What Are the Side Effects of Tonsil Stones?

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Your palatine tonsils are a pair of gland-like lymphatic structures that are positioned on either side of the back of your throat.

 

This strategic placement allows the tonsils to protect the body from foreign pathogens that could enter the throat and lead to harmful effects for the immune system, the respiratory tract, or the gastrointestinal tract.

 

If your tonsils sense that foreign substances are present in the back of your throat, they will stimulate a localized immune response to combat any potential infection.

 

To trap harmful materials, the tonsils function like nets by snagging incoming particles in small channel and pits along their surfaces, which are called the tonsillar crypts. Additionally, the tonsils filter lymphatic fluid.

 

However, the tonsils tend to retain bits of matter without always discriminating between harmful and benign particles. As a result, excessive debris can accumulate on the surface of the tonsils, combine with lymphatic fluid, and settle into deep recesses of the tonsillar crypts.

 

If this situation persists, the debris attracts bacteria and other pathogens, which then calcify into hard, pale tonsil stones.

 

Tonsil stones can lead to multiple negative effects, although the exact symptoms vary between patients because of their individual tonsillar characteristics and personal health conditions.

 

Some common side effects of tonsil stones include bad breath, earaches, visible white spots on the tonsils, and an unpleasant metallic taste in the mouth.

 

This condition also affects the immune system by contributing to tonsillar swelling, which can impair the tonsils’ local immune function. As collected debris hardens into tonsil stones in the tonsillar crypts, inflammation from infection or from pressure can prompt your tonsils to become enlarged and inflamed.

 

Additionally, tonsil stones can also affect the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, as accumulated material can prompt coughing fits, impaired swallowing, or the sensation that something is lodged near your airway.

 

Although these symptoms have been noted in some individuals with tonsil stones, not everyone who develops this condition will manifest symptoms.

 

Often, people are unaware that they have tonsil stones until their family doctor discovers the condition incidentally. They are therefore unlikely to experience the side effects of tonsil stones.

 

Those who have large or solidified tonsil stones, however, are more likely to experience the side effects of tonsil stones and seek treatment.

 

For more information about the side effects of tonsil stones, watch this Video – What are the Symptoms of Tonsil Stones

This article is based on the book, “Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever” by Alison White, an ex-sufferer of tonsilloliths, also known as tonsil stones.

 

Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever is a guidebook that teaches you everything you need to know to get rid of painful, pesky and inconvenient tonsil stones without surgery.

 

This is a 7-day schedule to get rid of tonsil stones using natural remedies that are tried, tested and proven to work. If you are ready to take control of your health and to make the right decision regarding your tonsil stones, then click on Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever.

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6 Skincare Routine Tips for Cooler Temperatures

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While not everyone has to change up their skincare routine with the changing of seasons, many people should—and they don’t even realize it.

 

“Patients with extreme skin types—dry, sensitive skin, or very oily skin—may need to change their regimens in summer and winter for better maintenance,” board-certified dermatologist Rhonda Klein M.D./M.P.H. tells More.

 

If the change in temperatures is causing your skin to react (i.e. dryness, redness, irritation, scaliness, or excess oil), you might want to consider revamping your current routine.

 

But, before you freak out over how much that could cost, we’re not talking a total overhaul. Tweak a few crucial products to prepare your skin for the change and to do some extra summer sun skin clean-up!

 

Skincare Routine Tips #1- Put Down the Heavy-Duty Facial Cleanser

 

If you only make one change to your seasonal skincare routine make it this: Switch out your face wash. Put down the heavy-duty foaming cleanser and opt for a creamy one, instead. This simple swap often can be all it takes to help skin adjust to decreased humidity and cooler temperatures.

 

In addition, avoid cleansing your skin too regularly as that can also strip its natural moisturizers and cause your skin to either start to flake or overproduce oil, causing unnecessary breakouts.

 

Skincare Routine Tips #2 – Switch from Lotion-Based Moisturizer to A Cream

 

In general, creams tend to hydrate your skin better than lotion-based moisturizer you use in the summer. Lightweight lotions are a combination of oil and water, but they have a much higher water percentage and are more easily absorbed into the skin.

 

Creams, however, are also a blend of oil and water, but have much greater amounts of oil than lotions, making them heavier, richer, and thicker in consistency. The oil in creams form a physical barrier to trap moisture inside the skin, which can be especially important in the colder months.

 

And just because it feels like the sun forgot about you in the colder weather doesn’t mean that those UV rays aren’t still around to damage your skin.

