can be long lasting.

Nature has its own pain medicine in the form of food and in cases of chronic pain, turning to diet and lifestyle to help mediate symptoms can be effective, reduce inflammation, and create long-lasting relief.

9 Foods That Work Better Than Aspirin

These nine foods have been researched and proven to help correct the mechanisms within the body that can contribute to long-term and chronic pain problems. Eating them regularly can help lead to lasting relief.

1. Cherries

Well known for their anti-inflammatory health benefits, cherries are rich in antioxidants and anthocyanins, which give the cherries their deep color and can help to reduce pain-causing mechanisms in the body, not to mention the ability to reduce cancer-causing activities in cells and oxidative damage to the cardiovascular system.

While NSAIDs are often taken for pain and inflammation, tart cherries are similarly effective at producing the same effect with both acute and chronic pain, and they don’t come with any OTC side effects, like stomach bleeding risks or ulcers.

For the best pain relief results, cherries should be eaten daily, with two servings being the best amount to provide noticeable relief and reduced inflammatory markers.

Even those who experience chronic pain from intense physical exercise, such as marathon running, can benefit from drinking tart cherry juice for a week before a big event, during, and then after.

2. Garlic

The sulfur compounds in garlic make it a potent health food, beneficial not only for pain relief (like arthritis), but also for immunity, digestion, and reducing the risk of certain kinds of cancer.

While garlic in its raw form may be unappetizing, garlic can be eaten in many ways. To work it into a diet regularly, add roasted garlic to meat and vegetable dishes.

Peeling and chopping raw garlic might not seem like a fun task, but you can get an equal amount of flavor and benefit from it if you peel and quarter.

Eating roasted garlic pieces when they’re soft and roasted can be as tasty as any other roasted vegetable, and can produce some potent anti-inflammatory responses within the body. Try to work garlic in daily for maximum effects.

3. Healthy Fats

We all know that healthy fats such as olive oil and omega-3 fatty acids (e.g., in salmon) are good for us. Specifically, they can cut inflammation in the body that can lead to chronic pain conditions or other diseases and disorders.

Regular intake of omega-3s can result in equivalent pain-relieving effects when compared with NSAIDs like ibuprofen.

Regular intake of omega-3s can result in equivalent pain-relieving effects when compared with NSAIDs like ibuprofen – without any potentially damaging side effects. Even severe chronic conditions, like rheumatoid arthritis, respond to the pain relieving effects of omega-3 fatty acids.

Beyond that, a proper balance of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids can lead to better overall health, reduced risk of blood pressure problems, and an overall decreased cancer risk.

4. Leafy Greens

Eating greens is often synonymous with health, but their benefits extend well beyond weight loss, detox, and reduced cancer risk. A high daily intake of both vegetables and fruits can lead to the prevention of pain-associated diseases and disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis.

A high daily intake of both vegetables and fruits can lead to the prevention of pain-associated diseases and disorders.

While there are mixed answers on how many servings of leafy greens one should eat each day for preventive effects, an overall eight to ten servings of vegetables and fruits daily is recommended for the best results. Of those, perhaps two to three servings of vegetables should be leafy greens.

Leafy greens are rich in quercetin, a type of flavonoid that is responsible for broad anti-inflammatory benefits, as well as vitamin C, vitamin K, and essential minerals like magnesium.

5. Turmeric

Curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, can help to reduce the inflammation associated with chronic disorders, like rheumatoid arthritis. It can also help to reduce inflammation, swelling, and pain after surgery.

Turmeric can be consumed in a variety of forms, including as a spice added to foods or drinks and encapsulated for those who are not tolerant of the signature spicy taste. Two to three teaspoons of turmeric daily can help to provide therapeutic levels of relief and preventive benefits with little side effects.

Note: Turmeric absorbs best when taken in combination with black pepper (approximately 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper for every 1 teaspoon of turmeric).

The only caution is that individuals also taking blood thinners should check with their doctors before adding turmeric to their diet.

6. Ginger

Ginger is in the same family of anti-inflammatory spices as turmeric. While they share similar benefits, ginger is well known for its ability to relieve nausea associated with pregnancy and cancer treatments. It can also relieve pain in the same category as NSAIDs, making it another effective alternative to over-the-counter medications that have unpleasant side effects.

