How to Build Muscle and Lose Fat on a High Protein Vegetarian Diet?


Click HERE to Find Out How You Can Build Muscle & Lose Fat By Eating Plants

THE HENCH HERBIVORE

“I recognize the most happiness comes not from material things or status, etc. but from doing good for others (people and animals).”

Name: Paul Kerton
Occupation: Personal Trainer / YouTuber
Location: Norwich, England
Age: 42
Height: 6’0″
Weight: 252 lb.
Type of Training: Bodybuilding, Martial Arts

Q: Tell us the story behind #veGAINism and Hench Herbivore.

Vegainism was a typo! I thought it looked good and conveyed the message that I’m trying to bring to the world, that animals need not suffer for us to excel in the gym.

Similar message with Hench Herbivore. Someone accused me of looking like a hench herbivore one day, and again, I liked the sound of it! Because of the modern vernacular “hench,” I feel like it helps bring veganism up to date too!

Q: What were the steps you took to transition to plant-based nutrition? 

After reading “The China Study” and watching many videos on NutritionFacts.org, I went mostly plant-based, save for three servings of wild salmon and two of organic beef per week. About five months later, after learning more about plant-based nutrition, I decided to go after it 100 percent.

Q: What did you eat today?

  • 8 a.m.: Smoothie consisting of 1 Lt filtered water, 400g bananas, 220g dates, 150g raspberries, 66g spinach, 7g chia seeds, 7g flaxseeds, and 30g brown rice protein powder.
  • 12 p.m.: Smoothie (same ingredients)
  • 4 p.m.: Smoothie (same ingredients)
  • 8 p.m.: Snack of 200g steamed kale with nutritional yeast.
  • 9 p.m.: Homemade curry consisting of 1 can chickpeas, 1 can tomatoes, 1 onion, 1 green pepper, 1 carrot, 1 stick celery, spices, coriander, and mint. Served with 200g (pre-cooked weight) brown rice.

Supplements: B12, D3, DHA/EPA, and glucosamine.

Q: Staple vegan post-workout meal recipe (or breakfast).

I nearly always have a smoothie as outlined above; however, if I feel like a change, occasionally I may have 200g porridge oats cooked in soya or almond milk with a scoop of brown rice protein mixed in, plus 150g mixed berries, 15g milled chia or flaxseeds, and 220g chopped dates.

Q: What does your training look like these days? How much weight are you pushing these days?

Four-day split currently:

  • quads/hams
  • chest/calves/bis
  • back/rear delts/traps
  • front+side delts/tris/abs/obliques

Been doing HIIT for a while but about to transition into more volume.

My best lifts are leg press 835 lb. x 10, bench press 250 lb. x 10, and pull-down 200 lb. x 12.

Q: Favorite three exercises and why?

Leg press: the weights are stacking up!

Side lateral raise: for shoulder width and the way it burns!

Pec dec: really love the feeling in the pecs when you give them a hard contraction at the apex of the rep and the speed you can transition into drop sets to really finish off a chest session.

Q: Who’s your favorite bodybuilder and athlete? 

2014 Mr. Universe Barny du Plesses: he decided to go vegan after a chat we had one day. Spent six months training with him, so we formed a deep friendship.

Watching him speak of his veganism live on stage at the 2015 Pro Universe show is about the bravest thing I ever saw!

Tim Shieff: he’s really mastered his body, is deeply spiritual, vegan, and a force for good!

Q: Tell me a story of the mentor who played a key role in building confidence in yourself.

The person I owe most of my confidence to is my old karate sensei, Ken Bailey. I came to him as a small nervous child, and he gave me the skills/mental abilities to become a successful doorman and later personal trainer.

I didn’t see Ken for a number of years. When I caught up with him next, he was in his 60s. He was sporting a black eye. When I asked what had happened, he seemed a bit dejected, saying that two youths had assaulted him. Turns out he had sorted them both out but was just annoyed that they’d got one in on him!

Q: Fun fact most people don’t know about you?

“One night as a young child, I had a visit from a poltergeist.”

I did not see him, but a deep man’s voice was telling me that the beaker I had next to the bed would not be there in the morning. I remember over and over again calling him stupid. In the morning, I was in the living room playing with my toy cars, and my mum went through to make my bed.

She shouted, “Why have you put your beaker under your pillow?” When I told her it wasn’t me, she wouldn’t believe me and so I got really upset, and I remember crying a lot. I think that’s the only real reason it all stuck in my head, and I wonder if there were other times similar things may have happened.

Certainly, I have had several paranormal experiences during my adult life.

Q: What strange/weird things do you believe in?

The last couple of years, following on from my switch to veganism, I’ve had a deep spiritual awakening. Noticing amazing synchronicities led me to shunning mainstream fitness and marketing myself as a vegan PT.

“I’ve had great success with Law of Attraction, crystals, and seeing a clairvoyant, and I truly believe I am living my life’s purpose.”

Q: How do you wind down and relax at night?

  • YouTube
  • Podcasts
  • Reading

Q: What have you changed your mind about in past 10 years?

I now truly believe that anatomically, psychologically, and bio-chemically, humans are frugivores (a type of herbivore) and NOT obligate omnivores as some would have us believe. I used to think that the more meat and dairy I ate, the more I would excel in the gym.