 

If you’re in a geographical location that gets cold enough, the snow-covered ground can even increase your UV radiation exposure by reflecting the rays back toward you. Make sure to choose a cream that still contains SPF to ensure that you don’t forget to stay protected all day long.

 

Skincare Routine Tips #3 – Exfoliate Semi-Regularly

 

Over-exfoliating your skin (especially during the colder months) can cause excessive dryness. However, make sure to keep an exfoliator in your routine one to two times each week to slough away those dry, dead skin cells and reveal bright skin even in the dead of winter.

 

Skincare Routine Tips #4 – Cut Down On Shower Time and Temperature

 

While cooler weather might sound like the perfect time for a long, hot bath, try to fight the urge. Prolonged contact with hot water can strip the skin of its natural moisturize, leaving you even drier than you were before.

 

Skincare Routine Tips #5 – Layer Your Skincare Products

 

Trap the moisture in your skin by layering your winter skincare products. Use items like skin boosters, oils, mists, and moisturizers one after the other if you need a little extra help fighting dryness.

 

Klein typically recommends applying an antioxidant serum and moisturizer in the morning and using those skin barrier products, ceramides (ingredients that restore hydration to skin), and night creams in the evening. During the cooler temperatures, she has her clients using eye cream twice a day to really boost hydration.

 

Skincare Routine Tips #6 – Decrease Use of Retinol-Based Products

 

In the world of skincare, retinols are powerful exfoliants that help the skin to shed dead skin cells and in turn, reveal healthier cells underneath. Products with retinols in them can also reverse sun and environmental damage and help treat acne.

 

Sounds almost perfect, doesn’t it? When the seasons change, though, these ingredients can actually strip your face of moisture, depending on your skin type.

 

“Patients with acne-prone or oily skin will often tolerate … stronger retinol products,” Klein tells More. However, if you find your skin leans toward being dry or combination-like, give it a break from these products in the fall and winter.

 

Watch the following Videos for more skincare routine tips for cooler temperatures

 

Winter Morning Skincare Routine

Winter Night-Time Routine | Zoella

DIY Everyday SKIN CARE ROUTINE: Autumn Winter Edition I NATURAL & ORGANIC I

 

Summer To Fall Evening Skincare Routine 2017 | LookMazing

For more ideas to look younger, look no further than Wendy Wilken’s Facelift Without Surgery Program. From this program, you will learn

 

  • How to eliminate wrinkles on the face and neck: Forehead lines, eye wrinkles and crow’s feet, smile and laugh folds, nasal lines, fine lines around the mouth and lips, neck wrinkles and creases.
  • Easy facial yoga routines for tightening and lifting sagging face and neck skin
  • Methods to treat unsightly eye bags, dark eye circles and “racoon” rings.
  • How to use yoga to re-sculpture and sharpen the features of your face and neck for a new and better looking

 

To find out more, CLICK HERE

How to do Easy Throat Examination to Detect Tonsil Stones

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Tonsil stones, also known as tonsilloliths, are caused by the accumulation of debris in the crevices of your palatine tonsils. These lymphatic organs are located on either side of the back of your throat. If you suspect that you may have tonsil stones, you can perform a simple at-home throat examination with a few supplies.

 

Each tonsil has a covering of pink mucosa that is lined with a system of channels and pits called the tonsillar crypts. When bits of debris such as food particles, dead cells, and microorganisms become lodged in these crypts, the resulting accumulation can combine with mucus and begin to decay. The decaying material then calcifies into small, hard pellets in the tonsillar crypts.

 

If you suspect that you may have tonsil stones, you can conduct a simple throat examination at home. Using a mirror and a flashlight can allow you to inspect each of your palatine tonsils for any obvious white spots or flecks that would indicate tonsil-stone formation.

 

Take a clean cotton swab and pull back the flaps of your tonsils to inspect them more thoroughly. Be careful when performing this DIY throat examination, as you may trigger your gag reflex or poke sensitive tissue accidentally.

 

Although this DIY throat examination can be helpful in identifying obvious tonsil stones, the only definitive way to determine whether you have tonsil stones is via imaging such as a CT scan or an X-ray, as these methods can indicate the presence of stones that may not be visible otherwise.

 

Most individuals who develop tonsil stones do not experience noticeable symptoms, as the majority of tonsil stones are small and not problematic.