Ginger is well known for its ability to relieve nausea associated with pregnancy and cancer treatments.

Ginger is also effective at relieving long-term pain associated with chronic inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis.

Ginger can be eaten raw or pickled, grated or brewed into tea, added as a spice to dishes, or encapsulated.

Ginger tea or capsules seem to be the most efficient way to regularly consume it. You can drink up to four cups of tea daily, and capsules should follow daily recommendations or what practitioners suggest.

Similar to turmeric, those on blood thinners should consult their doctors before adding daily ginger to their diet.

7. Cinnamon

Cinnamon is a popular natural remedy for helping to control blood sugar, but it can also keep inflammation levels low in the body and improve digestion. Spices have long been used for medicinal purposes, but in a modern day where pharmaceutical options abound, it is rarer to use food as medicine.

Still, cinnamon and other spices can have broad anti-inflammatory benefits and in many cases, can be equally as effective to (or more) than NSAIDs, whether over-the-counter or prescription.

For cinnamon to be used in the diet to reduce pain, it should be in powdered form, and should be the Ceylon variety, not cassia. Cassia is the most common form and is less expensive, but toxicity can be of concern when cassia is consumed in large quantities.

Ceylon cinnamon presents no toxicity risks and has more potent health benefits.  Ceylon cinnamon is the preferred supplemental form, and for best results, one should take approximately 1-2 teaspoons per day.

8. Bone Broth

Whether the pain that someone experiences is activity related, leftover from an old injury, or due to a chronic inflammatory condition, bone broth in the diet can help to reduce chronic pain and flares.

This is due to the presence of collagen in bone broth, which can help to alleviate joint problems and repair pain that originates from the digestive tract.

Inflammatory disorders specifically respond well to the natural collagen-containing gelatin that is found in true bone broth.

Bone broth and meat stock are different, since bone broth extracts nutrients from the bones, such as gelatin, minerals, and amino acids, whereas stock only contains nutrients from the meat. While both can be healthy, stock contains no pain-relieving properties.

Bone broth can safely be consumed daily in large quantities. Since it is a whole food that contains protein, some healthy fat, and plenty of naturally occurring nutrients, it can be used in cooking dishes like soups or stews or can be taken on its own as a beverage or a snack.

9. Cruciferous Vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage have several health benefits. They naturally support detox organs like the liver and kidneys, and they contain plenty of natural fiber, folate, and vitamin C.

But they can also help to regulate inflammatory bacteria within the digestive tract, especially H. pylori, which is implicated in ulcers and other chronic digestive conditions.

Since the body obtains all of its nutrients via digestion, an inflamed digestive system will contribute to inflammation throughout the rest of the body. Eating cruciferous vegetables daily can help to promote the healthy elimination of toxins as well as the proper regulation of the digestive system.

3 Pain-Relieving Lifestyle Factors

While diet can go a long way in addressing chronic pain, fighting it naturally with a one-two punch of diet and lifestyle can help to bring faster relief and longer lasting results.

1. Yoga

Well-known for its stress-relieving benefits, yoga can also help to relieve tissue stress that can lead to pain. It is effective for chronic problems like rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia, and also from pain associated with pregnancy, athletic injuries, and thyroid problems.

Yoga can effectively reduce inflammatory markers within the body, proving that its calming effects go well beyond mindfulness and anxiety relief.

To gain benefits of yoga, you can successfully achieve poses and health benefits from the comfort of your own home or take a class. If practicing at home, all you need is a yoga mat (or a soft surface like a carpet) and an online program or a sequence of poses you can follow.

2. Acupuncture

Acupuncture can provide pain relief that clinically compares to other methods. When patients get regular treatments, it can improve mobility and reduce pain, as well as relieving other issues often associated with chronic pain, such as depression, anxiety, and insomnia.

Acupuncture can even provide relief in chronic pain disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. When paired with a pain-relieving diet, acupuncture can have long-lasting results and can dramatically improve quality of life.