“Until a few short years back, I feel I was coming from a place of ego (fear) where I wanted to portray this big tough guy image. Nowadays, I like to have an impressive physique, but for a positive reason, to promote the vegan diet in a good light.”

Also, rather than constantly seeking things to please myself, I now have a real attitude of paying it forward and being of service. I recognize the most happiness comes not from material things or status, etc. but from doing good for others (people and animals).

Q: What three pearls of wisdom would you tell your 18-year-old self?

  1. GO VEGAN!
  2. Your thoughts create your reality: get rid of negative self-talk and truly believe you have the power to create anything you wish in your life.
  3. Follow your passion.

To find out how to build muscle and lose fat on a high protein vegetarian diet, watch this video – How To Eat To Build Muscle & Lose Fat (Lean Bulking Full Day Of Eating)

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – How to Build Muscle and Lose Fat on a High Protein Vegetarian Diet?

How to Gain Muscle and Lose Weight on a Vegetarian Diet?


Click HERE to Find Out How You Can Build Muscle & Lose Fat By Eating Plants

DARIA DEPTULA SHOWS MIAMI WHAT VEGAN LOOKS LIKE

“I stopped drinking, partying, and really focused on my fitness. Working out has always been a kind of therapy for me. Anytime I was in the gym I felt in my element. Then I discovered veganism, and it’s like everything just clicked!”

Name: Daria Deptula
Occupation: Sales Ambassador for Sazerac Company but currently in the process of getting certified as a Health Coach
Location: Miami, FL
Age: 32
Height: 5’4”
Weight: 127 lb.

Q: Tell us the story of how you got turned on to plant-based fitness.

I’ve always been into health and fitness since I can remember. Working out for me was a part of my life, so I never felt like I was forcing myself to hit the gym, but I always had challenges with the proper diet to complement my lifestyle. It wasn’t that I didn’t eat healthy, I just never felt energized enough without pre-workout, etc.

I heard about the Forks Over Knives documentary on Netflix and watched it one night, then watched it again and again, until all of the information truly sank in and made an impact on me.

Cancer runs in my family. My dad beat colon cancer 15 years ago, and my cousin recently developed breast cancer in her 30s.

The facts were all right on the screen, and once I saw Mac Danzig, the UFC fighter, speak about going plant-based, I was all in!

Q: What advice would you give to someone just starting out on this path?

My advice would be to do as much research as possible to educate yourself on the benefits of the diet, the proper balanced nutrition, and the ethical side of going vegan. Watch documentaries, YouTube videos, read books (I recommend “The Happy Vegan” by Russell Simmons), and follow social media accounts which support this lifestyle.

Q: Tell us about what Generation Vegan is and your involvement in it.

I was approached by Dani Weiss from Generation Vegan to do a podcast interview for her YouTube channel a while back. She interviews vegan athletes to give people a perspective on plant-based fitness and break all stereotypes associated with veganism.

She is a such an inspiring person herself! We became quick friends during the interview, which was over two hours because we couldn’t stop talking.

(Watch Video Here — Generation Vegan: Daria Deptula)

Q: What does the first 60 minutes of your morning look like?

I wake up at 6 a.m. every day by my five-month old puppy, Mali. She’s my alarm clock and the first thing to have my attention every morning. Then it’s time for my warm water with apple cider vinegar and lemon, and after about 15 minutes or so, I have my breakfast and start getting ready for the gym.

Q: What did you eat yesterday?

  • Every morning before I have any bite of food, I have a huge glass of warm water with organic lemon and a few tablespoons of apple cider vinegar.
  • I drink over 64 ounces of water a day.
  • For breakfast, I had 1 slice of Ezekiel Sprouted 100% Whole Grain Bread with Justin’s Maple Almond butter and sliced bananas on top (one of my favs!).
  • After I hit the gym, I had a protein shake made with Vega Sport Chocolate Plant-Based Protein powder, a scoop of Super Greens powder, 2 tablespoons of ground chia and flaxseeds, kale, parsley, cilantro, blueberries, a cup of almond milk, and the rest purified water (this all fits in my NutriBullet).
  • For lunch, I had a quinoa bowl with black beans, avocado, half of a purple yam, and spinach, sprinkled with nutritional yeast.
  • Fuji apple for a snack during the day.
  • For dinner, I made a tempeh skillet, with bell peppers, onions, and spinach, and ate the other half of the purple yam, since they’re like candy to me!

Q: Favorite three exercises and why?

Boxing has been my favorite since I started taking classes about six years ago. It’s become a huge part of my workouts, and now I teach classes at SobeKick Miami about two times a week.

Sumo squats are my second favorite because I love targeting the glutes, especially living in Miami!

I’m also a huge fan of pistols. I used to CrossFit for about a year and a half, and incorporate some of those moves I learned into my workouts.

Q: Tell us a story of the mentor who played a key role in building confidence in yourself.

Johnny Rock, the owner of SobeKick Gym, has really helped me see my potential. He saw me as someone who could really motivate others and become a badass fitness instructor. He is one of the most genuine people I have ever met!

I am in the process of getting certified as a health coach and will be focusing on helping others who want to thrive on a vegan diet and in fitness.