 

Some patients, however, may suffer from large, more-solidified tonsilloliths that cause bothersome symptoms such as a chronic sore throat, earaches, difficulty swallowing, and persistent bad breath. This form of large tonsil stones is rare but can be very uncomfortable.

 

If your tonsil stones are bothersome or are giving you reason for concern, you may need to see your family doctor. He or she can help dislodge any visible tonsil stones and can suggest helpful at-home remedies to reduce your symptoms.

 

Alternatively, troublesome tonsilloliths that are not easily removed may require a visit to an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist for further evaluation and possible surgery.

 

Watch this Video – Change Your Diet to Get Rid of Tonsil Stones for Good

This article is based on the book, “Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever” by Alison White, an ex-sufferer of tonsilloliths, also known as tonsil stones.

 

Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever is a guidebook that teaches you everything you need to know to get rid of painful, pesky and inconvenient tonsil stones without surgery.

 

This is a 7-day schedule to get rid of tonsil stones using natural remedies that are tried, tested and proven to work. If you are ready to take control of your health and to make the right decision regarding your tonsil stones, then click on Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever.

What are the Common Causes of Tonsil Stones?

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The number of adults with tonsil stones is rising, and researchers suspect this is a result of the large amount of individuals who have not had their tonsils surgically removed. For some people, the presence of another health condition can lead to the formation of tonsil stones and the potential for long-term discomfort.

 

Symptoms of tonsil stones include swollen tonsils, localized redness, and irritation. Many people also experience chronic bad breath as a result of the bacterial accumulation in these tonsil stones. For most patients, tonsil stones are simply annoying and rarely involve significant health complications. In rare cases, however, individuals may experience chronic tonsil inflammation or tonsillitis.

 

Causes of Tonsil Stones #1

 

Physicians have noted that those with repeated episodes of tonsillitis are more likely to develop tonsil stones, as inflamed or swollen tonsils are especially prone to the accumulation of debris and microorganisms. Once this accumulated material calcifies, small and hard tonsil stones are evident across the surface of the tonsils.

 

Causes of Tonsil Stones #2

 

Illnesses involving persistent postnasal drip are also associated with tonsil-stone formation. Postnasal drip involves the improper drainage of mucus from the nose and throat, which can lead to excess mucus in the tonsillar crypts and result in the development of tonsil stones.

 

Causes of Tonsil Stones #3

 

Similarly, chronic respiratory allergies may also lead to tonsil stones, as the body’s response to allergenic particles places additional stress on your immune system. This constant strain can make your tonsils more prone to debris and infection, and therefore makes tonsil-stone formation more likely.

 

In order to treat your tonsil stones effectively, it is important that you seek treatment for any underlying conditions that could be contributing to these tonsillar masses.

 

If you are experiencing tonsillitis, chronic postnasal drip, allergies, or other illnesses that may be aggravating your tonsil stones, see your family doctor. He or she can perform a physical examination of your nose, throat, and neck; based on the results of this examination, your doctor can remove any visible tonsil stones during your appointment and may suggest at-home treatments like better oral-hygiene habits.

 

Additionally, he or she may recommend that you visit an ear, nose, and throat specialist for further evaluation and other treatment options. If your tonsil stones persist and are problematic, your tonsils may need to be removed surgically.

 

Watch this Video – What are Tonsil Stones: Basic Information Symptoms and Treatment

This article is based on the book, “Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever” by Alison White, an ex-sufferer of tonsilloliths, also known as tonsil stones.

 

Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever is a guidebook that teaches you everything you need to know to get rid of painful, pesky and inconvenient tonsil stones without surgery.

 

This is a 7-day schedule to get rid of tonsil stones using natural remedies that are tried, tested and proven to work. If you are ready to take control of your health and to make the right decision regarding your tonsil stones, then click on Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever.

Here is What You Should Know about Diagnosing Tonsil Stones

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Tonsil stones, also known as tonsilloliths, are formed when decaying material is trapped in the crevices of your tonsils. Most people have small tonsil stones that do not cause noticeable symptoms. As a result, this condition is often discovered incidentally via X-rays or CT scans during the process of diagnosing tonsil stones.

 

Your tonsils (the palatine tonsils) are two, oval-shaped lymphatic organs that are located on either side of the back of your throat. Each tonsil is covered by a surface of pink mucosa, which contains small pits and channels that are known as the tonsillar crypts.

 

Debris such as food particles, dead cells, mucus, and microorganisms like viruses and bacteria can accumulate in these crypts. Once these materials begin to decay, they can become concentrated into round, pale tonsil stones.

