Revealing Here the Simplest Cure for Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease


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The traditional medical system has been totally in the dark when it comes to the underlying causes of Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia.

And how can you cure something when you don’t even know how it happens?

But a new study from Amen Clinics, UC Irvine, Johns Hopkins University, and Thomas Jefferson University reveals not just the cause of Alzheimer’s but also the exact mechanism of how it happens.

Which leads to a simple, free way to cure it.

These researchers used brain imaging scans already obtained from previous research work at the Amen Clinics. Altogether, they had access to 35,442 brain scans taken from 17,721 adults between ages 18 and 94. Their average age was 40.8.

The scans of 128 of each participant’s brain areas were taken both while they were at rest and while they were engaged in a concentration task.

They were then categorized into underweight (BMI less than 18.5), normal weight (BMI between 18.6 and 24.9), overweight (BMI between 25 and 29.9), obese (BMI of 30 and up), and morbidly obese (BMI of 40 and up).

For all ages, brain function and blood flow declined progressively as BMI increased. This was true for almost all regions of the brain and both while the participants were at rest and concentrating.

This pattern was especially striking in the areas particularly involved in Alzheimer’s disease, namely the temporal and parietal lobes, the hippocampus, the posterior cingulate gyrus, and the precuneus.

For these areas, activity and blood flow started to decrease from normal weight, and then further to overweight, obese, and morbidly obese.

This is depressing when considering that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has calculated that 72 percent of American adults are overweight and 42 percent of them are obese. Sadly, 40 percent of young people aged 20 to 39 are obese, as are 44.8 percent of those between 40 and 59, and 42.8 percent of those above 60 years.

On the upside, a study like this shows in no uncertain terms that dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are lifestyle diseases that can be prevented using healthy dieting and exercise to lower body weight.

It’s also more proof that our dementia exercises that are focused on boosting your brain with oxygen are extremely effective in fighting off Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia. You can learn these simple brain booster exercises here…

Correlation between Strokes and Dementia

Dementia is a serious health condition in which the patient gradually loses his/her cognitive abilities. Studies done on this disease show there are numerous conditions that can cause Dementia. While, some of these conditions are treatable and can be avoided by making certain changes in lifestyle, there are others conditions about which not much can be done.

What is Dementia?

Dementia is a condition in which a person gradually loses his/her mental ability. The condition degenerates with time and as the condition worsens, patients experience a complete loss of their cognitive abilities.

What causes Dementia?

The condition is a result of gradual degeneration of brain cells in cerebral cortex, part of the human brain responsible for higher brain processes, such as thinking, reasoning, sensation, and memory. When the brain cells in cerebral cortex – the ‘grey matter’ of our brain – dies, patient loses their cognitive abilities. When this happens, patients face extreme difficulty in doing everyday tasks or reasoning through simple problems.

The biggest contributor to Dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the second major cause of this debilitating disease is vascular dementia. In vascular dementia, brain cells in cerebral cortex die gradually as a result of series of strokes, majority of which are minor in nature.

How stroke causes vascular dementia?

Cells in our body rely on life-nourishing oxygen for energy and growth and the oxygen is transported to different parts of the body by arteries. Stroke occurs when the brain does not receive the required amount of oxygen and blood. This happens when either the blood vessels that transfer the oxygen and other nutrients burst or are clogged.

When the brain cells are deprived of oxygen and blood for more than a few seconds, brain cells begin to die. The death of brain cells in cerebral cortex leads to the onslaught of vascular dementia.

Changes in lifestyle can reduce the risk of stroke

Vascular dementia is a very difficult condition to live with or see one’s loved ones dealing with. The patient loses their cognitive capabilities, causing great frustration and pain, as doing everyday tasks becomes progressively difficult.

Strokes can put you at a greater risk of developing dementia. With awareness and making changes in our lifestyle we can reduce the risk of developing stroke.

Eating a balanced diet and regular exercise helps in controlling the level of LDL, or bad cholesterol. This, in turn, reduces and controls the plaque buildup in the arterial walls, improving the blood flow in the body.

Click Here to Find The Simplest Cure for Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

Therapeutic Interventions can help Alzheimer’s Patients

Alzheimer’s is a fatal brain disorder, and as of now, there is no cure for this condition. The disease worsens with time and is recorded as the biggest contributor to dementia.

