Tag Archives: thyroid disorder

Why Soy Foods Should Be Avoided if You Have Thyroid Disorder?

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Western societies are now consuming an increasing amount of soy that is unfermented and highly processed.

 

The reason?

 

Food manufacturers favour soy as a cheap and versatile ingredient. It’s added to a wide range of human food products and is also routinely used in the animal feed industry.

 

You really need to become a vigilant label checker to discover if a food contains some type of soy ingredient. Soy is now found in bread, breakfast cereals, biscuits, crackers, margarine, chocolate, sauces and soups.

 

Soy is also used to make soy milk, baby formula, soy protein shakes, soy cheese, soy ice cream, vegetable stock, texturised vegetarian soy protein, soy flour, soy protein bars, soy lecithin and soybean oil.

 

Soy protein products and infant formulas often contain soy protein isolate. This is not something that you can make in your kitchen. This soy ingredient is made in high tech chemical processing plants.

 

The extraction process utilises high temperatures and the soybeans are bathed in hexane, a toxic chemical solvent despite the usage of hexane is being prohibited when processing organic soy foods.

 

The safety of soy based infant formula is hotly debated as these products naturally contain a class of plant compounds called isoflavones. The primary isoflavones are genistein and daidzein. These isoflavones are referred to as phytoestrogens because they are found in plants (phyto) and they have the ability to mimic estrogens in the body.

 

It is well recognised infants are sensitive to estrogen exposure as they progress though different developmental stages. This makes infants more likely than adults to be vulnerable to the estrogen-like effects of the phytoestrogens found in soy. There is also research to show that genistein and similar isoflavones can compete for iodine when iodine stores are low.

 

Further, infants fed soy containing formula in early life have a higher risk of developing autoimmune thyroid disease. For infants fed soy formula their rate of exposure to phyotestrogens is much higher which may a negative impact on both their thyroid health and hormonal balance.

 

Soy + Asian cultures

 

In Asia, small quantities of whole bean soy products are considered a traditional staple of the diet. From the simple soybean comes a variety of foods including tofu, natto, miso, tempeh, and boiled soy beans (edamame). These foods are prepared using traditional methods to make these otherwise inedible foods nutritious.

 

Soybeans like other beans, nuts, and seeds contain naturally occurring enzyme inhibitors. Termed phytic acid or phytates, these compounds make soy difficult to digest and also have the potential to bind to minerals in the digestive system.

 

In this way phytic acid acts as an ‘anti-nutrient’ to prevent the absorption of important minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc.

 

Soybeans contain a much higher phytic acid content than most other grains and legumes. If you have been over doing soy products you may be low in these minerals.

 

Thyroid Disorder: Does soy harm the thyroid?

 

An incredible amount of hype has accompanied the meteoric rise of soy as a popular ‘health’ alternative. Once reserved as a staple for vegetarians’ soy is finding its way into the shopping baskets of more conventional consumers in various forms, usually disguised as a refined soy ingredient.

 

When it comes to thyroid health and if you have thyroid disorder, processed soy foods and foods containing soy ingredients should be strictly avoided.

 

Soy is goitrogenic, a term used to describe many foods and environmental compounds that have a serious potential to block normal thyroid activity and causes thyroid disorder.

 

Highly processed soy products are not normally manufactured using the phytic acid reducing techniques used in traditional cultures such as soaking or long slow cooking.

 

This makes these foods harder to breakdown in the digestive system. Overt time this can lead to digestive distress and lowered micronutrient intake.

 

This is not good news for thyroid health as the thyroid is particularly sensitive to nutrient deficiencies. For example; iodine, zinc and selenium are three minerals critical to aid ongoing thyroid hormone activity and prevent thyroid disorder.

 

Globally soybean oil has become the most widely used dietary oil. This soy derived oil is routinely used in margarine and shortening. It is also used in salad dressings, mayonnaise, frozen foods, commercially baked goods and simulated dairy and meat products. Soy oil along with palm oil and canola oil is often deceptively referred to as ‘vegetable oil’ on food labels.

 

Food manufacturers label dietary oils as ‘vegetable oils’ to make them sound healthy. However this is far from the truth. They are neither nutritious nor healthy.

 

The long term consumption of these oils has the potential to harm the thyroid and causes thyroid disorder. As more of these oils are incorporated into the thyroid cells their goitrogenic effects becomes more obvious.

 

The environmental impact of soy

 

The biggest shift in farming methods occurred over the last century, particularly with the introduction of ‘monocultures’. These are large scale farming areas dedicated to a single crop. Soy crops are monocultures favoured by multinational agribusiness to supply a growing demand.