Q: What is the biggest personal challenge you have had to overcome in your life?

I moved to Miami seven years ago with no goal in sight. I got sucked into the party life.

My idea of fun was going out four to five nights a week and getting home at the crack of dawn.

The other days, I would be recovering so I could do it all over again. I was all over the place.

There were so many moments when I would say to myself, “OK, it’s time to get your shit together!

No more clubs or drinking or partying!” — only to forget all about it the moment someone asked me to go out.

It wasn’t until I started to really take full responsibility for my actions that I realized how much time I was wasting on party and “fun.”

I’ve always been a bookaholic. I’m fascinated by human psychology, among other topics. I read a book called “The Power of Habit,” which talked about a negative “keystone habit” that triggers other bad habits and decisions in a person’s life. I had an awakening moment and realized that habit for me was drinking.

Something told me to search the bookstore on my iPhone, and I came upon an audiobook called “Control Alcohol: Stop Drinking Now” by Craig Beck. That audiobook changed my life.

“It opened my eyes to the truth about alcohol and the lies we tell ourselves just to continue drinking. The moment my beliefs about alcohol changed is the moment I stopped my vicious cycle.”

Once I refocused and gained back control over my life, everything started to fall into place. My friends and family saw the positive impact this decision had in my life, and have been very supportive.

I stopped drinking, partying, and really focused on my fitness. Working out has always been a kind of therapy for me. Any time I was in the gym, I felt in my element. Then I discovered veganism, and it’s like everything just clicked!

Q: What are some fun facts most people don’t know about you?

I graduated college with a Communications Disorders degree and was a speech therapist for about five years. I also own every Harry Potter and Twilight book.

Q: What three pearls of wisdom would you tell your 13-year-old self?

  1. Follow your intuition and listen to your inner voice.
  2. Stop worrying so much about what others think.
  3. Remember to always be grateful!

For more ideas on how to gain muscle and lose weight on a vegetarian diet, watch this video – How to Build Muscle On A Vegan Diet – The In-Depth Guide

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – How to Gain Muscle and Lose Weight on a Vegetarian Diet

How to Eat and Train as a Vegetarian Bodybuilder?


Click HERE to Find Out How You Can Build Muscle & Lose Fat By Eating Plants

OWNER OF NATURAL MUSCLE MAGAZINE SAYS FITNESS IS EXPANDING

“When consulting with the judges, they offered me some advice, ‘do a few cycles and you will win every show.’ I walked away and from that day forward, I chose to enter only drug tested competitions.”

Debbie Baigrie embodies strength inside and out, and utilizes bodybuilding as a vehicle to self-cultivation.

A few months ago Debbie and I connected because she liked what we’re doing here at VegetarianBodybuilding.com and wanted to publish some of my work.

Through this exchange, I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know her, and was pleased to discover we share an affinity for bodybuilding that focuses on vibrancy and longevity.

Debbie is a mother, daughter, dog owner, former vegetarian bodybuilder, and the owner of “Natural Muscle Magazine.” 

Her journey is wonderfully admirable (and at times, shocking), and I’m pleased to present this interview with you today.

Q: Tell us the story of how “Natural Muscle Magazine” came about, and how you acquired your passion for bodybuilding.

Back in the early 90s, I wanted to be a personal trainer. My daughters were in preschool, and I thought it would be something fun to do part-time. I took the exam, and to add credibility to my business, I entered a bodybuilding competition. A title would enhance my credentials, I thought, and the preparation would teach me hands-on training and diet.

“My plan was to enter one contest, but after winning the overall title, I caught the bug.”

I continued competing for four more years. A year into my competitive “career,” I entered a national qualifier and won my class, but not the overall.

When consulting with the judges, they offered me some advice: “Do a few cycles and you will win every show.” I walked away, and from that day forward, I chose to enter only drug-tested competitions.

We were being touted in a Florida-based magazine, “Florida Muscle News,” as the best bodybuilding shows in Florida.

Then one day, I got a phone call from their editor telling me that they are not allowed to give us any more coverage.

The NPC had come down hard on them for promoting an event that was not sanctioned by them. So there we were with no coverage and no advertising.

All of our amazing natural athletes needed a platform, and we needed somewhere to advertise our events, so “Natural Muscle Magazine” was born.

“Florida Muscle News” now had competition in Florida, and they were not happy about it.

I was banned from covering any NPC events and escorted out of the events I tried attending.

That was twenty years ago, and we are still going strong.

Q: Who most influenced your trajectory at a young age?

Three people who had the most influence on my career were my maternal grandfather, my paternal grandmother, and my high school principal.

“My grandfather emigrated from Poland with only a fourth grade education and became a very successful businessman using common sense and hard work.”

He could build a house from scratch, and he built several. He could basically do anything. I loved watching him build and still love the smell of sawdust. My grandmother owned businesses dating back to the thirties, something unheard of for a woman back then. She owned a hat business in Europe and made the beautiful hats herself.

She was an honest, outspoken, and driven woman, and lived until she was 96. I like to think I got my drive from her.

Then there is my high school principal, Mrs. Naymark, whose words still drive me to succeed every day to be the best person I can be: “Debbie, you will never amount to anything.” I went to a very small private school, and did not fit into the mold or take my education very seriously.