3. Massage

Similar to both yoga and acupuncture, regular massage treatments by a qualified expert can help to alleviate chronic pain, particularly the type brought on by arthritis, fibromyalgia, and other inflammatory pain conditions. Massage can even reduce pain associated with cancer treatments.

When finding a massage therapist, ensure that they have proper certification and are familiar with massage for pain relief. An unqualified massage therapist could worsen muscular or joint pain.

Watch this video – Top 10 Natural Pain Killers

Written by Aimee McNew

Author Bio:

Aimee McNew is a Certified Nutritionist who specializes in women’s health, thyroid problems, infertility, and digestive wellness. She ate her way back to health using a Paleo diet, lost 80 pounds, and had a healthy baby after numerous miscarriages. She focuses on simple nutrition practices that promote long-lasting results.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

5-Minute Guided Meditation for People Who Have Chronic Insomnia


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

It’s the middle of the night and you’re awake. Tossing and turning, weary eyes staring out into the dark room. This isn’t the first night you haven’t been able to sleep, and (unfortunately) you’re sure that it won’t be the last.

If insomnia is a word you know all too well, then this post is for you. Read on to find out what may be getting in the way of your sleep, and follow the steps listed below, on our relaxing guided meditation (for when counting sheep doesn’t work).

What Causes Insomnia?

Insomnia is the inability to sleep, having difficulty either falling or staying asleep. If you experience insomnia, you’re not alone: 30 percent of U.S. adults suffer symptoms of insomnia. While many people experience a poor night’s sleep from time to time, recurring sleeplessness becomes a real problem for your physical, emotional and mental health.

Poor Sleep Habits

This includes not having an established sleeping routine or lacking ideal sleep conditions. Your body likes consistency, especially when it comes to sleep.

Being erratic about when you go to bed and wake up can confuse your circadian rhythm, which means that your body doesn’t know when it should be asleep or awake.

Trying to sleep in a light, noisy room, or on an uncomfortable mattress, will also impact the quality of your shut eye.

The fix: Stick to having a consistent wake-up time every single day, even on weekends

Anxiety or Depression

You may be familiar with that feeling of being extremely tired, only to go to bed and have your mind light up with worry. Unfortunately, it’s quite natural for your mind to wander when your body is resting – you have no other distractions, after all.

The fix: Having quiet time earlier in the day allows your mind to analyze these thoughts before you go to bed. Activities such as journaling or meditation can help you sort out confusing thoughts and help you rest easier when it’s time to sleep.

Lack of Exercise

As a reader of PaleoHacks, chances are that know just how important exercise is for the body and mind. And when it comes to sleep, science is a big fan of that daily workout to reduce symptoms of insomnia. On the flip side, over-exercising, or doing high intensity exercise too close to bedtime, can have a negative effect on your sleep, so keep the HIIT workouts for earlier in the day.

The fix: Make a commitment to move your body every day. This will boost energy during waking hours and help you physically feel the need to sleep.

Physical Ailments or Chronic Illness

Being uncomfortable in your body, or battling an illness, makes it very challenging to sleep peacefully through the night.

The fix: While this can be hard to work around, lifestyle habits may help to improve your condition and aid your sleep. Stretching or foam rolling and other mobility exercises can help release chronic muscle pain that may be keeping you up at night.

Combine this with following an anti-inflammatory diet to help heal you from the inside out.

Medications

Some medications also impact the quality of your sleep, disturbing your body’s natural clockwork.

The fix: If you feel your medication is affecting your sleep, discuss this with your primary care physician. They may be able to recommend an alternative brand that’s more natural, a different dosage, or have you take it at a different time of day.

How Insomnia Impacts Your Health

Muscle growth, cell and tissue repair, and detoxification are processes that happen during sleep. Without enough sleep, this regeneration process is disrupted, which can wreak havoc on your physical body, your hormones and your mood.

Sleep deprivation is linked to excess fat storage and increased hunger and decreased metabolic rate, and it can raise your risk for chronic health problems.

Sleep is also the time that the brain is getting a cognitive reboot, with neural pathways forming that will improve your ability to learn and remember new information.