 

As traditional farming methods are lost and the modern monoculture system of production emerges there is an increasing susceptibility of crops to insects and disease. This then pushes up the use of toxic agricultural chemicals.

 

Large soy plantations are viewed by environmentalists as a growing menace. Intense soybean cultivation threatens fragile ecosystems and is taking a significant toll on deforestation of the globe.

 

Soy + genetic engineering

 

Genetic engineering is the process of using biotechnology to transfer specific traits or genes from one organism into a different plant species. The result is a genetically modified (GM) food. The safety and potential long term health risks of these ‘frankenfoods’ is regularly questioned.

 

Soy, canola and corn are the most prevalent GM ingredients and are used in many food products. The first genetically engineered soybeans were planted in the USA in 1996. Now more than 90% of the USA soy crop is GM.

 

As the GM industry grows there has been a corresponding demand for food labels to clearly state if GM plants or microorganisms have been used in production.

 

In the European Union all food, and any ingredients directly produced from a GM source must be labelled even when the GM ingredients may be undetectable in the final product.

 

The ‘Roundup Ready’ soybean controversy

 

The GM soybean known as the Roundup Ready (RR) soybean was developed by the biotech giant Monsanto based in the USA. This crop variety was developed to make it resistant to the Roundup herbicides products which are toxic to conventional soybean plants. Apart from the issue with genetic engineering this GM soy is contaminated with pesticide residues which can easily find their way into the food supply.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – Soy Myths Exposed: The Dangers of Soy

 

Read the following related articles:

 

10 Hypothyroidism Diet Tips to Help Heal Your Thyroid

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

Skin Deep. Do Cosmetics Harm the Thyroid?

 

What is the Best Way to Diagnose Hypothyroidism?

 

Can Basal Temperature Testing Help Diagnosis A Thyroid Problem?

 

Should You Get a T3 Test If You Find It Hard to Lose Weight?

 

Why Knowing How to Calculate Your Reverse T3 Ratio Helps to Assess Overall Thyroid Health?

 

How to Lose Weight with an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Top 6 Detox Tips to Safeguard Thyroid Health

 

6 Possible Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

6 Possible Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid

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Green tea blends are a popular and stylish drink of choice for health conscious individuals. But is green tea beneficial when you have a thyroid disorder?

 

An article published in 2010 in the Human and Experimental Toxicology journal was the first to raise questions about the possible anti-thyroid effects of green tea.

 

The researchers reported a significant decrease in T3 and T4 thyroid hormone concentrations when rats where given high doses of green tea. They also reported a significant rise in TSH in response to a drop in thyroid hormone levels.

 

There have been further studies into the possible harmful effects of high dose green tea on the thyroid. But to date these have all been conducted on animals.

 

It will be good to see human studies released in the future to reveal if green tea is truly harmful to the thyroid. Feeding laboratory rats high amounts of green tea extract does not reflect what is happening in the real world.

 

This brings to light an important issue when investigating published research. No matter what health topic you are researching, human studies are superior to those carried out with animals. The best studies are done using a large cross section of the general population.

 

Despite the limitations with the current research into how green tea affects the thyroid you may want to read more before you brew up your next cup. If you have a problem with your thyroid this popular beverage may be less than ideal.

 

Why green tea may not be all that healthy when you have hypothyroidism…

 

Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid #1 The quality varies according to where the tea is grown and how it is harvested. If you drink green tea select a certified organic product that clearly displays the organic certification logo on the label. Choosing an organic product will minimise your exposure to pesticides which are known to harm the thyroid. Also check the country of origin if possible.

 

Most of the world’s green tea is from China. Green tea is known to accumulate an array of toxins from the soil and water. It is well worth seeking out a product that is grown and harvested in an area free of industrial pollution.

 

Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid 2# Green tea can contain unacceptable levels of fluoride. The tea bush readily absorbs fluoride thorough its root system. If you brew green tea using unfiltered water you will further increase your intake of fluoride as most urban water supplies contain this toxic chemical.

 

As you probably already know, fluoride blocks iodine absorption. The thyroid uses iodine to produce the thyroid hormones making this an essential nutrient for ongoing thyroid activity. Fluoride also has potent negative effects on the structure and strength of your bones.

 

Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid #3 Green tea may be too ‘cooling’ when you have hypothyroidism. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) all foods and drinks have certain qualities that govern how they affect the body. Green tea is considered ‘cooling’ and is indicated to clear heat from the body.

 

As hypothyroidism is a ‘cold’ condition a beverage that further cools the body may be less than ideal. To counter the cooling effects of the green tea you could try adding freshly grated ginger to your tea infusion. Ginger is a warming remedy that aids circulation.