Q: What advice would you tell your 18-year-old self?

I would advise her to become highly educated in a field she loves. If I could go back to 18, my life might look a lot different now. Back then, nothing was expected of me. I was simply put on this earth to be pretty and marry a man who will take care of me.

My Jewish mother used to say, “If you play your cards right and marry a doctor, you will be set for life.”

So I married an engineer and told my daughters, “if you play your cards right and become a doctor, you will be set for life.” Last week, I watched my oldest daughter graduate medical school! Another piece of advice I would give myself is not to listen to Mrs. Naymark!

Q: Why is compassion so important to you, and how has it made you a stronger woman?

It often takes strength to have compassion. I was shot in the face 25 years ago by a 13-year-old boy. It opened up an entire new world of forgiveness and compassion.

To me, he wasn’t an assailant, he was a child who really didn’t comprehend the magnitude of what he had done. Ironically, I was one of the very few people who believed that.

The judge handed down a sentence of life without parole. At 13 years old, Ian was going to spend the rest of his life behind bars. Everyone was happy. Ian got what he deserved.

“However, I was not happy. I believed they were throwing away a human being. I was not going to let Ian fade away. We all matter!”

What family he had were gone within a few years. I was the only person who cared. I encouraged him to write, so he wrote and wrote, and is still writing. He also earned his GED with very high scores because someone (me) was expecting that. I shared his story anywhere I could, and along the way, others jumped onboard to help him.

Recently, an amazing law firm took his case and got Ian’s sentence reduced. He now has a chance to live. I’m not sure if having compassion has made me a stronger woman, but it has made me a better parent, friend, sibling, and daughter.

Q: What does the first hour of your day look like?

My first hour looks pretty much like the rest of my day. My office is in my home, so I grab my coffee, let the dogs out, and sit down at my desk to begin my day. I feel blessed that I don’t have to do all the prep work (shower, make-up, clothes, and commute) to get to the office.

If you visit my office before noon, I am probably still in my jammies. I like to jump right in because I have so much to do every day.

Q: Tell us about your experience with being a vegetarian and competing in natural bodybuilding contests back in the early 90s.

When I began competing, I was a vegetarian, so I just followed diet plans geared toward that.

“I juiced a few times a day and knew that really helped build quality muscle. I ate plenty of egg whites and plant-based protein shakes. With that diet, I was able to stay close to contest-ready throughout my career and do very well on stage.”

Q: I feel it’s important for vegetarians (especially vegans) to stay open to the fact that not all people can safely eat a vegetarian diet due to their genetics, blood type, etc. What was the reason you decided to incorporate meat back into your diet?

I enjoyed my vegetarian diet but slowly integrated meat back into my diet because my body seemed to want it. I go back and forth depending on what my body craves.

Since I started visiting your website and publishing your great recipes and articles in “Natural Muscle,” I have enjoyed so many vegetarian meals that are easy to make!

Q: If you had to choose only three exercises, what would they be?

  • Lunge/squat superset
  • Push-ups
  • Planks

My three “favorites” are hyperextensions, lat pulldown, and leg press.

Q: If you had to choose only three supplements, what would they be?

  • Food-based multivitamin
  • EFAs
  • B-complex

Q: What are the biggest trends happening in bodybuilding right now?

The biggest trend is the expansion of the competitive arena for both men and woman. There are now many more options available. We can choose a stage where we belong. We don’t have to fit into the bodybuilder mould to compete in the fitness arena. That’s a great thing.

There are, however, three trends that baffle me:

  • The first is the growth hormone gut. I believe it is making a mockery of the sport.
  • The second one is the long and baggy board shorts worn in Men’s Physique contests. My word, it is not Men’s Upper Body contest, let’s see some lower body!
  • The third, and by far the most disturbing trend, is the “rear shot” in the Bikini contests. Who started that one, and why has it continued? It has no place on an athletic stage.

Q: Thoughts on CrossFit training?

I believe that whatever motivates people to get up and moving is a great training method. There are so many training modalities, and they are growing every day. If people are passionate about CrossFit, they are going to get results. The same goes for Zumba or Pure Bar. Just get up and move!

Q: How do you foster inner peace and balance?

I take my dogs for two long walks every day without a cell phone. It is peaceful and energizing at the same time.

“I have three dogs, and they truly ground me.”

I am a Reiki Practitioner, and although I have not practiced this healing modality on anyone in a while, I find it very useful to keep myself in balance.

Q: Three favorite books?

My favorite all-time favorite books are:

  • “The Four Agreements” by Miguel Ruiz
  • “Living, Loving, and Laughing” by Leo Buscaglia
  • “Knight in Shining Armour” by Jude Deveraux

Q: What are you currently working on?

We just completed the June 2015 issue (which you [Chris] are in again). We also recently started the BUFF Box, a box of several supplement samples shipped out monthly to subscribers. It is a great way for individuals to try different products.

There are so many on the market right now, choosing can become overwhelming.

We often leave trade shows with hundreds of different single serving products, which can be even more confusing. This plan allows the athlete to try out 4-5 different products for a week. Every box sold benefits fit2survive.org, a wonderful organization that supports and empowers individuals who have lost limbs.