Studies also link lack of sleep with anxiety, depression, and even an increase in suicidal thoughts. Sleep deprivation is linked to excess fat storage, increased hunger, decreased metabolic rate. It can raise risk for chronic health problems.

As you can see, not spending quality time sleeping has far more serious consequences than yawning in that 3pm meeting. But saying that you’ll “get more sleep” might not be enough, especially if it’s the act of sleeping, not the routine of going to bed, that you’re struggling with.

The guided meditation below is one that I’ve found great success with for myself, my clients and my Pilates groups. It uses a mindfulness-based technique to relax your body and your mind, and creates a good physical environment for rest.

In fact, a study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine links mindfulness meditation with reduced insomnia and fatigue, so let’s give it a try.

A 5-Minute Guided Meditation for Healthy Sleep

You can complete this exercise when you go the bed, or to relax any time of day.

Start by lying comfortably on your back and closing your eyes.

Take a deep breath in through the nose, and exhale through the nose (nose breathing activates the parasympathetic nervous system, which calms your body).

Breathing softly, you’re going to move your attention through each body part. As you think of that body part, you’ll feel it relax. Allow it to rest heavy against your mattress or the floor where you’re lying.

Starting with your left big toe, think about the toe, soften the toe, let it relax.

Now focus on the left second toe, feel it relax.

In your mind’s eye, continue to work through your body in the following order:

Left Foot: third toe, fourth toe, baby toe, all toes, left ball of the foot, whole left foot, left ankle

Left Leg: calf, shin, knee, back of thigh, front of thigh, inner thigh, left hip

Right Foot: big toe, second toe, third toe, fourth toe, baby toe, all toes, right ball of the foot, whole right foot, right ankle

Right Leg: calf, shin, knee, back of thigh, front of thigh, inner thigh, right hip

Pelvis + Lumbar: front of pelvis, right buttocks, left buttocks, right side low back, left side low back, whole low back

Ribs, Shoulders + Arms: back of right waist, back of right ribcage, right shoulder blade, right shoulder, right upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, right thumb, first finger, second finger, ring finger, little finger, whole right hand; repeat on the left side

Stomach, Chest + Head: stomach, right side chest, left side chest, whole chest, throat, jaw, lips, eyes, eyebrows, forehead, crown of head, back of head, back of neck

Whole Body: whole right body, whole left body, whole back body, whole front body, whole body

Sending your breath to your whole body, feel it relax even more, feel it lying heavy, so heavy as if it could melt through the floor, softly, gently, calmly. In that relaxed state, stay and rest.

Watch this video – Fall Asleep Fast Deep Sleep Meditation for Insomnia / Mindful Movement

Written by Jennifer Dene

Author Bio:

Jennifer Dene is a celebrity trainer, health coach, and owner of Jennifer Dene Wellness.. She is also the creator of the lifestyle program The Dene Method, and host of the Soulful Self Love Challenge, which helps hundreds of women around the world feel fit, feminine and fabulous.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.

To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

Stress Management – How to Reduce Stress with Mindfulness Meditation?


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Trying to stay cool as a cucumber? This mindfulness meditation will keep your jets cool the next time something really fuels your fire.

Handling stress is a skill that can be extremely beneficial to your road to happiness.

From the minute your alarm wakes you up, to the second you lose consciousness right back in your bed, your mind is wandering through a myriad of emotions which lay down the framework for your habitual feelings, actions, and thoughts.

These emotions may catch you off guard or be under your control, depending on which side of the bed you woke up on that day (or if you’ve already had your coffee).

One of the best ways to manage not only stress, but also anxiety, panic, depression, obsessive thinking, and strong emotional reactivity is to practice “Mindfulness Meditation” or “Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction.”

A Guide to Mindful Meditation

Trying to stay cool as a cucumber this summer? This hack will keep your jets cool the next time something really fuels your fire. Don’t let life drag you down, and try to stay away from immediately turning to medicine to deal with life’s stressful times (i.e. antidepressants, opiates, sleeping pills, etc.). Taking the monkey off your back is not as impossible as it seems.

Mindfulness Meditation has been proven clinically effective since 1967, and the best part about it is that it can cost the magical number “free.”