Different stages of Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease has three stages – mild, moderate, and severe. A person suffering from Alzheimer’s may show all or some of the symptoms mentioned below:

Mild

  • Frequently getting lost
  • Noticeably slow in completing everyday routine tasks
  • Frequently placing common things in odd places or losing them
  • Asking repetitive questions or making repetitive statements
  • Poor judgment
  • Problem in managing money
  • Noticeable personality or mood changes

Moderate

  • Problem in writing or reading
  • Speech problems
  • Decreased ability to connect with current reality
  • Decreased ability to understand date and time
  • Disturbance in sleep patterns
  • Difficulty performing simple activities such as dressing, grooming, and eating
  • Frequently unable to recognize familiar people or places

Severe

  • Inability to speak coherently and communicate with others
  • Loss of ability to recognize family members and friends
  • Sleeping for long hours at a stretch
  • Increased susceptibility to skin infections, respiratory problems, and other illnesses
  • Losing control over common bodily functions such as bladder, swallowing, or bowel control
  • Severe or complete failure of memory
  • Requiring constant care and monitoring

The symptoms mentioned above confirm what people whose loved ones have Alzheimer’s know all too well – that Alzheimer’s is very difficult to cope with, both for the patients and their families. Though Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease and one that has no cure yet, therapeutic interventions can help improve a patient’s quality of life.

What are Therapeutic Interventions?

 By definition, therapeutic interventions are non-invasive strategies used to treat the symptoms of a disease and to provide physical and mental relief to a patient.

Therapeutic interventions for Alzheimer’s try to connect an Alzheimer’s patient to his/her own life. Studies show that therapeutic interventions have a high success rate in decreasing an Alzheimer’s patient’s depression, anger, and anxiety.

Furthermore, as these activities require active participation of family members and friends, it also helps them to cope with the situation at hand.

Some of the important factors that go into therapeutic interventions are:

Routine – Creating a routine for Alzheimer’s patients is a must, as it lends consistency to each day and eases the confusion that is bound to occur with degenerating memory.

Structure – Structure is vital for Alzheimer’s patients as it defines each activity’s start and end time. Also, make sure that the place or room where each activity is conducted remains the same.

Planning – These include activities that are planned beforehand and cater to the patient.

Patient Involving – These include activities that engage Alzheimer’s patients and require their active involvement.

Customized activities – These include activities that are customized based on the previous experiences, history, interest, family, et al of an Alzheimer’s patient.

Uses of previous interests, hobbies, and skills – These activities are based on an Alzheimer’s patient’s previous interests, hobbies, and skills.

Examples of therapeutic interventions include: pet therapy, music, mediation, and exercise, to name a few.

Alzheimer’s disease is indeed difficult for both the patient and the family. However, therapeutic interventions can assist a great deal in improving the quality of the patient’s life.

Watch this video – What you can do to prevent Alzheimer’s | Lisa Genova

Click Here to Find The Simplest Cure for Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

This post is from the Brain Booster Exercise Program created for the purpose of helping to reverse Alzheimer’s, boost memory. It was made by Christian Goodman Blue Heron health news that has been recognized as one of the top-quality national health information websites.  This is an all-natural system that utilizes the power of exercises to slow down, prevent, or even reverse memory loss and boost your brain with energy and power. These exercises work to deliver as much nutrition and oxygen to your starving brain as possible and begin the restoring of the damaged brain cells.

To find out more about this program, click on Simplest Cure for Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

What is the Best Way to Reverse Alzheimer’s and Other Types of Dementia?


Click Here for Help with Alzheimer’s, Other Types of Dementia and General Memory Loss

Reverse Alzheimer’s and Other Types of Dementia – Moderate Amounts of This Drink Kills Your Brain

Everything is good in moderation, right?

Not so much, says a new study published in the journal BMJ.

In fact, drinking this common drink in “moderation” (often highly recommended by health experts) can drastically decrease your brain health and cognitive function over a few-year period.

Many studies show that moderate alcohol intake is beneficial for cardiovascular disease and a wide range of other health conditions.

But how about your brain?

Scientists took the data of 550 people collected by the Whitehall II cohort study.

At the beginning of the study, the subjects’ average age was 43 years.

They collected info on people’s alcohol intake and cognitive abilities periodically over 30 years.

They also took a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of their brains at the end of the study.

The researchers divided the participants into

– Light drinkers: 1–6 units of alcohol per week

– Moderate drinkers: 14–21 units of alcohol per week

– Heavy drinkers: more than 30 units of alcohol per week

The brain and cognitive functions of heavy drinkers were worse than the moderate drinkers who were, in turn, worse than the light drinkers.

In fact, there was no difference between the light drinkers and the complete abstainers on brain structure and cognitive abilities.

But the surprising finding is that moderate drinking is also bad for the brain.

One medium glass of wine (175 ml) contains two units of alcohol and so do 24 ounces of beer.

This means that one glass of wine or two beers a day will place you in the category of moderate drinkers, whose alcohol intake is too high for good brain health.

But there are ways to counteract this.