Fit2survive.org helps these individuals reach their fitness and athletic goals by providing education, assistance, and equipment. I look forward to seeing how much we can raise on a monthly basis for this worthy cause.

A dream of mine down the road is to open a neighborhood high-end pet supply store that will carry only natural products. My business plan is done, and when the right time presents itself, it will be an exciting new adventure.

To get more ideas on how to eat and train as a vegetarian bodybuilder, watch this video – WHAT I ATE TODAY AS A VEGAN BODYBUILDER // SQUATS & AB WORKOUT

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – How to Eat and Train as a Vegetarian Bodybuilder?

How to Become a Vegetarian Bodybuilder?


If you’re wondering how to become a vegetarian bodybuilder (any form of a plant-based diet), you have come to the right place! Ready to live a healthier, thinner, more physically fit lifestyle? It’s time to go plant-based.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

If you’re wondering how to become a vegetarian bodybuilder (any form of a plant-based diet), you have come to the right place!

Ready to live a healthier, thinner, more physically fit lifestyle? It’s time to go plant-based.

Professional bodybuilders and athletes often enjoy improved physiques and athletic performance when they make the switch to plant-based diets. Beyond beating PRs and bulking up, there are many other reasons why people decide to make the switch to vegetarianism:

  • It’s good for health, energy and fitness levels
  • It’s good for the environment.
  • It reduces inhumane practices toward animals (i.e. industrialized meat production).

Interested in making the switch to vegetarianism? Read on to learn how to make the transition comfortably and ensure it lasts.

Addressing Concerns About Going Vegetarian

Cutting meat from your diet can be both mentally and physically challenging, even for bodybuilders and athletes. It’s natural to stress about how a plant-based diet will impact your performance. You’ll find yourself fretting about how to get enough protein to build lean muscle, and when a monster workout or competition date looms, you’ll wonder if plants alone can sustain your energy levels enough to succeed.

However, switching to a plant-based diet keeps you in good company within the athletic community. Health organizations around the world, including the American Dietetic Association and the Dietitians of Canada, endorse vegetarian diets for sports training in their Nutrition & Athletic Performance Position Statement.

Increasing, a number of vegetarian athletes, like Carl Lewis, Jane Welzel, and Brendan Brazier, continue to prove the merit of a vegetarian athlete diet.

Tips to Gradually Transition to a Vegetarian Diet

When you’re ready to try out a new lifestyle it’s natural to want to jump right in. However, that can be a mistake. According to the University of Rochester Medical Center, people who attempt to transform themselves into vegetarians overnight are less likely to stick with it for the long term. If you’ve been a meat-eater all your life, a gradual approach may be better.

To get started going vegetarian, try incorporating these eating habits into your weekly routine.

Educate yourself with vegetarian-friendly magazines, websites, and cookbooks.

Make easy modifications to your favorite recipes, replacing meat with beans and vegetables.

Hate veggies? Instead of eating salads, start with fresh green drinks that include stuff you should throw in a salad, especially dark green leafy veggies. This way, you slowly introduce these new foods into your system. Over time your palate/taste will change, and you will crave these kinds of foods.

Plant-based protein powders will easily bridge the gap in your protein needs.

Stir-fries and scrambles: You can make an endless combo of meals by mixing some veggies (broccoli, carrots, bell peppers, spinach, etc.), some protein (quinoa, tofu, tempeh, seitan, etc.), and some spices (turmeric, coconut oil, black pepper, sea salt, etc.), and cooking them up together.

Seek out vegetarian restaurants and try new vegetarian-based ethnic foods

Regularly search for new recipes to keep you excited about you diet

Eat healthy fats for calories. Plant foods you should be eating include avocados, nuts and seeds, and coconut oil.

Making the Transition to Vegetarian: A Timeline.

There’s no reason to rush the process of becoming vegetarian. By following this timeline, you’ll gradually (and painlessly) switch over to a vegetarian diet within a matter of months.

  • Weeks 1-2: Start with eliminating meat from only one meal per day for a couple weeks to build momentum.
  • Weeks 3-12: In addition to subtracting meat from one meal per day, eliminate all four-legged animals from your diet.
  • Weeks 13-24: Subtracting meat from two meals per day, eliminate all four-legged and two-legged animals from your diet.
  • Weeks 25-52: Subtract fish from your diet, which means you are now not eating any kind of meat at this point.
  • Week 52 and Beyond: If you feel that going vegan is right for you, then spend the next six to 12 months making the transition from vegetarian to vegan.

Vegetarian Diet Guidelines

Ready to start following a vegetarian diet? These meal plans and guidelines are designed to get you started, no matter what your health and fitness goals are.

Standard Baseline Diet

Put simply, a standard baseline diet is what your body is used to before you go vegetarian.

Therefore, it is the starting point from which comparisons can be made. Baseline diet studies are often evaluated in terms of meal frequency, caloric intake, water intake, and protein, carbohydrate, and fat intake.

Once you understand the effects of your current diet, you can determine what your baseline response is and gauge how dietary changes affect your fitness performance.

As an athlete, it’s important to consume more calories at breakfast than lunch, and more at lunch than dinner. This way, you’ll have the energy your need for your workouts and your metabolism will stay active.