 

Anyone can develop tonsil stones. However, this condition is most common in children and young adults who have a history of persistent throat infections. In general, tonsil stones do not create noticeable symptoms.

 

Some patients with larger, solidified tonsil stones may experience symptoms such as bad breath, recurrent sore throat, swollen tonsils, difficulty swallowing, and earaches. Visible white debris is also noted among some individuals with larger tonsil stones as well.

 

While many individuals develop small tonsil stones repeatedly, only a few patients suffer from large, solidified tonsil stones. Those who do experience this latter, more-problematic form of tonsil stones are often unaware of the cause of their discomfort.

 

In diagnosing tonsil stones, your family doctor usually makes an official diagnosis during an oral examination of your throat. Sometimes, he or she may order additional imaging studies to confirm this diagnosis and to pinpoint the size and location of the tonsil stones.

 

If you suspect that you may be experiencing tonsil stones, see your doctor for an oral examination. In the process of diagnosing tonsil stones, he or she can determine whether you have this condition and can suggest treatments to help you manage your symptoms.

 

In most cases, your tonsil stones will not create any significant symptoms or long-term health issues, and therefore no substantial treatment or surgery will be necessary after your diagnosis. For patients with recurrent, problematic tonsil stones, however, the tonsils may require more extensive diagnosing tonsil stones methods such as a tonsillectomy.

 

Watch this Video – What are the Symptoms of Tonsil Stones

This article is based on the book, “Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever” by Alison White, an ex-sufferer of tonsilloliths, also known as tonsil stones.

 

Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever is a guidebook that teaches you everything you need to know to get rid of painful, pesky and inconvenient tonsil stones without surgery.

 

This is a 7-day schedule to get rid of tonsil stones using natural remedies that are tried, tested and proven to work. If you are ready to take control of your health and to make the right decision regarding your tonsil stones, then click on Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever.

Living with Constant Foul Breath and Tonsil Stones

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The formation of tonsil stones is often associated with unpleasant side effects, such as earaches, difficulty swallowing, sore throats, and persistently bad breath.

 

Most people with tonsil stones also suffer from chronic bad breath that is related to their tonsils’ condition, since these small, hardened masses can release an unpleasant, lingering smell if they are not treated.

 

Your tonsils are two small, dimpled organs that are located on either side of the tongue at the back of the throat. These structures function as part of the lymphatic system by making white blood cells and antibodies and by trapping foreign substances that may enter the mouth.

 

The tonsils are made of lymphatic tissue and mucosa, and they also have irregular surfaces in which microorganisms, food particles, dead cells, and mucus can become lodged. If material remains in these crevices (also called the tonsillar crypts) for long, it can decay and harden into calcified tonsil stones.

 

Individuals with large tonsils are more prone to developing tonsil stones than those with smaller tonsils, as the deeper tonsillar crypts make the accumulation of debris more likely. Tonsil stones usually create symptoms like tonsil redness and irritation, and they are often associated with bad breath as a result of the decaying debris they contain.

 

In 2007, researchers at the State University of Campinas in Brazil noted that tonsil stones were present in nearly 75% of all tonsillitis patients with bad breath, but were only seen in six percent of patients with normal breath. As a result, tonsil stones appear to contribute to chronic bad breath in patients with inflamed tonsils.

 

Despite the unpleasant effects of bad breath that they may cause, tonsil stones rarely involve serious medical consequences. For others, however, tonsil stones can be bothersome and irritating because of symptoms like a perpetual sore throat, swollen tonsils, and chronic bad breath.

 

If you are experiencing chronic bad breath and think it could be related to tonsil stones, see your doctor for an examination. He or she may be able to dislodge any obvious tonsil stones in the office and to suggest at-home remedies to reduce your symptoms.

 

If your tonsil stones are large or troublesome, your doctor may suggest you see an ear, nose, and throat specialist for a more-extensive evaluation and for alternative treatment.

 

Watch this Video – Tonsil stones removal – Natural tonsil stones home remedy

This article is based on the book, “Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever” by Alison White, an ex-sufferer of tonsilloliths, also known as tonsil stones.

 

Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever is a guidebook that teaches you everything you need to know to get rid of painful, pesky and inconvenient tonsil stones without surgery.

 

This is a 7-day schedule to get rid of tonsil stones using natural remedies that are tried, tested and proven to work. If you are ready to take control of your health and to make the right decision regarding your tonsil stones, then click on Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever.