Practicing mindfulness is bringing your awareness to the present moment without judgement of your own inner voice or your emotions. Try to steer clear of putting a “right” or “wrong” label on any train of thought or feeling at any given moment.

Instead, bring your attention to the present time, peacefully part ways with your past, and seize your future.

Your Mindfulness Meditation doesn’t have to be super traditional with mala beads, singing bowls, and/or cushions; it just has to be focused.

Though these are wonderful props which may help guide your meditation practice, what’s more important is paying attention to your bodily sensations, thoughts, emotions, and external sensations from your environment with acceptance, compassion, and patience. The more your practice, the easier it will become.

Here are some helpful guidelines to keep in mind while you practice cultivating mindfulness:

1. Posture

Maintaining good posture is a key to successful mindfulness. The right posture can improve blood flow throughout the body, as well as energy flow – together, these influence your thoughts and emotions.

The influence goes both ways, though; negative thoughts tend to leave you hunching your shoulders inward. Poor posture is also known to leave your neck and head feeling achy and may even result in headaches.

Spend some time adjusting to your ideal posture. Make sure that your spine is stacked, and your hips are level with each other. Imagine yourself lifting the crown of your head up to the sky. Shoulders should be lifting back and down the back of your spine.

2. Breath

Concentration on the breath may be one of your best tools to enhance your Mindfulness Meditation practice. Deeper breaths will help you mentally establish your presence in your meditation space.

Establishing presence means being cognizant of what is happening in the “here” and “now.” Especially pay attention to your breath as you are riding any intense emotional roller coasters, this will help you stay calm and carry on.

3. Surrounding Environment

If you have never heard that you are a product of your environment, now you have. Observing your senses and your surroundings without letting them slip past your conscious thought allows your mind to be at peace in the present moment.

Focus not only on what you can see, but also what you can hear, smell, feel, and even taste. Observing your physical senses in any given environment can improve your decision-making skills.

4. This Too Shall Pass

Your ability to free your mind from taking a ride on the negative side will strengthen as you train yourself to recognize that who you are as a person is not defined by what you think and feel. Experiences in life are ephemeral, or short-lived.

Mindfulness meditation has several physical benefits to your health including:

  • Lowers your blood pressure and your blood pressure reactivity to stress
  • Improves overall mood
  • Reduces cortisol in your blood, a significant hormone involved in stress control
  • Fights obesity: by practicing Mindful Meditation you can discipline yourself to practice mindful eating.

Cortisol from stress damages brain structure and connectivity. Your brain is your control center. Think of the effect of chronic stress on the brain like leaving your cell phone in the rain.

If it’s just sprinkling out, it’s probably not a big deal for a few minutes, but leave it outside while it’s pouring buckets of rain for an hour, and you’re going to need a new selfie device. In a similar fashion, excess and chronic stress will slowly influence malfunctions in your body’s communication with itself.

Mindfulness is a total game changer when it comes to anxiety and depression because it literally changes our brains physiologically. Studies have found that after practicing Mindfulness Meditation, the density of grey matter in the brain will increase in regions linked to emotion, empathy, memory, learning and regulation.

It even changes the game of relationships. Couples were observed to be more satisfied with their relationships, closer to one another, and more optimistic, accepting, and relaxed when they had practiced mindfulness.

Try combining mindfulness with your other meditation practices. Don’t know how to meditate, or would like some tips? Here’s an easy 10-Minute Meditation you can do almost anywhere. Just remember to use Mindful Meditation to help anchor both your mind and body, while also adding depth to your practice.

Watch this video – Release Anxiety Stress & Overthinking Guided Meditation 10 Minutes

Written by Liz Lang

Author Bio:

Liz Lang is a Clinical Research Coordinator with the Southern California Institute for Research and Education in the field of Gastroenterology. Liz graduated from the University of California, Irvine with a degree in Public Health Sciences. She has an insatiable thirst to learn how the human body works in order to keep people healthy. When Liz isn’t in the clinic, she enjoys exploring nature, yoga, and trying new things (especially food!).

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

How to Practice Meditation for Natural Migraine Pain Relief?