Reverse Alzheimer’s and Other Types of Dementia – If you’re interested in boosting your brain health (and reverse dementia and memory loss), learn how to load your brain with the one ingredient it needs here …

Reverse Alzheimer’s and Other Types of Dementia – Sleeplessness may cause Alzheimer’s

A critical predictor of future trouble with Alzheimer’s disease has been recently linked with the effects of chronic sleep debt and insomnia, as a study supported by the National Institute of Health revealed.

A product the body produces that has been very closely linked with people who develop Alzheimer’s disease has been blamed on lack of sleep recently.

Amyloid plaque is the culprit, and chronic sleep debt and insomnia is the cause, reports a study recently supported by NIH and the Ellison Foundation.

More research is ongoing to find the specific relationship between the buildup of this plaque and its association with insomnia. Yet one more reason to work at getting a full night’s sleep consistently.

The best way to conquer insomnia without harmful drugs

Reverse Alzheimer’s and Other Types of Dementia – Alzheimer’s Causes and Prevention

Alzheimer’s disease is a condition of pre-senile dementia. Though, millions of people today have Alzheimer’s disease, its cure is yet to be discovered. The road to freedom from Alzheimer’s, as of now appears a long one, as scientists and doctors are yet to unearth the causes of this disease.

Though, Alzheimer’s was first described in 1906, many misconceptions are still attached to this disease. Even today, most people incorrectly perceive Alzheimer’s as a disease in which elderly people lose all control over their mental faculties and memory. A lot of blame for this misconception goes to media, which has repeatedly portrayed Alzheimer’s as this.

Generally, the first signs of Alzheimer’s appear when a person is in forties or fifties.

Earliest symptoms include loss of short-term memory; the individual fails to recall recent events, such as whether he/she took the morning’s medicines.

Memory impairment is then followed by noticeable deterioration in the thought and speech process, such as being unable to do simple calculations, or inability to find words to describe simple items.

Alzheimer’s is a degenerative condition; as the disease progresses, the patients may become totally incapable of caring for themselves.

In recent times, researchers have made noticeable progress in understanding some of the important attributes of this disease, such as presence of high amount of tangles and plaques in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients.

Tangles and plaques are protein that accumulates in a human’s brain over time. While, tangles build up in inside the nerve cells, plaques accumulate in the gaps between nerve cells in the brain. While, in most people this build up happens naturally with aging, studies show the amount of plaque and tangles in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients is substantially more than found in normal people.

While the progress is heartening, certain roadblocks still need to be crossed. For instance, researches are yet to fully understand this build up or all the factors that facilitate it.

However, scientists have found certain factors that contribute to the increased build-up of tangles and plaques. These factors are:

  • Family history
  • Age
  • Lifestyle

While, not much can be done about age or parentage, we do have control over our lifestyle. Studies indicate a balanced diet and regular physical activity can reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.

Studies also show head injuries can lead to Alzheimer’s disease. Keeping our head protected by wearing helmet while driving a two-wheeler, or using a seat-belt while driving a car is in our control. So, take proper precautions to keep your head protected from injuries.

A healthy brain also reduces your chances of developing Alzheimer’s in future. Keep your brain active by doing activities that require you to focus and brainstorm. Daily devote some minutes to mentally stimulating activities, such as solving puzzles.

Further, studies show a direct correlation between a healthy heart and an active, healthy and vibrant brain.

For more ideas to reverse Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia, watch these 2 videos –

What you can do to prevent Alzheimer’s | Lisa Genova

Dr. Dale Bredesen on Preventing and Reversing Alzheimer’s Disease

This post is from the Brain Booster Exercise Program created for the purpose of helping to reverse Alzheimer’s, boost memory. It was made by Christian Goodman Blue Heron health news that has been recognized as one of the top-quality national health information websites.  This is an all-natural system that utilizes the power of exercises to slow down, prevent, or even reverse memory loss and boost your brain with energy and power. These exercises work to deliver as much nutrition and oxygen to your starving brain as possible and begin the restoring of the damaged brain cells.

To find out more about this program, click on Reverse Alzheimer’s and Other Types of Dementia

What is the Best Way to Prevent and Even Lower Alzheimer’s Risk?


Click Here for Help with Alzheimer’s, Other Types of Dementia and General Memory Loss

Prevent and Even Lower Alzheimer’s Risk – This Gut Issue Increases Alzheimer’s Risk by 600 %

Gut health is usually not on the long list of risk factors when it comes to dementia.

But according to a new study from University of California at San Francisco and Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan, it should be.

One specific gut health issue (you may not even know you have) can increase your risk of Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia up to 600%.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comes in several forms, of which the two most common types are Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In this study, the researchers found a relationship between both of these forms and dementia.

The researchers collected the records of 1,742 IBD patients from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database and found 17,420 controls that matched them on sex, income, access to healthcare, and conditions that normally co-occur with dementia.

The subjects in both the study and control groups were 45 years and older and were all followed for about 16 years.