 

Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid #4 Tannins released naturally during steeping may reduce iron absorption. If you have low iron levels, or are prone to low iron stores the general advice is to drink green tea at least two hours away from meals. Over-steeping green tea will release greater amounts of tannins. Tannins make the tea taste bitter and will cause a drying effect in the mouth.

 

Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid #5 Green tea naturally contains caffeine. Although green tea contains less caffeine than coffee, drinking green tea at night, or even later in the day may disturb restful sleep. For this reason it is best consumed in the morning. If you ever feel ‘jittery’ chances are you are drinking too much.

 

Green Tea Side Effects on Thyroid #6 Caffeine acts as a diuretic and may also affect the normal rhythm of the heart. Individuals with serious heart conditions are therefore advised to avoid any type of beverage that contains caffeine. This includes nutritional products featuring green tea extracts containing caffeine.

 

Watch these videos below:

 

 

Green Tea Side Effects – Must Watch This Before Taking Green Tea

Read the following related articles:

 

10 Hypothyroidism Diet Tips to Help Heal Your Thyroid

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

Skin Deep. Do Cosmetics Harm the Thyroid?

 

What is the Best Way to Diagnose Hypothyroidism?

 

Can Basal Temperature Testing Help Diagnosis A Thyroid Problem?

 

Should You Get a T3 Test If You Find It Hard to Lose Weight?

 

Why Knowing How to Calculate Your Reverse T3 Ratio Helps to Assess Overall Thyroid Health?

 

How to Lose Weight with an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Top 6 Detox Tips to Safeguard Thyroid Health

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

Why Testing for Viral Infections Can Solve Your Thyroid Disorder?

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Uncovering a long standing infection could offer a real solution to solving your thyroid disorder. Did you know chronic infections can easily masquerade as hypothyroidism?

 

In fact, there’s often an overlap between hypothyroidism and symptoms triggered by a lingering viral infection.

 

This article discusses testing for viral infections. Long standing infections that are active in the body are linked to chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

Chronic fatigue syndrome, aka myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) is a disease of the immune system.

 

There is a vast amount of research to demonstrate infections are the most likely cause of chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

How to Test For Viral Infections

 

There is no single test to diagnose a chronic viral infection, or even multiple viral infections. For this reason medical practitioners usually screen a patient for the main viruses which tend to cause long term problems. Your medical practitioner will also take into account your symptoms and health history.

 

Antibody Tests Are Usually Used To Check For Long Standing Viral Infections

 

Termed antibody tests, these types of blood tests are the obvious place to start the search for chronic infections.

 

Antibodies are molecules produced by the immune system to fight an infection. By doing specific antibody tests you can detect the presence of antibodies to a particular viral infection. When antibodies are discovered it will also reveal whether you were infected recently or in the past.

 

A stable positive result indicates past infection. In contrast, a high antibody load indicates recent infection, or reactivation of a past infection. The most consistent marker of progression of an infection within the body is a rising antibody titre. This term is used to describe the amount of antibodies that are measured within a blood sample.

 

Active viruses travel through the blood. These microscopic viruses are ‘non-living’ and they lack the ability to replicate on their own. To ensure their survival these viruses must take hold within the host cell. Left unchecked by the immune system they have the ability to integrate themselves into many cells of the body.

 

The two leading viruses that trigger chronic fatigue symptoms are Epstein – Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV).

 

Medical practitioners often test for these two viruses when a patient has fatigue issues. These two viruses often target the central nervous system and liver causing problems.

 

The tests listed here will help diagnose an infection with the viruses most commonly associated with chronic fatigue symptoms.

 

  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibodies
  • Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibodies
  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV)) antibodies
  • Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies
  • Herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies
  • Varicella Zoster virus antibodies

 

A Viral Infection Can Give Rise to a Diverse Range of Symptoms

 

A virus lodged within the cell continues to replicate and by integrating itself deep within the cell it avoids detection by the immune system. The immune system therefore does not make antibodies to viruses that have become hidden within organs and other tissues of the body.

 

This makes identifying a viral infection a real challenge. It is possible to have a significant intracellular infection, but still show relatively low antibody levels when you take an antibody test.

 

A chronic viral infection can cause a range of diverse symptoms depending on the original infection involved. When a virus takes hold in the central nervous system, or enters an organ such as the liver or digestive tract it gives rise to a range of complaints such as fatigue, liver tenderness and neurological problems.

 

Your medical practitioner may also request a white cell count (WCC) and liver function test (LFT).