Click HERE to Discover these 80 Keto-Friendly and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes

Calming Meditation for Natural Migraine Relief

If you suffer from throbbing migraines, try this mindfulness meditation that guides you through a full body scan and cleansing breaths to help you release your pain.

With the fast-paced world we live in, it’s no wonder that many of us are chronically stressed out. Even worse, the tension and anxiety that often come along with it can turn into an excruciating migraine. Ouch.

A migraine is a chronic disorder that requires long-term management and preventative strategies. While those strategies typically consist of anti-nausea drugs and pain relievers, meditation could offer a more natural approach to dealing with these debilitating headaches.

Migraine symptoms include pounding headaches, nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light. Sufferers typically report throbbing pain on one side of the head as well. No one knows exactly what causes migraines, but different migraine triggers include changes in weather, changes in sleep, certain foods or drinks, caffeine, anxiety, and stress.

Meditation can help with migraines in a few different ways:

  • Eases stress, anxiety, depression, and insomnia: Meditation is a quick and portable way to help reduce pain and emotional tension and is an effective alternative to pharmaceuticals.
  • Aides in pain management: Mindfulness meditation reduces migraine symptoms by directing attention to sensory events, engaging the mechanisms that support the cognitive control of pain.

Mindfulness Meditation for Migraines

Mindfulness meditation can reduce chronic pain by over 50 percent. This is because mindfulness soothes the brain patterns of underlying pain. Eventually these changes can take root and alter the structure of the brain itself, so that patients no longer feel pain with the same intensity.

Use this mindfulness meditation to let go of your pain by becoming aware of it from an outside perspective.

Step 1: Begin by taking a comfortable seat. Place your palms face down on your thighs and sit up tall. Relax your shoulders and the muscles of your face.

Step 2: Take three deep, cleansing breaths, inhaling through your nose and exhaling through your mouth. Then, find a more natural breath in and out of the nose, and close your eyes.

Step 3: Begin to identify the source of the pain (head, neck, eyes, temples). Then, see if you can move through that pain and tension. Wherever you feel pain, accept it, sit with it, and let the body relax around the pain.

Step 4: Now, do a slow scan from the crown of your head to your shoulders. Notice and feel any pain, tension, and sensation as you go through. Whenever you observe pain, practice moving into it, sitting with it, and accepting it.

Make sure to pay attention to these particular areas:

  • Crown of the head
  • Forehead
  • Eyes: Start with the right eye, including the eyelid, eyeball, then behind the eyeball. Repeat on the left eye. Then feel both eyes, scanning the entire eye area and noticing all sensations.
  • Temples: Feel the right side, then the left.
  • Jaw: Feel the right side and then the left. Let your jaw soften.
  • Mouth: Start with your tongue, the top and bottom of your mouth, and the teeth.
  • Ears: Feel behind and underneath the earlobes, then the inside of the ears.
  • Neck: Start at the base of your neck and then move upwards.
  • Entire head: Start at the base of your scalp, up and around the back of the head, and back up to the crown.

Step 5: Bring awareness back to the entirety of the head, neck, and shoulders, noticing any differences in pain. Send yourself love and gratitude. Take a deep, cleansing breath, then slowly open your eyes.

Watch this video – Migraine and Headache Relief: Guided Meditation to Relieve Pain

Written by Kelly Collins

Author Bio:

Kelly is a certified Personal Trainer with NASM, a Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga Teacher, and has her B.S. in Kinesiology from San Diego State University. She is co-owner of Roaming Yogi Adventures, a yoga and adventure-based retreat. She believes that having fun and well-rounded exercise is the key to maximizing strength, flexibility, and mental health.

A lot of people have gotten results from the Keto diet, and enjoyed the foods that it has to offer. However, many of the people who are following this diet have a hard time finding the recipes that they need, especially ones that are quick and easy to complete.

Fortunately, Kelsey Ale, noticed this problem, and decided to do something about it. She’s found that making recipes in a slow cooker gives you meals which are not only delicious, but also take very little time to make. Mostly you just put a few simple ingredients in the slow cooker, and let it do the rest.To find out more, click on – Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook

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