While 5.5 percent of IBD patients developed dementia in this period, only 1.4 percent of those in the control group did so.

After ensuring that other dementia risk factors (like cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking) did not influence their results, the researchers concluded that those with IBD were approximately 2.54 times more likely to develop dementia and more than 6 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than people without IBD were.

Further, those with IBD developed dementia around 7 years earlier than those without IBD did, at ages 76.24 and 83.45 years, respectively.

The dementia risk increased even further for those who had IBD the longest, compared with those for whom it was a new diagnosis.

While there is still much disagreement and uncertainty about the precise mechanism that connects IBD to dementia, it is understood that conditions that involve the perforation of the walls of the gastrointestinal tract cause gut bacteria-derived neurotoxic metabolites to travel to the central nervous system and into the brain.

Prevent and Even Lower Alzheimer’s Risk – There is however another factor that is even more dangerous when it comes to dementia. It’s all about lacking ONE free ingredient explained here…

Problems in the gut have been linked to almost all modern diseases, and there is one factor that is most important when it comes to gut health—as we’ll explain here…

Prevent and Even Lower Alzheimer’s Risk – How Cardiovascular Health Effects Your Brain

If you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or even type 2 diabetes, you’ve probably been warned that these conditions could cause serious health issues, such as stroke or heart attack down the road.

But what you may not be aware of is that these conditions are affecting your body’s functions already. And it’s affecting the one organ that we all want to have in good shape.

According to a new research study, a link between heart health and cognitive strength has been found in individuals from as young as 35 years old.

The study shows that as the risk associated with heart disease rises, individuals experience a decline in cognitive function.

According to the lead author of the study and a fellow within the Groningen University Medical Center in the Netherlands, Hanneke Joosten, many people assume that they will struggle with the consequences of poor health habits such as smoking and bad diet only years down the line, but this isn’t the case.

Unhealthy habits affect you much sooner than you think. Joosten states that people understand that their habits might affect their heart health, but they fail to take their brain into account.

In his own words, “What’s bad for the heart is also bad for the brain.”

In order to conduct this research, 3778 people were studied between the ages of 35 to 82. The entire group was provided with cognitive function tests, ranging from their ability to reason and plan, as well as how comfortable they were in switching tasks.

Another test was used to determine their memory functioning.

The Framingham Risk Score was then used to determine each individual’s cardiovascular-related risk over the period of the next 10 years.

Those who were found to be more at risk for heart disease were also found to perform 50% worse on the cognitive tests.

Some of the biggest contributors to the decline in cognitive health were diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking and bad cholesterol.

Smokers with a 15-a-day habit had, on average, a 2.4 points drop in their cognitive scores, while those with a habit exceeding 16 a day dropped by 3.43.

The memory tests showed precisely the same results.

The study was published in “Stroke,” the journal of the American Heart Association.

Completely eliminate type 2 diabetes, and reverse some of the effects of type 1 diabetes – all in 3 simple steps…

Get your cholesterol under control in 30 days or less following this step-by-step plan…

High Blood Pressure? Discover how 3 easy exercises drop your blood pressure below 120/80 as soon as today…

Prevent and Even Lower Alzheimer’s Risk – High Cholesterol Levels Promote Alzheimer’s

Another urgent reason to get cholesterol under control has been gaining attention in Alzheimer’s circles lately as scientists are finally discovering what the connection is.

Scientists and researchers have long suspected that people with high cholesterol levels are at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, but the connection as to why has eluded them until recently.

Cholesterol is critical in the body for being able to absorb and make use of critical fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E and K.

However, bad cholesterol levels that are too high cause a cascade of problems all over the body as well, even in the brain.

Scientists found that one of the toxic proteins involved in clumps that damage nerve cells in the brain that cause Alzheimer’s symptoms actually bind to cholesterol, which carries it to the brain.

While there are more pieces to the mystery behind triggers and a cure, researchers were very encouraged by finding this critical relationship.

For more idea to prevent and even lower Alzheimer’s risk, watch these 2 videos –

What you can do to prevent Alzheimer’s | Lisa Genova

Can healthy lifestyles help lower the risk of dementia?

Get control of your high cholesterol here, naturally…

Learn easy exercises that get blood pressure under control…

This post is from the Brain Booster Exercise Program created for the purpose of helping to reverse Alzheimer’s, boost memory. It was made by Christian Goodman Blue Heron health news that has been recognized as one of the top-quality national health information websites.  This is an all-natural system that utilizes the power of exercises to slow down, prevent, or even reverse memory loss and boost your brain with energy and power. These exercises work to deliver as much nutrition and oxygen to your starving brain as possible and begin the restoring of the damaged brain cells.

To find out more about this program, click on Prevent and Even Lower Alzheimer’s Risk