Which doctors may treat bad breath?

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For those who suffer from chronic bad breath, also known as halitosis, a home oral-care routine may not be enough to treat bad breath.

 

Even if you are maintaining an effective oral-hygiene routine of brushing your teeth, tongue, and gums and flossing after every meal or snack, you may still be experiencing bad breath. If this is the case, to treat bad breath, you should see a doctor or a dentist.

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, over 90% of bad breath cases are linked to issues in the mouth, throat, and tonsils. As a result, seeing a dentist is often the wisest option to treat bad breath.

 

To treat bad breath, your dentist can perform regular cleanings and exams, and he or she can also conduct further tests to ascertain what parts of your mouth are contributing to bad breath. Generally, your dentist is able to treat the causes of your bad breath.

 

If he or she determines that your mouth is healthy and not responsible for bad breath, your dentist may refer you to your family doctor or to a specialist for treatment.

Alternatively, another illness such as diabetes, cancer, or a respiratory infection can lead to symptoms involving bad breath. For cases like these, you should see your primary healthcare provider to diagnose and treat these underlying causes of unpleasant oral odor.

 

Sometimes medications are to blame for causing bad breath. If you suspect this may be the case, ask your prescribing physician if the medication can be adjusted or if he or she can suggest other options to treat bad breath.

Bad breath in infants or young children may indicate an infection or an undiagnosed medical issue. In these cases, consult your child’s pediatrician or dentist as soon as possible.

 

For adults and children, taking proper care of your teeth and visiting the dentist at least twice a year are the simplest ways to avoid bad breath and other oral-health concerns.

 

Watch this Video – The Doctors: Dr. Bill Dorfman on How to Cure Bad Breath

This article is based on the book,” Bad Breath Free Forever” by James Williams. This special report contains vital information that will enable you to take control of your life, banish bad breath, save your sex life, career and personal relationships.

 

Never again will you suffer the humiliation of bad breath. Get yourself cleaner, fresher breath and a more kissable mouth. You will enjoy increased self-confidence and positive effects on your self-esteem.

 

To find out how you can do it, CLICK HERE

 

Tonsil Stones (Tonsilloliths) can often cause bad breath

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Bad breath, also called halitosis, can sometimes be caused by small stones that form on the tonsils.

 

These tonsil stones (tonsilloliths) are made by clusters of calcified material in the crevices of the tonsils, also known as the tonsillar crypts. These stone-like clusters are composed of primarily calcium, but may also contain other materials like magnesium and phosphorus.

Although tonsil stones are rarely harmful, they can feel like a small lump in the tonsils and cause irritation. Because they are often difficult to remove, they can contribute to bad breath for an extended period of time.

 

While many people experience small tonsilloliths, it is generally rare to have a large, fully solidified tonsil stone.

Your tonsils are small lymphatic glands on either side of the back of your throat. Most medical experts believe that the tonsils function in the trapping of microorganisms like bacteria and viruses that pass through the throat.

 

Often, however, the tonsils’ trapping function becomes more of a hindrance than a help, since the trapped debris in the tonsillar crypts serves as a prime breeding ground for bacteria.

The tonsil stones themselves are caused by the buildup of sulfur-producing bacteria and debris from food particles and postnasal mucus. This buildup forms small lumps that become lodged in the tonsils, causing infection and pain.

 

Bad breath accompanies a tonsil infection and is generally considered the prime indicator of tonsil stones. This is because smelly volatile-sulfur compounds often accompany tonsil stones. Clinical research indicates that 75% of people with abnormally high volatile sulfur concentration in their breath also suffered from tonsil stones.

To prevent tonsil stone formation and bad breath, make sure to maintain a healthy daily oral-hygiene routine of flossing and brushing your teeth and gums. Using an antibacterial mouthwash each day can also target bacteria buildup and neutralize chemicals that cause bad breath.

 

If you suffer from chronic tonsil infection or large, recurrent tonsil stones, speak to your doctor about taking antibiotics or having your tonsils removed.

 

Watch this Video – How to get rid of bad breath due to tonsil stones? – Dr. Aniruddha KB

 

This article is based on the book,” Bad Breath Free Forever” by James Williams. This special report contains vital information that will enable you to take control of your life, banish bad breath, save your sex life, career and personal relationships.

 

Never again will you suffer the humiliation of bad breath. Get yourself cleaner, fresher breath and a more kissable mouth. You will enjoy increased self-confidence and positive effects on your self-esteem.