It’s also important to spread protein intake throughout the day so your muscles can synthesize it. Recent research conducted by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and the Journal of the American Dietetic Association suggests limiting protein intake to 20 grams per sitting. (Bodybuilders will need significantly more).

Here’s what an average day our 135lb woman’s diet, with 90 grams of protein and 2,000 calories, should look like (a 225lb man trying to build muscle will almost need twice this):

  • Breakfast – 20g protein & 700 calories
  • Snack – 10g protein & 100 calories
  • Lunch – 20g protein & 500 calories
  • Snack – 10g protein & 200 calories
  • Dinner – 20g protein & 400 calories
  • Snack – 10g protein & 100 calories

“Light” Vegetarian Bodybuilding Meal Plan

If you’re looking to bulk up without gaining too much weight, this meal plan is a smart place to start.

(courtesy of top endurance athlete, Rich Roll)

  • Pre-Workout Morning Smoothie: Kale, Beet, Chia seeds, Hemp seeds, Maca, Orange, Flax Seeds, Vega Whole Food Optimizer
  • Post-Workout: Coconut water, and cold quinoa w/ coconut or almond milk, berries & Udo’s Oil & Hemp seeds
  • Lunch: Salad with mixed veggies & vinaigrette or brown rice, beans & greens, hemp seeds
  • Snacks: Vitamix with brown rice / pea / hemp protein, almond milk, cacao, almonds, walnuts.
  • Dinner: Lentils over brown rice w/ beet greens & avocado, arugula salad, sweet potatoes
  • Dessert: Coconut milk ice cream, Chia seed pudding (or homemade protein bar)
  • During workout: On bike – coconut water, vega sport, perpetum. On run – coconut water, Vega Sport, Heed.
  • If you want to add a little more “weight” to the meal plan, you can throw a black bean and quinoa veggie burger into the mix.

In Summary

Although most people will benefit from eliminating meat from their diets, athletes and fitness enthusiasts have the most to gain. Transitioning to a vegetarian diet is just as much of a mental mindset as a physical experiment.

Evaluate your current baseline diet and slowly make small changes every day. This is more than just a dietary change; it’s a strong, pure, and sustainable path to lifelong wellness.

As a vegan or vegetarian bodybuilder, it’s important to carefully plan your meals to ensure you reach your nutritional needs and avoid deficiencies which could hinder your strength training and athletic performance.

So long as you have a plan in place, your body will soon be enjoying the long-term benefits of adopting a healthier, more natural diet.

For more ideas on how to become a vegetarian bodybuilder, watch these 2 videos below –

Vegetarian Bodybuilding- Full Day of Eating – Pro Natural Bodybuilder Chris Elkins

HIGH PROTEIN VEGAN MEAL PREP | FULL DAY OF EATING

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice,providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – How to Become a Vegetarian Bodybuilder

Vegan Bodybuilding Diet – The Ultimate Vegan Diet Plan for Bodybuilding and Athletic Performance


Starting a vegan bodybuilding routine isn’t as tricky as you might expect. The good news is that the core bodybuilding diet guidelines are the same for vegan and omnivores alike. In fact, the only difference is that all of the protein sources in a vegan diet are non-meat, non-dairy, and are free from animal by-products. Listed in this article are ten tips for following a healthy, highly effective vegan bodybuilding diet.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

Vegan bodybuilding and plant-based fitness are becoming more popular every day.

Contrary to the outdated paradigm of traditional bodybuilding, going meat-free doesn’t mean you can’t build muscle or achieve your fitness goals. Instead, science is showing that eating a plant-based diet might be one of the best ways to reach them faster.

Although the mainstream fitness community seems to believe that bodybuilders must consume copious amounts of “superior” animal protein to bulk up, countless vegan bodybuilders have developed strong, sexy physiques while eating only plant-based foods.

If you’re a looking to build more lean muscle by way of a vegan bodybuilding diet, this article is the resource you need to get started.

Why Simply Cutting Out Meat Isn’t Enough

For the vegan novice, it’s easy to think that all it takes to gain the abs of your dreams is to cut out eggs and cheese in favor of cherished snack foods instead. However, this style of diet is more like to add on flab than fabulous muscle tone. To bulk up with veganism, you’ll need to follow a healthy, whole foods diet that gives your body exactly what it needs to thrive.

Crafting a vegan bodybuilding diet that works for you isn’t rocket science, but it does take some basic knowledge, motivation, and attention to detail. In this article, I will demystify the vegan bodybuilding meal plan and bikini competition diet and break it down into its most essential elements. Beyond the myths and the hype, here’s what bodybuilders should know about building muscle the vegan way.

Vegan Bodybuilding Diet – Guidelines for Vegan Bodybuilding Nutrition

Starting a vegan bodybuilding routine isn’t as tricky as you might expect. The good news is that the core bodybuilding diet guidelines are the same for vegan and omnivores alike. In fact, the only difference is that all of the protein sources in a vegan diet are non-meat, non-dairy, and are free from animal by-products.

Below are ten tips for following a healthy, highly effective vegan bodybuilding diet.

  1. Get Sufficient Calories

When using a vegan bodybuilding diet, getting enough calories is critical.