 

Watch this Video below – How are viral infections diagnosed and treated

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Are Iodine Supplements For Thyroid Health Really Safe?

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

 

5 Best Ways to Protect Yourself from Iodine Toxicity

 

Is It Safe To Take Iodine When You Have Hashimotos Disease?

 

Why these Top 5 Thyroid Blood Tests are Essential?

 

What Causes High Reverse T3 (RT3) – a Major Driver of an Underactive Thyroid?

 

Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms are Strikingly Similar to Hypothyroidism Symptoms?

 

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

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Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the thyroid, the small gland at the base of the neck.

 

This thyroid disorder was first described by the Japanese specialist Dr. Hashimoto Hakaru in 1912. Today Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism.

 

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is termed an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune problems occur when the immune system attacks specific organs of the body.

 

The immune system launches an attack on an organ in the same way it would attack a foreign invader such as a virus or bacteria.

 

The autoimmune reaction associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis creates inflammation within the thyroid. The thyroid stops functioning properly, and in some cases the inflammation leads to destruction of the thyroid.

 

The signs and symptoms of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are similar to the symptoms usually associated with hypothyroidism. The symptoms vary widely depending on the severity of the problem.

 

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and pregnancy

 

Optimal thyroid health is particularly important for women who are pregnant or who are considering having a baby. For women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis there is an increased risk of early miscarriage or developing postpartum thyroiditis within the first year of having a baby.

 

How to diagnose Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

 

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is signified by excess production of thyroid antibodies. To diagnose this disorder a specific test that measures antibody levels is required. Abnormally elevated thyroid antibodies thereby confirm the diagnosis.

 

Your healthcare practitioner may request the following pathology tests; thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Most practitioners will also measure T4 and T3 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to determine how the thyroid gland is functioning.

 

A physical examination of the thyroid region along with a thyroid ultrasound may also be performed.

 

A single test of TSH is inadequate to screen an individual for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. You must get your thyroid antibodies checked!

 

Why is the thyroid prone to autoimmune disease?

 

There are no established reasons why the immune system triggers an autoimmune attack on the thyroid. Some health researchers think a virus or bacterial infection may initiate this response, while others believe a genetic flaw may be involved.

 

It is likely Hashimoto’s results form a range of factors. This thyroid autoimmune disorder may be triggered by exposure to toxins, chronic infections, food intolerances (especially gluten), high iodine intake and heavy metal toxicity.

 

Watch this Video Below Here – What Causes Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

There is a high volume of blood washing through your thyroid. This makes the thyroid extremely susceptible to damage from environmental toxins or whatever compounds happen to be circulating in the blood. Damaged thyroid cells may be the spark that ignites an autoimmune reaction within the thyroid.

 

There is a clear-cut link between selenium and thyroid function. Is this the missing link?

 

After iodine the next most important nutrient to aid thyroid health is selenium. Selenium acts as an important co-factor to the iodide peroxidase enzyme. This specialised enzyme converts thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3). This enzyme therefore plays an pivotal role to regulate concentration of T3.

 

Selenium also plays an important role in safeguarding the thyroid from environmental damage.

 

This trace mineral helps boost glutathione, a potent antioxidant that is highly active within the thyroid. Glutathione is naturally produced by the body by combining selenium with three amino acids sourced from dietary protein. These three amino acids are cysteine, glycine and glutamine.

 

The thyroid contains more selenium than any other body part. When a deficiency develops due to low dietary intake an individual is more likely to develop an autoimmune thyroid disorder. In fact, in regions of severe selenium deficiency there is a higher incidence of autoimmune thyroid disorders.

 

Research suggests selenium supplementation could be useful in combination with levothyroxine (T4) in the treatment of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

 

Selenium is generally considered safe when taken as recommended. In Australia and New Zealand it is recommended that a daily dose of 150 micrograms from dietary supplements should not be exceeded.

 

Read the following related articles:

 

Warnings: 4 Types of Toxic Cookware to Avoid & Why

 

What is really The Best Cooking Oil for Thyroid Health?

 

5 Important Steps for Hypothyroidism Treatment Success

 

Hormone Problem? Here’s Your Hormone Imbalance Checklist

 

Author Bio:

 

Louise O’ Connor, the author of The Natural Thyroid Diet –The 4-Week Plan to Living Well, Living Vibrantly, who is a specialist in Thyroid Health. She is a highly regarded Australian Naturopath and founder of Wellnesswork.

 

The Natural Thyroid Diet goes beyond diet advice and offers practical and effective ways to achieve healthy thyroid levels within just a short period of time. For more details, Click on The-Natural-Thyroid-Diet.com

 

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