 

To find out how you can do it, CLICK HERE

 

Stress causes mental and physical health problems, including halitosis (bad breath)

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Bad breath, also called halitosis, can sometimes accompany stress or anxiety. While many factors can cause bad breath, such as poor dental hygiene, gum disease, or respiratory illnesses, prolonged stress can aggravate unhealthy oral conditions to make your breath smell unpleasant.

Stress causes a variety of mental and physical health problems, such as reduced productivity, muscle tension, and unstable moods. In your mouth specifically, stress can reduce the production of saliva, creating a dry mouth.

 

Without a healthy flow of saliva to wash away food particles and prevent bacteria from becoming lodged between your teeth, bad breath can quickly result from accumulating debris and the resulting sulfur production in the mouth.

 

In addition to reducing saliva production, stress can also lead to higher levels of stomach acid. Chronic acid production can create acid reflux, which is the backward flow of stomach contents into the esophagus and lower throat. Both these effects of stress result in an unpleasant oral odor that is evident when you speak or exhale.

Bad breath that is caused by stress can be most effectively treated by attending to the underlying cause. Stress can often be managed through support from loved ones, regular exercise, and relaxation techniques.

 

Prolonged or unmanageable stress should receive psychiatric treatment to determine the causes of your stress and to promote better health. Drinking plenty of water each day is also important, as dehydration further impairs saliva production and can worsen breath.

 

Additionally, chewing gum and sucking on sugar-free lozenges can increase saliva flow and provide an outlet for nervous tension, thereby reducing the effects of stress-prompted bad breath.

 

Make sure that you visit your dentist at least twice each year for regular cleanings and exams, as he or she can help you design and maintain an effective daily oral-hygiene routine.

 

Watch these Videos

 

Can Stress Give You Bad Breath?

 

How to Cure Bad Breath – How to Get Rid Of Bad Breath – Bad Breath Causes & Remedies

This article is based on the book,” Bad Breath Free Forever” by James Williams. This special report contains vital information that will enable you to take control of your life, banish bad breath, save your sex life, career and personal relationships.

 

Never again will you suffer the humiliation of bad breath. Get yourself cleaner, fresher breath and a more kissable mouth. You will enjoy increased self-confidence and positive effects on your self-esteem.

 

To find out how you can do it, CLICK HERE

 

Some people experience halitophobia (a fear of having bad breath)

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Although many people suffer from chronic bad breath, also called halitosis, some people only experience the fear of having bad breath. This fear is referred to as halitophobia, and it occurs in those who think they have bad breath when they do not.

Individuals who suffer from halitophobia experience extremely overstated concerns or delusions about having bad breath. This condition is estimated to be present in nearly 25 percent of patients seeking professional assistance for halitosis, and almost one-half to one percent of adults may suffer from halitophobia.

For those with halitophobia, the fear of having others become aware of their perceived bad breath can lead them to demonstrate a variety of odd behaviors.

 

For example, someone with halitophobia may cover his or her mouth when talking or avoid interacting with others in social situations. Those with halitophobia can often fixate on cleaning their teeth and tongue and may constantly use gum, mints, mouthwashes, and sprays in an effort to reduce their distress at their apparent bad breath.

 

These coping behaviors can often be attributed to some form of obsessive-compulsive disorder which prompts specific self-conscious patterns.

 

Halitophobia is regarded as severe when the fear of having bad breath prompts individuals to experience impaired daily functioning such as social anxiety, depression, and withdrawal.

Initially, the most effective method of treating halitophobia is to get rid of any potential bad breath symptoms. See your dentist regularly for cleanings and exams, and make sure you maintain a thorough oral-hygiene routine of brushing and flossing teeth and gums.

 

If no underlying medical or hygienic reason for bad breath can be found by a dentist, those with halitophobia can often benefit from seeing a psychologist.

 

Only a clinical psychologist can officially diagnose and treat the psychosomatic aspects of halitophobia. Psychological counseling and treatment may address any causal reasons for the phobia and can propose ways to help alleviate distress.

 

Watch this Video – Halitophobia – bad breath overcome

This article is based on the book,” Bad Breath Free Forever” by James Williams. This special report contains vital information that will enable you to take control of your life, banish bad breath, save your sex life, career and personal relationships.

 

Never again will you suffer the humiliation of bad breath. Get yourself cleaner, fresher breath and a more kissable mouth. You will enjoy increased self-confidence and positive effects on your self-esteem.

 

To find out how you can do it, CLICK HERE