An average plant-based vegan diet has a much lower calorie content than a conventional diet, meaning vegans should closely monitor their levels. If you don’t consume enough calories, your body can shift into a catabolic state, meaning it devours itself for energy. The larger the calorie deficit, the more your body will fuel itself on existing muscle tissue instead. In other words, without consuming enough calories your hard-earned muscle mass will slowly waste away.

For peak form, bodybuilders should strive for 15 to 20 calories per pound of bodyweight, and then adjust that number based on noticeable gains or losses at the gym.

  • Keep Your Protein Levels High

Of the three macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates, and fats) the one that seems to matter most to bodybuilders is protein. This sometimes leads to stress for vegan athletes. Will your diet provide enough protein to keep you bulking up? The answer is yes, so long as you track your levels.

Any fitness dietary plan needs to contain a full menu of proteins from a variety of sources. For instance, experienced vegan bodybuilders can combine multiple protein powders derived from hemp, brown rice, and peas to form complete proteins.

There are plenty of ways to get the protein you need on a vegan diet. Dozens of delicious options for vegan protein sources abound, many of which are complete proteins. Examples include peanut butter sandwiches on Ezekiel bread, quinoa, hummus, and chia.

Tempeh is one of the most overlooked sources of vegan protein, but once you try it a few times, you may prefer it over tofu. Chickpeas and other legumes can provide a filling, low-fat source of protein and carbohydrates.

Need Meals on the Go? Turn Towards Vegan Protein Powders!

Let’s be real. Eating a vegan diet is not always convenient, especially when traveling or dining out. And even when you have the good fortune of finding a vegan meal, it’s usually not as high as necessary in vegetarian proteins.

Even so, there’s no real reason to stress about finding convenient protein. With the explosion of vegan protein powder options today, it’s easier than ever to have access to on-the-go protein!

Consuming two to three protein shakes a day will dramatically boost your protein intake, without excessive carbs. This is what helped me dial in my macros and turned my muscle building game around.

Best of all, protein powders are cost effective. Look for powders that are sourced with multiple proteins to better ensure the spectrum of amino acids needed for muscle growth.

  • Keep Omega 3 Levels High with Flax Seed Powder

Bodybuilders and athletes know that getting enough omega-3s is critical.

Consuming a lot of plants can get us close to the amount of omega-3s a vegan athlete needs, but supplementing for good measure is a good idea.

For this reason, ground flax is the perfect omega 3 source for your diet. It has a fantastic fiber profile and can be easier on the digestive system than flax seed oil. To experience the best results, you can take ground when you wake up, after training, and before bed.

  • Take Vegan BCAA

Vegan BCAA can help protect your muscles from the catabolic effects of a low-calorie diet and can help you gain mass. According to a 2010 study published in Med Science Sports Exercise, BCAA reduces muscle soreness after intense training.

What Is BCAA?

The branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are leucine, isoleucine, and valine. They are considered essential amino acids because human beings cannot survive unless these are present in a daily diet.

For the bodybuilding benefits, try taking five to 10 grams of BCAA with breakfast, five to 10 grams immediately before and after training and five to 10 grams before bed.

Food Sources of Vegan BCAA

Most amino acids come from meat protein sources, and generally speaking, getting enough aminos and protein is one of the more challenging aspects to bodybuilding as a vegetarian.

Here is a quick list of how to get BCAA from protein-rich vegan food sources:

  • Leucine: soybeans and lentils
  • Isoleucine: almonds, cashews, and chickpeas
  • Valine: peanuts, sesame seeds, and lentils

5. Stay Away from Spirulina for B12

One of the biggest misconceptions in vegan bodybuilding circles is that spirulina contains significant B12. While this is true in a way, it’s not useful to us.

(Spirulina is a biomass of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) that can be consumed by humans and animals. It is used as a dietary supplement for human consumption and also as a feed supplement in the aquacultureaquarium, and poultry industries)

It turns out that spirulina and tempeh contain mostly analogs of B12. Herbert [1988] reports that tests on tempeh, a fermented soy product, and spirulina revealed that they contained almost no true B12.

The problem here that this claim has been supported by lab tests for B12 based on the USP (U.S. Pharmacopeia) assay methods. Unfortunately, as explained in Herbert et al. [1984] and Herbert [1988], the USP assay method for B12 is unreliable.

The presence of analogs, rather than true B12, makes them unreliable sources for B12.

  • Consume Nuts for Fuel

It’s always a smart idea to add these power-packed snacks to your arsenal. Consuming nuts (and nut butter) provides a long-lasting form of energy. They’re also a much-needed source of healthy fat.

Because of how convenient they are to eat, nuts are also a great way to quickly boost your calorie intake. I carry a bag of lightly salted almonds in my backpack at all times.

  • Swap Rice for Quinoa

Rice is a staple of the vegan bodybuilding diet, so an effective method for boost your protein and nutritional intake is to simply swap rice for quinoa.

Quinoa has higher quality protein and is a complete source of protein, whereas brown rice is not. Quinoa is gluten-free and contains calcium, B-vitamins, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin E, and fiber.

Even better, quinoa tastes (and feels) similar to brown rice and should leave your taste buds just as satisfied.

  • Choose Healthy Drinks

There’s no reason to fill your body with unnecessary calories from sugary drinks. I keep things simple with coffee, tea, water, and protein shakes and drink roughly 2.0 to 2.5 liters of fluids each day. One way I gauge if I’m drinking enough fluid is that I make sure that my urine is pale yellow to clear.

If you are getting ready for a bodybuilding, bikini competition or photo shoot, your fluid needs should go up quite a bit and based on what your trainer suggests.

9.  Utilize Vegan Bodybuilding Supplements

No conversation about a bodybuilding diet would be complete without talking about supplements. Nutritional supplements have become practically a requirement for competitive bodybuilders these days, and the industry has shown few signs of trending away from them.

Rice protein and hemp protein are excellent sources of vegan protein that can easily replace whey and other animal-sourced products in shakes. But ultimately, the best vegan protein powder is made with multiple proteins to ensure the spectrum of amino acids needed to build muscle.

Garden of Life, Vega, and PlantFusion produce some excellent protein blends that skip the meat and go straight for the muscle.

10. Address Deficiencies Before They Become Damaging

When using a vegan bodybuilding diet, getting sufficient nutrients is critical.

It’s a good idea to vary the foods in your diet, as this will help prevent nutrient deficiencies.

This goes without saying for any bodybuilder. Also, keeping lots of variety in your diet makes eating more enjoyable.

Pay special attention to these common vegan deficiencies:

  • Protein
  • Calories
  • Iron
  • Iodine
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acids
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin D
  • Calcium
  • Zinc

If you’re feeling that your body is low on one or more of these nutrients, make sure to start taking a nutritional supplement that will get you back on track.

Vegan Bodybuilding Diet – Vegan Diet Plan Tips

Beyond the kinds of food you eat, the amount, timing, and way you eat it will make a difference in how fast you hit your bodybuilding goals. Below are some tips for getting the most out of your food so that you can put it to work for you.

  1. Eat Directly Before and After Workouts

Many vegan bodybuilders focus on main meals and don’t pay much attention to the snacks in between them. This is a mistake. Snacks are immediate sources of energy for your workouts and your recovery, and the snacks you choose at specific times make a huge difference in your performance and how you feel later on.

The best pre- and post-workout snacks are a healthy mix of protein and carbs. Light carbs like bananas, dates, and apples are great before your workout. When you’re done at the gym, enjoy a pick me up of carrots with hummus or protein shakes with vegan protein powder.

2. Monitor Your Body Weight and Body Fat

Since most vegans are concerned with lean muscle mass and not losing it, be sure take effective measurements.

This means you should be regularly measuring your body fat levels and comparing it to overall body weight in order to achieve a more accurate assessment of your progress in the gym than stepping on the scale alone.

  • Keep a Food Journal

The key to your success in adopting a vegan bodybuilding diet is not necessarily food intake – it’s about having an accurate awareness of what you eat. Human memory alone is not a reliable source for this kind of awareness. Instead, you need to take meticulous notes in a food journal.

To keep a proper food journal, you need to write down every sip of water and every crumb of food you consume throughout the day. Anything less is wasting your time. While it may seem like a pain at first, the process becomes effortless after a few days.

As a beginning vegan bodybuilder, you’re flying blind in a storm without this information. It’s simply too easy otherwise to have a misleading impression of what you’re actually eating and what’s actually working.

Sample Vegan Bodybuilding Meal Plan

Ideally, a vegan bodybuilding diet plan consists of 5-6 smaller meals. This gives your body a timely and consistent supply of nutrients for muscle repair and growth. It also keeps blood sugar levels more balanced.

Here are two days of sample meal plans to get you started for the week. Each one is packed with power and 100% vegan.

Meal Plan Day 1

  • Breakfast

Vegan protein shake, banana, 2 tablespoons of natural almond butter

  • Mid-morning

Bowl of lentil soup, cucumber salad with cherry tomatoes and avocado, 1 baked sweet potato

  • Lunch

Veggie burger, kale salad with handful of pumpkin seeds, apple

  • Post-Workout

Edamame & quinoa wrap with sweet ginger dressing, banana, vegan protein shake

  • Dinner

Veggie chili

  • Before bed

Vegan protein shake, 1 tablespoon of natural almond butter

Meal Plan Day 2

  • Breakfast

Bowl of steel-cut oatmeal, vegan protein shake

  • Mid-morning

Apple, handful of grapes, handful of strawberries, 1 cucumber

  • Lunch

Large salad with mixed greens

Mixed beans with artichokes and sprouts

Vegan protein shake

  • Post-Workout

Celery sticks with natural almond butter

  • Dinner

Veggie burrito with quinoa, beans, and avocado

Small side salad with mixed greens

  • Before bed

Vegan protein shake, mixed nuts

Tying It All Together

No matter which foods you settle on for your daily meals, it’s important to make sure that you’re getting plenty of variety to supply your body with a full array of muscle-building nutrients and protein sources.

With these meal plan recommendations and diet plan tips in mind, you should be more than equipped to start planning your healthy vegan meals. The overwhelming health and fitness benefits of a plant-based diet are undeniable, so now is the time to give vegan bodybuilding everything you’ve got!

For more ideas about vegan bodybuilding diet, watch this video – VEGAN MEAL PREP FOR MUSCLE | EASY HIGH PROTEIN MEALS

Author Bio:

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Vegan Bodybuilding Diet